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2015

 

2015 Journals

January 2015 February 2015 March 2015 April 2015 May 2015 June 2015 July 2015 August 2015 September 2015 October 2015 November 2015

 January 2015VOL 55 NO 1
Portea petropolitana var. extensa. Photo: Dave Anderson
Portea

2BROMELIAD SHOW & SALE
Saturday 21st and Sunday 22nd February
Mt Eden War Memorial Hall
489 Dominion Road, Balmoral, Auckland
9.00am – 3.00pm both days

2015 Bromeliad

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – January 2015 issue

CONTENTS
President's Page – Graeme Barclay 4
Bromeliad Society November meeting news – Dave Anderson 5
'Special Species Spotlight' – Graeme Barclay 8
2014 monthly trophy and competition winners 10
2015 'Fiesta' Show competition classes and rules 11
Learning about the genera: Peter Waters on Portea 13
A little history on the BSI logo – Barbara Black 15

Group News 17
An oasis near Kerikeri – Erin Titmus 18

do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 17 for details of group meeting

times and venues.

JANUARY
27th Society monthly meeting at

Billbergia.

Peter Waters will talk about the 'Fiesta'
Show competition rules and Nancy

display from a judge's perspective.

FEBRUARY

1st South Auckland Group meeting
15th Eastern Bay of Plenty Group
meeting

21st / 22nd 'Fiesta'

and Plant Sale at Mt Eden War Memorial

24th Society monthly meeting at

Zealand Neoregelia hybrids. There will
be a review of plants from the 'Fiesta'
Show and we will also be discussing the
New Zealand Neoregelia hybrids.

FRONT COVER: Up close and colourful with Portea petropolitana var. extensa.

This month we are featuring Portea in our 'Learning about the genera' series and you

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Happy New Year everyone!

I hope you've had a great
festive season and your broms are
now enjoying the sunshine and warm
weather. 2014 was a warmer than
usual year overall with a mild winter,
it certainly looks like 2015 could be
no different the way its started – no
complaints from me! I've regularly
had around 40 degree temperatures
in my greenhouse over the last few
weeks, meaning one has to be 'onthe-ball' with watering and ventilation

– especially with small and tender
seedlings.
Congratulations to Peter Coyle for

taking out all three trophies in our
monthly meeting competition. Peter
won the trophies for 'Most Points
Overall', 'Plant of the Month' and
also the newly designated Bea
Hanson Plate trophy for 'Most Points
in Monthly Choice Section'. This
trophy was previously awarded to the
member with 'Most points overall
who had not won a trophy before', but

this was becoming harder to award

each year. Hence, the committee

decided to from now on award it for
'Monthly Choice' to encourage more
members to participate in this section.

Congratulations also to David Cowie

who won the Bea Hanson Memorial
Trophy for 'Outstanding Service to
the Society'. David is a long standing
committee member who spent a lot

of his own time creating the 'Cool

Broms' DVD copies after conference.
He also organises and tirelessly mans
our EFTPOS and till at the Society

sales and looks after our audio visual
necessities at meetings. Thanks again
David for all that you do.

In this Journal you will find the
Schedule of Classes and Rules for

entering plants in our 2015 'Fiesta'

Competitive Show. The 'Fiesta' is

on February 21st and 22nd. It's not
too late to prepare and enter plants in
any of the almost thirty classes. I was
recently asked by someone living out
of Auckland if they were allowed to
enter a plant in the show. The answer

is, absolutely... as long as you are a
current member of the BSNZ, have
grown the plant for 6 months or more

prior to the show and can submit it
for entry on Friday 20th between 1pm
and 5pm. The 'Fiesta' show is for all
members of the BSNZ to participate
in and enjoy. If you haven't entered

a plant before, I would certainly

encourage you to have a go.

Also, any current BSNZ member

is able to sell plants at the 'Fiesta'.

If you would like a table, you can
contact myself on Ph: 09-817-4153

or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We
will also have a list circulating at the
January 27th meeting for sellers and
helpers on the day to register their
names. Given there was no public

'Spring Sale' in 2014, please note
that space for sellers may be limited,

so having more than one table per

seller may not be possible, depending
of course on the final numbers.

See you at the 'Fiesta'!

Cheers, Graeme Barclay

Bromeliad Society
November Meeting News – Dave Anderson

Graeme welcomed the sixty
or so members who attended
the last meeting of 2014. The
'Fiesta' with the Society's annual show
is only 12 weeks away so please start
getting your plants ready. If you are
going to attend the next Australasian
Conference held during April 2015
in Parramatta, near Sydney, and have
not booked, please do so as soon as
possible. Finally a special thank you to
those members who have contributed
articles/photos for our Journals this
year. Do keep your cameras and
notebooks handy over the summer
season.

The trophy and annual competition
winners were then presented with their
prizes.

'Show and Tell' followed and first up

and wanting a name was a Billbergia
with the leaves a pastel red all over. It
was thought to be one of Don Beadle's
hybrids but unfortunately no one could
name it. Next for display was the
perfumed species Neoregelia odorata

with the flowers fully open. Following

this was a clump of the species
Quesnelia 'Tim Plowman' growing
in a pot with the owner wanting to
know why the plants had remained
so small being only some 20cm high.
It was thought that the plants needed
some fertiliser either by foliar feeding
and/or replacement of the potting
mix. Wanting a name was the species

Tillandsia macropetala that had
previously had the name Tillandsia
grandis (small form). A large bigeneric

bred by the late Gerry Stansfield with

one parent thought to be Aechmea was
also wanting a name but it could not

be identified further. In full flower was

the species Aechmea guarapariensis
with its white petals. There was some
debate about the name of this plant
that has had other names in NZ.

The annual auction of rare and special

plants followed with Peter Coyle

our auctioneer once again doing
outstanding work to obtain some lively
bidding and prices.

John Muddiman and Diane Timmins
won the special raffle prizes.

The door prizes went to Diane

Timmins, Graeme Barclay and

Andrew Maloy.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First was Peter

Coyle with Guzmania 'Denise' (albomarginated) and second equal were

Graeme Barclay with Vriesea elata
and Bev Ching with xNeophytum
'Ralph Davis'. Also in the competition

were Aechmea 'Alvarez'; Canistrum
triangulare; Nidularium rutilans;
xNeomea 'Strawberry'; Vriesea
'Highway Beauty' and 'Sarah May'.

Cont'd P6

Cont'd from P5 – Bromeliad Society Meeting News

Open Foliage:

with Billbergia 'Pink Fountain' that
also won plant of the month. Bev

xNeophytum

Nidularium innocentii; Guzmania
'Decora' hybrid; Neoregelia 'Yang'
and Vriesea
'Snowman'.

Tillandsia:

Tillandsia macdougallii a clump of

also second with Tillandsia straminea.
In the competition were Tillandsia
brachycaulos, carlsoniae, ehlersiana
albertiana seideliana, streptophylla,
paleacea ssp. apurimacensis and
ventanaensis.

Neoregelia:

with Neoregelia 'Fairy Tale'and second
Neoregelia

'Blushing Zebra'. In the competition

were Neoregelia dayvidiana
lilliputiana princeps

Green Beauty' and 'Lorena'.

Christmas Decoration: First was
Lynette Nash with a very attractive

Graham also with an attractive
arrangement. All of the arrangements
in this year's competition were of a
very high standard.

The Plant of the month went to Peter
Billbergia 'Pink Fountain'.

enjoyable evening.

NEXT MEETING: Tuesday 27th

2015 Bromeliad
Saturday 21st and
Sunday 22nd February

Phone 09-817 4153.

Photos from November monthly meeting...

BY DAVE ANDERSON

– (Judy

Guzmania
Tillandsia macdougalii
Neoregelia

By Graeme Barclay
This time of year, the neoregelias are shining, this month we look at a sumptuous
variegated cultivar with a different look about it.

Neoregelia 'Goldilocks'

Neoregelia 'Goldilocks' is
actually a variegated form of protect seedlings of other plants and
Neoregelia small shrubs to establish around them.
cruenta.
lives in pure sand in
coastal beach and
dune areas around

it is considered
by botanists to
be a 'pioneer
plant'. When these
bromeliad clumps

leaves decompose
and help fertilise and

form and the sand becomes colonised

to these initial Neoregelia cruenta
clumps. Another widely known
bromeliad that lives in the same area
and performs this same pioneering

Aechmea nudicaulis var.
aequalis. Neoregelia cruenta is also a

depending on the environment they
grow in. It is therefore very suited to
full sun and high wind conditions and
is extremely tough and hardy.

The actual origin of the variegated
form of Neoregelia cruenta.

originally found by collectors in Brazil
from its coastal natural habitat. Like

often sold by nurseries as Neoregelia
cruenta variegata
made their way to Australia and more

was named and registered by Margaret
Butcher of Adelaide as Neoregelia

There is also possibly a white or cream
centrally variegated form of Neoregelia
cruenta

entry of Neoregelia 'Goldilocks'.

whether in fact this plant is actually

is actually another different variegated
form yet to be widely distributed and

registered as a cultivar. There are three
other variegated registered clones of
Neoregelia cruenta in circulation –
two of which will also soon become
available in New Zealand – more
on these later in another article!

genetics in Neoregelia 'Goldilocks'
makes cultivation in New Zealand
easy. A light shade to full sun position
in a healthy potting mix is best to
ensure it attains a well proportioned

as shown in the photos here. As with
some forms of Neoregelia cruenta
this particular variegate has the ability
to grow to a massive size. When well

I have seen it with leaves unbelievably
around 1.5 metres long each. Like

with environment and feeding is
the key to attaining a nicely formed
plant that is not too 'strapped out'.

well known variegated Neoregelia
johannis clone – Neoregelia

– Neoregelia 'Goldilocks' is a

all vegetative pups growing true to the

is a great attribute for a variegated

it is sure to offer lots of enjoyment to
collectors and make a great focal point
in our Kiwi gardens for many years to
come.

2014 Trophy Winners

Judged over eleven monthly meetings of the Bromeliad Society.
BEA HAnSOn TROPHy

Most points in Monthly Choice competitions

Peter Coyle

CEnTEnnIAL TROPHy – Most points overall for the year
Peter Coyle

GREEnOuGH TROPHy – Plant of the month competitions
Peter Coyle

BEA HAnSOn MEMORIAL TROPHy

Awarded to a member who has given outstanding service to the Society
and who typifies the founding spirit and commitment of Bea Hanson.
(Judged by our President and Patron)

David Cowie

2014 Monthly Competition Winners

Judged over eleven monthly meetings of the Bromeliad Society.
FLOWERInG
1st Peter Coyle 52 Points

2nd David Goss 34
3rd Judy Graham 18

FOLIAGE
1st Peter Coyle 65 Points

2nd David Goss 34
3rd Judy Graham
John Muddiman 14

TILLAnDSIA

1st Lynette Nash 59 Points

2nd David Anderson 37
3rd Lester Ching 35

nEOREGELIA

1st Peter Coyle 61 Points
2nd David Goss 24
3rd Graeme Barclay 21
MOnTHLy CHOICE
1st Peter Coyle 52 Points
2nd David Goss 34
3rd Lynette Nash 13

BEST PLAnT OF THE MOnTH

(Over the 11 months)

1st Peter Coyle 5½ wins

MOST POInTS OvERALL
1st Peter Coyle 239 Points

2nd David Goss 127
3rd Lynette Nash 69

BRoMELIAD SoCIETY oF N.Z.
(INC) CoMPETITIVE SHoW 2015

CoNDUCTED AS PART oF oUR ANNUAL
2015 Bromeliad

SCHEDULE oF CLASSES

Class

1. Aechmea
3. Billbergia
4. Cryptanthus or Orthophytum
5. Guzmania
6. Bromeliad species (any genus)
7. Neoregelia
8. Neoregelia Midi size
9. Nidularioids
10. Tillandsia Small Blooming
11. Tillandsia Small Foliage
14. Tillandsia Large Blooming
15. Tillandsia Large Foliage
16. Vriesea Blooming
17. Vriesea Foliage
CoNDITIoNS oF ENTRY

18. Bigeneric or other genus not
listed above
19. Miniature bromeliad
20. Variegated bromeliad
21. Pitcairnioideae
23. Dish or tray garden or
novelty planting
24. Bromeliad arrangement
25. Artistic or floral arrangement
26. Decorative container
27. Hanging container
28. New Zealand hybrid
29. Original Bromeliad Art Work
30. Educational display
1. Exhibitors must be financial 4.
members of the Bromeliad
Society of N.Z.

2. A maximum of two plants may be
entered in each class.
3. Plants must have been grown by
exhibitor for at least six months
prior to show.
Plants must be clean and healthy,

free from scale and insects and
drained of water. Pots must be
clean and potting mix free of
weeds and other plant material.
Each plant should be correctly

labelled with name, or if
unnamed, with parents, and with

Cont'd P12 11

Cont'd from P11 – Schedule of Classes

no abbreviations. (ie. Neoregelia

hybrid is unacceptable). This rule

and 28. Labelling not necessary in

5. Plants may be potted only in

black plastic pots or unadorned
bonsai pots. They may also be
mounted on any suitable material.

or milk may be used to enhance

the appearance of the plant.

7. A pot may contain single or
multiple plants provided they are
attached to a single rootstock.

to 21 and 28.

8. Neoregelia Midi size is for plants
less than 200mm high and 250mm
wide.

Wittrockia and Edmundoa.

attached to mounts and must look

established. They may be single or

within the stated measurements.
Fiji Trophy awarded for Best
Tillandsia.

11. Tillandsia sizes are: Small (up

(8in plus)). These measurements

12. Miniature bromeliad may be
single or have multiple heads

no plant more than 12.5cm (5in)

Tillandsias are not permitted in
this class.

13. Variegated bromeliad is a

longitudinal stripes on leaves.

and Deuterocohnia.

15. Olive Allan Trophy for Best of

and 28 only.

uses bromeliads only and can
incorporate only natural materials.
Plastic pots are not allowed.
Ern Bailey Trophy for Best
Arrangement awarded to winner
of this class.

arrangement may use other

types of plant but must include a

material.

where emphasis is placed on

harmony or contrast between

one plant but of one type only.

or other original work of art
executed by the exhibitor.

of bromeliads and/or other visual
aids designed to educate on any
phase of bromeliad horticulture.

21. Entries may not be removed from
show until after 3pm. on Sunday
22nd February.
22. Unless mentioned above other
rules as BSI standard show. Final

Stewards.

23. Entries will be accepted between
1pm and 5pm only on Friday 20th
February.

Learning about the genera : Portea
– Peter Waters
T Portea described was
Portea kermesina
however as the plant that later became
Portea petropolitana was found in
1840 and went through a succession
Aechmea noettigii.
Porteas were named after Dr Marius
Porte of Paris who introduced Portea
kermesina into cultivation in 1855.

There are presently nine Portea
species and the genus is endemic to

sun on rocks or on the seashore. They

and stiff leaves. They are reasonably
easy to cultivate in New Zealand but
are somewhat prone to frost damage.
They possess outstandingly showy

primary bracts of pink or red at the

of pink and blue prevail.

Porteas are closely related to

Brazil where they mainly grow in full
Portea kermesina.

(refer Journal cover for
Portea petropolitana var. extensa.

Cont'd P14 13

Cont'd from P13 – Learning about the genera: Portea

Portea alatisepala.

locally.

means they are joined together and not
separate as in Aechmea, Billbergia and
Quesnelia.

The most common species is Portea
petropolitana which is a rather
large Aechmea type plant with a

persists for three or four years and thus
can be useful as a dried arrangement.

with prominent black spines.

Portea kermesina is a medium sized
plant with a colourful show when

for many years. While it is relatively
easy to grow it seems to have become

of the earlier imports to New Zealand.

Portea nana is a newer species that is

and blue.

Portea fosteriana and Portea
alatisepala are both very attractive
species and may possibly be found

A little history on the BSI logo...

– Barbara Black. (Reprinted and adapted from the June, 2014 issue of the
East London Bromeliad Society – newsletter, S.A.)
Ihave been trawling through some

line. I found it interesting to read
how the BSI logo came about. In the

'Our bromeliad insignia was designed
by our president (Mulford B. Foster).

parts of bromeliads. The outside circle
with jagged edge represents the spiny
margins found on the leaves of most of
the genera of the two subfamilies called
Pitcairnioideae and Bromelioideae,
such as the genera Billbergia,
Ananas, Dyckia, Puya, etc. The plain
inner circle represents the smooth-
edged leaves found in the sub-family
Tillandsioideae such as the genera
Vriesea, Tillandsia, Guzmania. Two
heavily inked spots on either side of

the words 'organized 1950' represent
the microscopic peltate scales formed
on the leaves of all bromeliads. In the
center the epiphytic Vriesea growing
on a tree limb represents one of the

formation throughout the two largest
genera of the family, Vriesea and
Tillandsia.'

Editor's note: Readers will note that

modernised somewhat from the

message.

oFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters

Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451
David Cowie 09-630 8220
Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Sandy Stonham 09-627 9658
Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIoN

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,

Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.

BRoMELIAD JoURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please

contact any member of the editorial committee

or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first

Tuesday of publication month

Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00

Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

'Buy & Swap'

Listings in 'Buy & Swap' are FREE for

members of the Society (max. 30 words).

For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366

or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Group News

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
We had a glorious summer's day for our
Christmas meeting on 7th December.
Our thanks go to Margaret and Robert

Flanagan who kindly hosted our
meeting in their stunning garden.

A new feature at our Christmas

meeting this year was a parade of hats
that raised a smile. Winners received
a wonderful bottle of sparkling grape
juice. The judges deliberated for some
time and eventually decided that there
would be three winners. First prize

went to Norma Cook for her LCD

illuminated effort. Second place went
to Lyn Wardlaw whose handmade hat
featured some really beautiful felting.
Third place was modelled elegantly by

John Muddiman. This hat also featured

LED lighting.

Our good friend Wilma Fitzgibbons
brought along a lot of tillandsias for

sale on behalf of Cushla Chudleigh.

The few that weren't sold will remain
at the Flanagans and are still available
for sale.

We all enjoyed a lavish buffet which

included quail eggs, Mrs Flanagan's

homemade lemonade and a salmon

quiche that was to die for. The bangers

were fabulous and nobody went
home hungry. Many thanks to all our
members who brought along so many
treats.

Our Bumper Christmas raffles were
won by Judy Graham, Nilda Fisk,

Ian McPherson, Becky Cavit, Helen

Sammons and Kay McMahon.

Next Meeting: There will be no

meeting in January. Our first meeting
of 2015 will be 1.30pm on Sunday,

1st February at the home of Ann and

Graham Thomson at 263 Ponsford
Road, Te Toro. A reminder and

instructions of how to get there will be
emailed to members towards the end

of January.

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad
and Orchid Group

– Alison Iremonger
The final get together for 2014 was

an enjoyable lunch at the Whitehouse

Café. Sue Laurent welcomed those
present. Ross Fergusson will be our

new 'Leader' at the start of 2015. Sue
has decided to stand down and have a
break after leading the group since it
began many years ago. Our thanks go
out to Sue for the wonderful job she

has done. Ross gave an outline of a

programme for the coming year and
was open to any suggestions from the
members. A belated birthday wish was

given to Bubbles Rivett. Secret Santa

presents were given out. A selection
of tillandsias were for sale. Members
then sat and chatted for the rest of the
afternoon.

Next Meeting: Sunday 15th February.
Visitors are always welcome to our

meetings. Contacts: Maureen Moffatt
07-322 2276, Ross Fergusson 07-312
5487, Sue Laurent 07-307 1323.

A subtropical oasis near Kerikeri

– Article and photos by Erin Titmus
To drive through grassy paddocks
near Kerikeri to the garden of Pru
and Leo Helleur is to arrive at a
subtropical oasis. The stands of mature
palms carpeted with under planting
of broms and succulents immediately
give a sense of anticipation that there
is so much more to see.

Pru and Leo began creating their

gardens fifteen years ago from bare

paddock and using the very large rocks
that were on site. They had brought
with them a truck full of plants from
their previous garden in Karaka. Pru

says she had no plan and to 'Just get a

spade out and start!' She has changed
the edges many times but has stopped
now to allow space to negotiate the

flowing winding green paths that lead

the visitor to new vistas around each
bend.

Pru has no favourites among her broms,

but Leo does like the vrieseas most. And
big vrieseas and alacantareas feature
strongly to give height in the under
planting. Pru keeps these well groomed
so that she does not provide welcome
homes for wetas. The foreground of

Obituary: John Frew
– Jacqui O'Connell
Members of the Far North Bromeliad Group were all saddened by the
recent passing of John Frew. John and his late wife, Colleen, were founding
members of our group and also founding members of the Northland
Bromeliad Group.
John was a great character with many varied interests. He was an avid
collector of both bromeliads and orchids with a wealth of knowledge to
impart to anyone who approached him with a problem or enquiry regarding
identification or cultivation. He always had a twinkle in his eye and a
cheeky remark. He also had a great interest in the history of his township of
Kawakawa and was a keen supporter of the vintage steam train which runs
up the main street.
John combined these interests with his love of photography and computing
and would always be at the ready with his camera at our group meetings
and garden visits. I am sure most of our members have copies of John's
DVDs with wonderful memories of lovely plants and happy occasions.
We will miss John and his generous encouragement to each of us and his
support of the group.

colourful neoregelias and aechmeas
includes many treasures that came

from Len Trotman, classic beauties
such as Neoregelia. 'Apricot Beauty,'
Neoregelia 'Empress,' Neoregelia.
'113' x carolinae and some beautiful

neoregelia hybrids from Jack Hobbs.

The north beds of the garden feature

tall aloes and other succulents, again

planted among large rocks. These
work in harmony with the more lush

beds as those also have flowing seas of

echeverias and graptopetalums used

as fill among the lower bromeliads.

Sometimes they provide colour
contrast: E. elegans with dark red
neoregelia and other times they

complement, such as pale green E.
agavoides' red tips working with
similar red neos. To establish these
mass plantings Pru spaces out the pups

and covers them with fine chicken

wire to give them a chance to establish
without interference from birds
pecking in the open soil area.

Alongside the development of the

ornamental garden, Leo and Pru have

worked to provide for the kitchen. Pru
milks her cow by hand in the paddock
daily and Leo tends an amazing large
vegetable garden which he has built
up from his own composting over
12 years. He uses heritage seed and

plants plenty to allow for caterpillars,
drought, birds and diseases to take

their seasonal share.

You can see that my initial anticipation

was surely fulfilled in so many ways.

More photos on P20 19

A subtropical oasis near Kerikeri...

Billbergia2015 Bromeliad
21st/22nd February

Neoregelia

Some brand new hybrids created by Peter Coyle...

Neoregelia 'Totara Cherry Opal' (A midi) Neoregelia 'Totara Fireworks'

Neoregelia 'Totara Scream' Neoregelia 'Totara Checkerboard' Neoregelia 'Totara
Yellow Ribbon'

Neoregelia (unnamed) Neoregelia (unnamed)

Neoregelia 'Totara Sammy
Lee' – named for an
Australian friend,
Samantha Lee.
Billbergia
'Totara Bouncer'

Billbergia
'Totara AlpineVista'

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – February 2015 issue

CONTENTS
President's Page – Graeme Barclay 4
Bromeliad Society January meeting news – Dave Anderson 5
'Special Species' spotlight – Graeme Barclay 8
Schedule of plants for 'Monthly Choice' 10
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 11
Of cars, birds... and broms – Erin Titmus 12
Another look at the Whangarei Quarry Gardens – Diana Holt 14
Group News 16
Learning about the genera: Peter Waters on Billbergia 17

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 16 for details of group meeting

times and venues.

FEBRUARY
21st/22nd 'Fiesta' Show, Competition
and Plant Sale at Mt Eden War Memorial
Hall, 489 Dominion Road, Balmoral,
Auckland. 9.00am to 3.00pm both days.

24th Society monthly meeting at

Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
The Monthly Choice competition: New
Zealand Neoregelia hybrids. There will
be a review of plants from the 'Fiesta'
Show and we will also be discussing
New Zealand Neoregelia hybrids.

MARCH

1st South Auckland Group bus trip to

Hamilton
24th Society monthly meeting at

Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
This is our AGM. The Monthly Choice
competition: Guzmania. There will also
be a talk on guzmanias.

FRONT COVER AND INSIDE FRONT COVER:

At our February Society meeting we are focusing on New Zealand Neoregelia
hybrids so in the Journal this month we are taking the opportunity to profile some
of Peter Coyle's new creations. The stunning front cover plant is 'midi' sized and
was unnamed but, appropriately, as from now it will be called Neoregelia 'Totara
Front Cover'. On the inside front cover we feature some more of Peter's Neoregelia
hybrids and also a couple of his Billbergia creations. The genus Billbergia is the
subject of our 'Learning about the genera' article by Peter Waters, starting on page

17.

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Hi everyone,

Well it's 'Fiesta' time again,
how the months and years are flying
by. While it's hot, dry and sometimes
sickeningly humid at nights, this is
my favourite month of the year, as I
know the 'Fiesta' is not too far away.
I also know we'll be treated to some
fabulous show plants – not to mention
snaffling a few more treasures for
our collections from the sales tables.

It's worth stopping for a moment to

ponder what we as a Society actually
manage to put on each year with our

'Fiesta'. The dedicated committee,
helpers, sellers and plant exhibitors

that put a huge effort in over the three

days, as well as all the preparation and
organising prior, is a great testament to
all the helpful, diligent and experienced
members we have. Everyone has their
job and pitches in without a fuss – the
result is a competitive bromeliad show
that I am frequently told is one of the
best – if not THE BEST – regular show
in the world. Not too bad for little old
New Zealand!

My point is, if you haven't been along
to the 'Fiesta' in a year or two, please
come along to enjoy it and support your
Society. We are extremely lucky to
have such a wonderful bromeliad event

each year – there is always something

to see and learn and photograph

and wish for... and of course buy.

At our regular Society meeting this

month on February 24th, we are
focusing on New Zealand Neoregelia
hybrids, which is also our 'Monthly
Choice'subject and is sure to showcase
some outstanding creations, both old
and new. This means any Neoregelia
'hybridized in NZ'. It does not have
to have been made by you in order to
bring it along.

We will be discussing many of the

plants on display and also looking

in depth at some of the hybridiser's
'theory'and the work behind the scenes
required to produce these plants. We
are very lucky to have a number of
current top-class Neo hybridisers in
our midst, (as well as a few learners
like myself), who will be present on
the night, so this will certainly be an
exciting 'not-to-be-missed' meeting.

Finally, for those of you who have

your Journal on the eve of the 'Fiesta'

– best of luck to all the competitors
in the show, and thanks again for
making it happen... See you all there.
And don't forget... clean pots!

Graeme

REMINDER...

Plant entries for the 'Fiesta' Competitive Show will be accepted between
1.00pm and 5.00pm only on Friday 20th February.

Bromeliad Society
January Meeting News – Dave Anderson

President Graeme Barclay chaired
the meeting and welcomed
members and Nigel Thomson,
visiting us from Australia. The 'Fiesta'
Show and Sale this year will be held on
the weekend of February 21st and 22nd.
Graeme said to let him know if you
were intending to sell plants or help
during the three days. Lester will be
supervising the table layout this year.
The AGM is only two months away
so please consider standing for the
committee. The annual subscriptions
are due at the end of February with a
$5 discount applying to those who pay
before the end of the month. Lastly
there was a tea towel left behind after
the Christmas supper last November so
please contact Graeme if you think it
is yours.

Nigel Thomson then gave a brief talk
on the upcoming 19th Australasian
Bromeliad Conference – 31st March to

2nd April 2017. The conference venue is
the Events Centre, Caloundra, situated

on the southern part of the Sunshine

Coast, Queensland approximately
95km north of Brisbane. Further
information on this conference will be
published in the journal as it comes to
hand.

Peter Waters once again took us

through the 'Show & Tell' plants. First

up for display was the green leafed
Tillandsia laxissima with its tall spike

of pretty small blue flowers. Peter

mentioned in passing that the proposed

name changes of various genera
including the green leafed tillandsias

and grey leafed vrieseas may be
published shortly. Next, and wanting a
name, was an Aechmea recurvata or a
hybrid of it. For display was a clump

of the species Vriesea mollis with three

colourful spikes fully out. This plant
is quite similar to Vriesea delicatula
but differing from it by having a black
colouration to the base of the leaves.

Peter then had for display a few

vriesea species and hybrids that had
spotted leaves. First was the common

Vriesea guttata that colours up well
in high light and has a pendulous

pink spike with yellow flowers. Next
was a vriesea hybrid that was made
by the late Laurie Dephoff with its
parents possibly being Vriesea guttata
x gigantea – it had the guttata spots on
the striped leaves. Vriesea capixabae
has spotting similar to Vriesea guttata

but is a smaller plant that has a pink

coloured pendulous and more open

flower spike. Finally Vriesea pardalina

a species with less spotting and a larger

and paler pink spike that requires

warmer conditions to grow than the

afore mentioned vrieseas.

A plant wrongly named as a neoregelia

was identified as Aechmea racinae
that has been in NZ many decades.
Three different plants all labelled
Tillandsia 'Maya' were displayed. Two

of the grey leafed plants had narrower
leaves compared to the third plant

Cont'd P6

Cont'd from P5 – Bromeliad Society Meeting News

– a descendant of the one originally
Tillandsia
xerographica x capitata) is

large plant some 50cm high with soft

Waters gave an informative talk on the
rules for the Annual Show Competition

classes at the show; then gave a talk

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First Graeme
Barclay with Quesnelia

with xNidumea 'Midnight'– a most

competition were Aechmea fasciata
nudicaulis aequalis
fraseri; Alcantarea nevaresii;
Nidularium 'Chantrieri' xNidumea
'Midnight'; Vriesea 'White Lightning'
and fenestralis

Open Foliage:
with a Vriesea

coloured leaves and deservedly voted

Judy Graham with xCanmea 'Wild

H
Aechmea fasciataorlandiana
Billbergia

xCanmea – Canistrum triangulare
Aechmea 'Bert'; Neoregelia

Vriesea

Tillandsia:
Tillandsia hondurensis
Judy Graham with Tillandsia disticha
Tillandsia
brachycaulosx correaleiharrisii and
streptophylla.

Neoregelia:

with the very attractive Neoregelia

with Neoregelia
Neoregelia

carcharodon carolinae

G

Named Monthly Plant Billbergia:

First was Judy Graham with Billbergia

Peter Coyle with Billbergia 'Kawana
Moondrops'.
were Billbergia rosea

Coyle with the very attractive Vriesea

NEXT MEETING: th

Photos from January
monthly meeting...

1

Billbergia

Tillandsia hondurensis

Quesnelia

Vriesea

Neoregelia

xCanmea

Tillandsia disticha

By Graeme Barclay
Billbergias are the subject for our 'Learning about the genera' Journal article
this month, so let's also take a close look at an interesting variegated species.

Billbergia 'Kyoto'

7his Billbergia has a somewhat

species Billbergia pyramidalis var.
concolor

occurred as a seedling mutation from a

plant cell material from a single plant

conditions to mass produce identical

appeared there as a sport mutation offset

Billbegia¶
(

is that a variegated seedling or pup

and thus nurtured to maturity with

of white variegation are generally few-

known as Billbergia pyramidalis var.
striata

Billbergia pyramidalis

Billbergia
pyramidalis var. concolor has wholly
Billbergia

violet and yellow colours to the petal

more so Billbergia

common cultivar overseas that is

Billbergia

and fed diligently in order to grow and

carefully and make sure you take good

To help you prepare your plants for our
Society 'Monthly Choice' competitions...

Here's a 'heads up' on what is coming up at our Society

monthly meetings so you can start planning to bring along
your special plants and wow us all!

'MONTHLY CHOiCE' SCHEDuLE:
February: New Zealand Neoregelia hybrids
March: Guzmania

10
Reminder... Society subscriptions are now due
for the March 2015 to February 2016 year.
Members who joined the Society after November 1st 2014
are financial for the coming year.
You can pay by internet banking – the Society's account details are:
03-0227-0071516-00
Please be sure to include your name and detail for identification.
Or, you can pay by cheque direct to the Treasurer at the monthly meeting or mail to:
Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012.
......................................................
Single memberShip $35.00 (reduced to $30.00 if paid by 28.2.15)
Second and further memberS at Same addreSS $10.00 each
April: Nidularium
May: Bigeneric plants
June: Neoregelia lilliputiana and hybrids

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153 Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272 Committee: Lester Ching 09-576 4595

Don Brown 09-361 6175 Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671 David Cowie 09-630 8220
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616 Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt, Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month

Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

'Buy & Swap'

Listings in 'Buy & Swap' are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Of cars, birds... and broms

– Erin Titmus
N

let me introduce Peter and

and Pam moved there from Kaitaia in

to see them and in 2003 The Parrot
Place

resplendent with complementary

property which still runs as a local

to house his remaining classic cars

Over the following two and a half years

raised areas that form sweeping garden

digger and the garden was planted out

are the sun-tolerant tree ferns from
New Guinea that provide the perfect

fronds and there are some unusual

Peter says that he 'learned a lot'

Neoregelia
'Scarlet Charlotte' and Neoregelia

at the Far North Bromeliad Group

Peter's 'man cave'...

area further enhances the microclimate

demonstrates that Peter is a respected
plantsman with his collection of

13Of cars, birds... and broms

Whangarei Subtropical Quarry Gardens...

14

Another look at the inspirational
Whangarei Subtropical Quarry Gardens

– Diana Holt
With my move north of

Horticulture Society as a
way to meet like-minded folks and a

On one of our trips recently we headed
off further north to the Whangarei area
where we spent time at the Whangarei

area into walks with many interesting

Sloping uphill with interconnecting

carefully set up in groups depending

Some that could take more sun were set
up accordingly where the shade loving
ones were well tucked in to deeper

levels giving a very natural look to the

The members from the Northland
Bromeliad Group who were
responsible in setting up and
maintaining this garden have done
an incredible job. The quarry
showcases the plants beautifully.

As Whangarei is only a two hour

make a great day out to travel north to
visit the gardens plus there are many
other interesting places to visit on the

Editor's note:

The beginnings of the gardens date
back to 1990 when an enthusiastic
local group of volunteers approached
the local Council to negotiate the
formation of a public gardens on an
old quarry site that had been closed
since1974. Work on the transformation
and development of the project started
in 1998.

This is actually the third article we have
run in the Journal on the Whangarei
Subtropical Quarry Gardens. Readers

about the history and establishment
of this special place can refer back to
our August 2010 and July 2013 issues
where there are articles by Erin Titmus
and Sandra Wheeler respectively and
lots more excellent photos of the garden
by Colin Symonds. You can also go to
www.whangareiquarrygardens.org.nz

Group News

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
Our February meeting was at the beautiful
garden of Ann and Graham Thomson in
Te Toro. Since our last visit Ann and
Graham have done considerable work
and the garden is now well established.
The palm trees have given the garden
just the right amount of shade, the under
planting has been carefully chosen, and

all the various waterfalls and lily ponds

make it a very tranquil and peaceful
place. It was hard to believe that this lush

tropical garden is hidden away from the

surrounding fields. It is a credit to their
hard work and creativity.

Marie Healey reminded members
that there are still seats on the bus to
Hamilton Gardens (which recently won
an International Award) on 1st March.
If any members are interested and wish
to bring a friend or friends please call
Margaret Kitcher on 09-235 7235. This
should be a fun day.

The raffles were won by Lyn Hoeberger,
Lois Phillips and Margaret Flanagan.
The continuous raffles were won by
John Muddiman, Birgit Rhode, Judy
Graham, Roy Morton, Fay Cox, Pamela
Muddiman, and Kathleen Carter.
Our March meeting has been replaced by
the bus trip to Hamilton.

Hawke's Bay Bromeliad Group

– Pieter Franklin
We had our last meeting for 2014 in late

November, with attendance a bit smaller
than usual. We started with a great lunch
and raffles followed. We did not have a

sales table or a competition but a silent
auction was well received. Our guest
speaker Andrew Flower, from Anwyl
Bromeliads, gave a most interesting and
informative talk on Tillandsia, giving us
a far better understanding of these great
plants. He had examples of plants and
we had follow up from members on how
much they enjoyed Andrew's talk. We
were able to purchase a variety of his
plants and members took full advantage.
Thanks to Linda Wong and Margaret

Bluck and others for their sterling work
preparing dinner and to the committee

for the overall organisation.

Next Meeting: April 1st, St John Hall
Taradale, preceded by a garden visit at
2 pm, phone 06-836 7331 for details.

Tillandsia Group – Lester Ching

Thanks to Peter and Jocelyn Coyle for our
February meeting venue. Eleven people
attended. We discussed T. tectorum, and
a comparison was made with T. paleacea

which has a different flower. Also a 'Te
Ngakau' (a cross between T. velutina and

T. bradeana which turn red courtesy of
the sun). This was well grown but green
due to the lack of sunshine.

Win Shorrock brought a plant to be
named. It was a T. tricolor, We also
discussed a dark T. stricta with soft

leaves, a T. floribunda, a thick hank of

T. usneoides and a flowering T. capitata.
Peter showed his collection of tillandsias

including hybrids and species.

Next Meeting: April 12th at 1pm

at Nancy Murphy's 'Ohaunui',
104 McGowan Road, Waiuku.

Learning about the genera : Billbergia
– Peter Waters
Billbergia consists of 66 species at the present time and is divided into two
subgenera. Subgenus Billbergia is the most common in cultivation and
practically all species come from Brazil with one also in Uruguay, Paraguay
and Argentina, and one other in Central America. Subgenus Helicodea is

scattered throughout Central and South America. The defining difference

is in the petals. Helicodea is known as the 'watchspring billbergias' and the

petals coil into a tight helicoid spiral during flowering and afterwards.

Named for Gustav Billberg,
a Swedish botanist and first
described in 1821, billbergias
were the first bromeliads to be
cultivated in the United States with
Billbergia pyramidalis leading the
way. Billbergias are usually epiphytic
although some do grow terrestrially.
They are arguably the fastest growing
of all bromeliads. Practically all are
tall, tubular plants with few leaves
with the ability to store water for
long periods because of the narrow
entrance which restricts evaporation.
The inflorescences have pink or red
scape bracts and a variety of different
coloured flowers. Usually pendulous
with a few erect they are very beautiful,
but the drawback is that they are short-
lived, lasting only one to two weeks.

Billbergias are very easy to hybridise
and so the majority of plants found in
collections today are probably hybrids.
Mainly because they tend to be more
colourful and attractive, but there
are still some common species about
although it is becoming more difficult
to identify them positively. Most of
the hybrids have been created with
parents of Billbergia amoena, vittata,

distachia, saundersii or euphemiae.
Many Billbergia species tend to be
rather unexciting in appearance and

the interest in this genus was somewhat
lacking until Don Beadle came on the

scene. Originally from Texas he started
to make Billbergia hybrids because
nobody else was doing that, and he
gradually built up a collection that
attracted more interest in the genus.

After moving to Florida and setting
up a nursery in Venice he continued

to produce exciting plants using

Billbergia 'Domingos Martins' as one

of the main parents. He eventually

retired and sold to Michael Kiehl who
continued to propagate and sell his

Billbergia collection.

Cultivation requirements are simple.

Good light and ventilation is essential
and plenty of water during the spring

and summer. Fertilisation can help
with offsets but be wary of too much

nitrogen as they can turn green and

strappy almost overnight. While a few
are quite hardy, the majority don't like
frosts so are better under plastic or some
cover during the winter. Subgenus

Billbergia are generally easier to grow
in New Zealand. Helicodea are more

Cont'd P18 17

Cont'd from P17– Learning about the genera: Billbergia

Billbergia amoena is common in New

Billbergia amoena var rubra is now
treated as a synonym of amoena var
amoena

Billbergia amoena var viridis is so

most colourful of the species with

are B. amoena var stoloniferacarnea
and robertiana

Billbergia vittata

revolutionised Billbergia

Billbergia

Billbergia vittata can
Billbergia

brasiliensis

Billbergia distachia is a medium

petals which may or may not have

Q var maculata

Billbergia saundersii is a tall very

called Billbergia chlorosticta and

species Billbergia debilis is considered
synonymous with saundersii
look distinctly different in foliage

Billbergia leptopoda is a small plant

much like Quesnelia

Billbergia iridifolia is another small

leptopoda

Billbergia horrida is named for the
large dark spines on the leaves and is

Billbergia 'Muriel Waterman' named

Billbergia horrida var tigrina differs

Billbergia sanderiana

green leaved plant with prominent

Billbergia
elegans which is somewhat similar in

Billbergia pyramidalis

uninteresting foliage of plain green

Billbergia pyramidalis var concolor

Billbergia euphemiae is a stoloniferous
medium vase shaped plant with pink

Billbergia alfonsi-joannis is a
spectacular large green plant with
heavily spined green leaves and one

and rosy pink and the petals greenish

Billbergia brasiliensis
Billbergia

Helicodea

narrow with pointed leaves which also
look more like one of the Helicodea

Billbergia zebrina is a watchspring

a metre tall and a striking pendent

Helicodea the stem has a white powder

Billbergia rosea formerly known
as Billbergia venezuelana also

unfortunately as it comes from

Billbergia chlorantha
decoraelegansfosteriana
lietzeilymaniimacrocalyxmanarae
meyeri nana porteana
and stenopetala

More photos on P20
Billbergia zebrina.

Billbergia alfonsi-joannis

Billbergia sanderiana

Billbergia rosea

Billbergia meyeri

More Billbergia photos...

 Vriesea 'Hunua Falls' – Peter Coyle.
'Champion of the Show' – Fiesta 2015
• Fiesta 2015 show results and photos
• Learning about the genera: Werauhia

Bromeliad Society February

Meeting News – Notes and photos by Dave Anderson

President Graeme Barclay welcomed
members and visitors including
two new members who had joined
at the 'Fiesta'. Graeme thanked all
those members who had worked at the
'Fiesta' and helped make it the success
it was. The overall quality of the show
plants this year was excellent. We also
had Narelle Aizlewood, from Australia,
(a qualified BSI judge) assisting the
judging team. A special thanks to Narelle
for her contribution. The trophies for the
various class winners will be presented
next month. Lastly from the 'Fiesta', Lester
Ching has lost a Tupperware container
from the kitchen so if you have accidently
picked it up on Sunday would you please
bring it to the next monthly meeting.

Guzmania 'Red Parrot' – Peter Coyle.
First in open flowering section and'Plant of the Month'
The AGM will be held next month on
March 24th at 7.30pm. We would especially
like to have more women on the committee
so please consider becoming a committee
member so that you can help your society.
The monthly meeting will follow the
AGM.

Peter Waters once again took us through

the 'Show and Tell' plants. First up

Vriesea 'Pacific Blush' x
'Hunua Embers' – John Mitchell.
First in open foliage section
Neoregelia 'Harlequin' – Judy Graham.
First in neoregelia section
Neoregelia 'Totara Gold' – Peter Coyle.
First in named monthly plant section

for display were two plants Catopsis
berteroniana and Catopsis paniculata with

their white/yellow flowers and soft green

leaves covered with white powder. Next
were three wrongly named plants labelled
Tillandsia guatemalensis. Tillandsia
guatemalensis has rather wide spotted

leaves with a flower spike that can be up to

1m tall. The plants on display had relatively
narrow leaves and were most probably
Tillandsia leiboldiana with one of them
with plain green leaves possibly being
Tillandsia guatemalensis x gymnobotrya.
Next were two highly coloured plants
some two years old of Neoregelia 'Black
Beauty' F2 that had been grown in high

light. A plant brought in for identification

was Aechmea 'Rajah' – a Hummel hybrid
from the 1970s that has leaves which are
green on the top surface and a rich maroon
to the underside. Lastly was a plant from
the Alcantarea extensa (group) that had a
viviparous pup growing near the top of the

flower spike. The plant was from the seed
of an alcantarea that flowered in Auckland
in 2003. It had previously been wrongly

named as Alcantarea nahoumii so if you
do have one of these plants please give it
the correct name.

The special raffle was won by Andrew

Maloy. The door prizes went to Graeme
Barclay, Andrew Devonshire and David
Cowie.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First was Peter Coyle
with a Guzmania 'Red Parrot' that was also

voted plant of the month. Second was Bev

Ching with Guzmania bismarckii. Also in
the competition were Billbergia 'Totara
Apache'; Hohenbergia burle-marxii;
Guzmania wittmackii; Neoregelia brownii;
Nidularium 'Madonna' Vriesea ospinae
x 'Tiger Tim', flammea and ospinae var.
ospinae.

Open Foliage: John Mitchell was first
with his Vriesea 'Pacific Blush' x 'Hunua
Embers'. Judy Graham was second

with Aechmea 'Ensign' x Canistrum
triangulare. In the competition were
Billbergia 'Bromel-La' x 'Cold Fusion';
Neoregelia 'Totara Sun Tiger'; Vriesea

'Crimson Bling' hybrid, 'Chestnut Wave'
hybrid, 'Tasman' hybrid and 'Ruby Blush'
hybrid.

Tillandsia: Lynette Nash was first with

a mounted clump of Tillandsia ionantha.
Second was Judy Graham with Tillandsia
streptophylla. There were also on the table
Tillandsia flagellata, ionantha, lorentziana,
streptophylla, tectorum and xerographica.

Neoregelia: Judy Graham was first with

Neoregelia 'Harlequin' and Graeme
Barclay second with a Neoregelia 'Life
Force'. In the competition were Neoregelia
'Bitzer' x 'Rainbow', 'Burnsies Spiral',

'Nova', 'Painted Delight', 'Perfection'
x 'Fools Gold', 'Tara Red Rascal', 'Tara

Skyrocket', 'Tom Tom' x 'Rafa' and

'Totara Cat Fever'.

Named Monthly Plant (NZ Neoregelia
hybrids): First was Peter Coyle with

Neoregelia 'Totara Gold'. Second equal
were Peter Waters with Neoregelia 'Tawa
Tiger' and Graeme Barclay with 'Wee
Willy' x 'Tiger' . In the competition
were Neoregelia 'Grace's Avalanche' x

'Punctate Red', 'Spotted Devil' x 'Skotaks

Tiger', 'Poppy Fuller No 2', 'Wild Tiger'
x ampullacea, and (C x C) x (BH x T) x
'Tiger'.

The Plant of the month went to Peter Coyle
with Guzmania 'Red Parrot'.
Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING: Tues 26th March.

NOTICE OF SPECIAL

GENERAL MEETING:

Would members please note that there

will be a special general meeting on

April 28th, prior to our normal monthly

meeting, to formally present the Society's

accounts for the latest financial year.

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – March 2015 issue

CONTENTS
Bromeliad Society February meeting news – Dave Anderson 2
2015 Bromeliad 'Fiesta' photos – Andrew Devonshire 5
In unexpected places – Erin Titmus 8
'Fiesta' Show results... trophy and class winners 10
'Fiesta Judges' Report – Dave Anderson 12
President's Page – Graeme Barclay 13
Group News 14
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 16
'Special Species Spotlight' – Graeme Barclay 17
The Coromandel group visit Waiuku and Pukekohe – Kay Steen 18
Learning about the genera: Werauhia – Graeme Barclay 22

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and

do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 14 for details of group meeting

times and venues.

MARCH
24th Society monthly meeting at

Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
This is our AGM. The Monthly Choice
competition: Guzmania. There will also
be a talk on guzmanias.

APRIL

5th South Auckland Group meeting
12th South Auckland Group Display and
Sale. See the advertisement on page 14.

19th Eastern BOP Group meeting

26th Hawkes Bay Group meeting and
AGM

28th Society monthly meeting at

Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
The monthly meeting will be preceded

by a short Special General Meeting to
formally present the Society's annual
financial statements. The Monthly

Choice competition: Nidularium. There
will be a PowerPoint presentation on the
'Bromsmatta' Australasian bromeliad
conference.

FRONT COVER:

It's that time of the year again when we get to show you some of the wonderful

plants that were on show at 'Fiesta' 2015. Many thanks to Andrew Devonshire for
his expertise in photographing the plants. Our front cover features the 'Champion
of the Show' – Vriesea 'Hunua Falls' – Peter Coyle. Our coverage of 'Fiesta' 2015
starts on page 5.

PHOTOS BY ANDREW DEVONSHIRE
BEST BILLBERGIA Peter CoyleBillbergia 'Totara Lab 89'
BEST AECHMEA AND BEST
BROMELIAD SPECIES – David Cowie
Aechmea nudicaulis var capitata
BEST GuzMANIA Andrew MaloyGuzmania lindenii
BEST NEOREGELIA – Diana Holt
Neoregelia 'Tara Tiger
BEST TILLANDSIA – Lynette Nash

Tillandsia duratii var. saxatilis

More photos on P6 and P7

BEST ARTISTIC ARRANGEMENT
– Betty Goss
FIRST IN NEOREGELIA CLASS
Graeme Barclay – Neoregelia 'Lion King'
BEST VRIESEA AND 'CHAMPION
OF THE SHOW' – Peter CoyleVriesea 'Hunua Falls'
FIRST IN AECHMEA CLASS
Peter Coyle – Aechmea 'Fia'
(albomarginated)
BEST N.z. HYBRID – Rhonda MaloyVriesea 'Pacific Kandy'
BEST BROMELIAD ARRANGEMENT

– Judy Graham

SECOND IN CRYPTANTHuS AND
ORTHOPHYTuM CLASS
Peter Waters – Orthophytum magalhaesii
FIRST IN CRYPTANTHuS AND
ORTHOPHYTuM CLASS
Peter Coyle – Cryptanthus zonatus
FIRST IN NIDuLARIOIDES CLASS
Graeme Barclay – Nidularium
cariacicaense
FIRST IN TILLANDSIA SMALL
BLOOMING CLASS
Lester Ching – Tillandsia streptophylla
FIRST TILLANDSIA SMALL
FOLIAGE CLASS
Peter Waters – Tillandsia atroviridipetala
var longepedunculata
FIRST IN BIGENERIC OR OTHER
uNLISTED GENuS CLASS
John Mitchell – xCanmea (Canistrum
triangulare x Aechmea 'Bert')
FIRST IN PITCAIRNIOIDEAE CLASS
Andrew Devonshire – Dyckia delicata

In unexpected places...
– Article and photos by Erin Titmus
In September 2014 as I was touring oasis perched on a peninsula at the
the celtic isles I was intrigued to edge of Loch Ewe', in the north of
read in my itinerary of Inverewe Scotland! Could this be so? Would
Garden and Estate, 'a lush tropical there be any bromeliads?

The diversion north through Wester
Ross was spectacular scenery and

when I arrived at the entrance to this
National Trust for Scotland venue I

was excited to see a very large clump
of Fascicularia pitcairnifolia with
bright red centre leaves and purple

flowers looking showy in front of a
silvery clump of New Zealand astelia.

The extensive gardens, started by
Osgood Mackenzie in 1862, are well
worth the detour. But there was not
much in the way of sub-tropical growth

as I would think of it... more like the
plants I expect to see growing in our

deep south. There were the spectacular
walled gardens, terraced with fruit,

veges and flowering plants, and

meandering tracks on the peninsula led
to various plantings, ponds, themed
areas and huge perennial borders. On
the hillside above the walled garden

I found a big drift of Fascicularia
pitcairnifolia, this time in front of

New Zealand flaxes. There was just

one ginger plant nearby.

It was not until I made my way

back behind the house, past the

Bambooselem and the young Wollemi

pines, that I stumbled on the 'America'
walk. And here were the broms! Set on

the sunny upper shelf with large rocky
terracing, hardy ochagavias and puyas
seemed to be thriving and clumping
happily. They provided a showy drift
of varying shades of spikey silvery
rosettes. Named plants included

Ochagavia lindleyana, Puya alpestris,
Puya chilensis, Puya coerulea, Puya
gilmartiniae, and Puya venusta. All
originate from Chile where they are
used to harsh environments.

Inverewe shares a similar latitude to St
Petersburg (58° N), but it is the North
Atlantic Drift current that gives the

western coasts of Ireland and Scotland

their milder, humid weather that is so
different.

So, if we consider our deep south, only
latitude 46° S, and the landlocked cold
winters of central Otago I wonder how

many gardeners are growing these

bromeliad genera there? It would

be great to hear news from people
growing broms in the more southern
areas of our country.

Our next monthly meeting on Tuesday
March 24th is also our AGM.

It would be great to have a really good
attendance of members at this important
meeting. Please be involved with your Society!

2015 ANNUAL SHOW
TROPHY WINNERS

Best Aechmea David Cowie – Aechmea nudicaulis var capitata
Best Billbergia Peter Coyle – Billbergia 'Totara Lab 89'
Best Guzmania Andrew Maloy – Guzmania lindenii
Best Neoregelia Diana Holt – Neoregelia 'Tara Tiger'
Best Tillandsia Lynette Nash – Tillandsia duratii var. saxatilis
Best Vriesea Peter Coyle – Vriesea 'Hunua Falls'
Best N.z. Hybrid Rhonda Maloy – Vriesea 'Pacific Kandy'
Best Bromeliad species David Cowie – Aechmea nudicaulis var capitata
Best Bromeliad Arrangement Judy Graham
Best Artistic Arrangement Betty Goss
Most Points of the Show Peter Coyle
Champion of the Show Peter Coyle – Vriesea 'Hunua Falls'

2015 ANNUAL SHOW CLASS WINNERS

Class 1 – Aechmea Class 6 – Bromeliad Species

1st Peter Coyle Aechmea 'Fia' 1st David Cowie Aechmea nudicaulis
(albomarginated) var capitata
2nd Peter Coyle Aechmea fasciata 2nd Graeme Barclay Canistrum 'Vania Leme'
(variegated) 3rd Peter Coyle Quesnelia marmorata 'Tim Plowman'
3rd David Cowie Aechmea nudicaulis 'Parati'

Class 7 – Neoregelia
Class 3 – Billbergia1st Graeme Barclay Neoregelia 'Lion King'
1st Peter Coyle Billbergia 'Totara Lab 89' 2nd Graeme Barclay Neoregelia 'Scar'
2nd John Michell Billbergia 'Hunua Risotto' 3rd Andrew Devonshire Neoregelia [(carolinae
3rd Peter Waters Billbergia 'Pop Rock' x concentrica) x

('Bobbie Hull' x
Class 4 – Cryptanthus and Orthophytum 'Skotaks Tiger')] x
1st Peter Coyle Cryptanthus zonatus 'Hannibal Lector' F2
2nd Peter Waters Orthophytum magalhaesii
3rd Lester Ching Cryptanthus 'Pink Class 9 – Nidularioides

Starlight' 1st Graeme Barclay Nidularium cariacicaense

2nd Graeme Barclay Nidularium atalaiaense
Class 5 – Guzmania 3rd Judy Graham Canistrum triangulare
1st Andrew Maloy Guzmania lindenii

Class 10 – Tillandsia Small Blooming Class 21 – Pitcairnioideae

1st Lester Ching Tillandsia streptophylla 1st Andrew Devonshire Dyckia delicata
2nd Lester Ching Tillandsia tectorum 2nd Andrew Devonshire Dyckia 'Marama'
3rd Lynette Nash Tillandsia 'Enano'

Class 23 – Dish or tray garden
Class 11 – Tillandsia Small Foliage or novelty planting

1st Peter Waters Tillandsia atroviridipetala 1st Judy Graham

var longepedunculata 2nd Betty Goss
2nd Lynette Nash Tillandsia funckiana 3rd Graeme Barclay
3rd Lynette Nash Tillandsia

atroviridipetala Class 24 – Bromeliad arrangement

1st Judy Graham
Class 14 – Tillandsia Large Blooming 2nd Judy Graham
1st Lynette Nash Tillandsia incarnata 3rd Lynette Nash
2nd Lynette Nash Tillandsia disticha 'Major'
3rd Dave Dawson Tillandsia lorentziana Class 25 – Artistic or floral arrangement

1st Betty Goss
Class 15 – Tillandsia Large Foliage 2nd Lynette Nash
1st Lynette Nash Tillandsia duratii var. 3rd Lynette Nash

saxatilis
2nd Win Shorrock Tillandsia tectorum Class 26 – Decorative container
3rd Judy Graham Tillandsia tectorum 1st Lynette Nash

2nd David Goss
Class 16 – Vriesea Blooming 3rd= Win Shorrock
1st David Cowie Vriesea aff. Lubbersii 3rd= Win Shorrock
2nd Lester Ching Vriesea ospinae
3rd Graeme Barclay Vriesea friburgensis var. Class 27 – Hanging container

tucumanensis 1st Peter Coyle Neoregelia 'Groucho'

2nd Diana Holt Neoregelia 'Tara Red
Class 17 – Vriesea Foliage Rascal'
1st Peter Coyle Vriesea 'Hunua Falls' 3rd Andrew Devonshire Neoregelia ('Tascha
2nd John Mitchell Vriesea 'Dark Knight' x x Clarise') x 'Golden

'Snowman' Pheasant'
3rd= Peter Coyle Vriesea 'Solar Flare'
3rd = Rhonda Maloy Vriesea 'Autumn Palette' Class 28 – New zealand Hybrid

1st Rhonda Maloy Vriesea 'Pacific
Class 18 – Bigeneric or other unlisted genus Kandy'

1st John Mitchell xCanmea (Canistrum (Andrew Maloy)
triangulare x Aechmea 2nd Rhonda Maloy Vriesea 'Crimson
'Bert') Autumn'

2nd Graeme Barclay xCanmea 'Hunua (Andrew Maloy)
Serpent' 3rd= Andrew Maloy Vriesea 'Mystic
3rd Andrew Maloy Alcantarea 'Red Ensign' Tango'

(Andrew Maloy)
Class 19 – Miniature bromeliad 3rd= John Mitchell xCanmea (Aechmea
1st Peter Coyle Neoregelia 'Totara 'Ensign' x Canistrum

Ace High' triangulare)
2nd Diana Holt Neoregelia 'Tara (John Mitchell)
Sky Rocket'
3rd Judy Graham Neoregelia lilliputiana Class 29 – Original Bromeliad Artwork

1st Andrew Devonshire
Class 20 – Variegated bromeliad 2nd Andrew Devonshire
1st Peter Coyle Quesnelia 'Rafael

Oliveira'
2nd Andrew Maloy Vriesea 'Kiwi Green
& Gold'
3rd Peter Waters Neoregelia 'Wow'

'FIESTA' 2015 Judges' Report

– Dave Anderson
This year we were very fortunate to
have had Narelle Aizlewood from
the Gold Coast, (a qualified BSI
judge), to assist with the judging of the
competition. The plants are judged to the
BSI rules as set out in their handbook.

Cultural perfection: Is the container
clean? Is the container chipped or
cracked? Is the container of the
appropriate size? Is the mix the right
depth and clean? Is the bromeliad centred
in the pot, straight and the correct depth?
Are the leaves damaged... slightly
or badly? Are the leaves trimmed...
expertly, poorly or drastically? Is leaf
removal complete? Is there excessive
removal of lower leaves? Do the

leaves have uneven growth, i.e. wide

and narrow areas? Are there elongated
leaves? Are there gaps between the
leaves? Are there folded or channelled
leaves? Are there mineral deposits,
water spots, algae, dust or debris?

Conformation: When viewed
from above does the plant appear

symmetrical? In profile, is the typical
shape of this plant present? Is the stem
straight? Has the cup been pulled off
centre? Has the natural contours of the

plant been destroyed by gaps between
the leaves, by too much leaf trimming,
by excessive or incomplete removal of

lower leaves? Are they the appropriate
shape, width and length? Is there the
correct number of leaves for this plant?

Colour and markings: Is the colour
maximal for this plant (variety)? Is the
colour faded or bleached out? Is the

colour evenly distributed? Is it lighter on
one side? Are there colour breaks? Is the
scurf marred and if so how extensively?

Are the bars, hieroglyphics, longitudinal
lines, brightly coloured leaf tips, which

are typical for this variety, present?
Are the markings clear and intense?
Are the markings evenly distributed?

Inflorescence: Is the size optimal,
small, average or immature? Evaluation
of quantity: Is the inflorescence well
branched? Are there mature flowers?

Evaluation of quality: Are the bracts

undamaged? Have the spent blooms
and bracts been removed? Has fallen
pollen been removed from the foliage?
Are the colours of the flowers bright
and not faded? Are the floral and scape
bract colours clear and not muddy?

Size: Is the size optimal, 3/4 grown, 1/2
grown, very immature, or overgrown?

In complete contrast, when plants are

voted on by members at our monthly
meetings, it is by and large the most
colourful plant that wins by popular
choice.

In general, the show entries were of a

very high standard. However there were
entries where the plants were poorly
presented. Before entering a plant all
competitors should consider the above
basic points that are used in judging.

Finally I would like to thank my fellow

judges, especially Narelle, the stewards
and to my wife Joan who always does a
superb job of writing up the cards.

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Hi everyone,

Another financial year for
our Society is nearing an end and
we have our AGM and election of
officers coming up on March 24th.
Unfortunately, that Tuesday night could
hopefully see our well-performing
'Black Caps' cricket team playing in
a World Cup semifinal at Eden Park.
I love my cricket and if we make it
into this match, I'll be recording the
second innings to watch when I get
home. So, rather than staying home on
the couch to watch it live, please do the
same and come along to the AGM and
enjoy your bromeliads. For those of
you living and travelling around Eden
Park, remember to plan your route,
as roads could be closed and traffic
heavy, especially around 10pm when
the match is scheduled to finish.

Our BSNZ 'Fiesta' Show and Sale last

month was another great event with
an excellent turn-out of the public to
see the show and buy plants. For those

who didn't make it, I hope you enjoy

the photos in this issue – there were

certainly some AMAZING broms on

show of an exceptionally high quality.
Thank you to the Northland Bromeliad
Group and those members from the Bay
of Plenty and further south who came

along and supported us. It really makes

a difference with your attendance and
plant purchases, which of course helps
fund our society to produce this Journal.

A special thanks once again to our
plant sellers and Auckland members

that helped out in various ways – great
job everyone. However, while the
plant quality was good, one thing we
can hopefully improve on for next year
is the number of entries in the show.
Total entries were down a little on
the last two years, with some classes

attracting very few specimens. So

please do think about making an effort
and entering even just a single plant or
arrangement in 2016, it really is great

fun to be part of the Show.

Finally, I have an exciting

announcement to make about a new
initiative we are trying out this year.
We will be running an 'Online Rare

Bromeliad Auction' on our BSNZ

website, probably in early June. This

will mean all BSNZ members from

around the country can simply log in

to the website and bid on plants. It will

be run over a set period of time (say

7 days), and will operate in a format

similar to the popular 'Trademe' online
auctions. We are still ironing out the
details and testing the software, but it's

looking good and I'm hopeful it should

work very well. This will be a fantastic
chance for members outside Auckland
to have access to buying – and even

selling – rare and desirable plants...

so keep your eye out in upcoming
Journals for more information on how
you can participate.

See you on the 24th and GO the 'Black
Caps'!

Graeme

Group News

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
For our March meeting we had a bus

trip to the Waikato and our first stop

was at Pounamu Greenstone where
many of the members partook of the
offerings.

We then headed south for a coffee
break at Riverhaven and went on to
Jenny Gallagher's garden on the banks
of the Waikato River. Jenny's garden
was immaculate, easy maintenance
and her bromeliads were thriving
despite the drought. After Jenny's we
headed to Hamilton Gardens and spent
a couple of hours there which really

was not long enough as there was so
much to see; no wonder they recently

received an International Award. The
Gardens are definitely worth another

trip, and for a longer period.

Our final call for the day was at the

Wairere Nursery where several of us
made purchases.

A very enjoyable day out.

The raffle was won by Adriane Moody.

Next Meeting: 1:30pm on Sunday,

5th April at Pearl and Herb Geange's

garden, 1 Idesia Place, The Gardens,

Manukau.

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad
and Orchid Group

– Alison Iremonger
Our first meeting for 2015 was hosted

by Ross and Gail Fergusson in their
award winning garden. We visit this
garden many times and each time it
looks spectacular. Thanks to you both
for sharing your passion with us. Ross
welcomed the 31 people present and
thanked the members who play a key
role in keeping the group together.

Guest speaker at the meeting was local
landscaper, Blair Dawson, who gave
us an informative and interesting talk
about what he does.

Ross reported on the stall that he
organised at the Ohope Craft Market
to advertise and promote our group.
We will have another stall later on in
the year. We have a selection of books
etc in our library which are available to
the members.

After a tea break we continued with

'Show and Tell' where members bring
along a plant. Raffles were drawn and
we finished with the sales table.

Competition results for 'A Bromeliad
Under 5 inches' were: 1st Alison
Iremonger, 2nd Gail Fergusson and 3rd
Alison Iremonger.

Next Meeting: Sunday 19th April.
Visitors are always welcome to
our meetings. Contacts – Maureen
Moffatt 07-3222276, Ross Fergusson

07-3125487 or Sue Laurent

07-3071323.

Hawke's Bay Bromeliad Group

– Julie Greenhill
Our first meeting for this year started

with a garden visit to the small but
action-packed back yard belonging to
Joe Tolentino and his family. Due to the
small area, miniatures dominate in his
collection, but his artistic arrangement
and clever space saving tricks make it
a visual feast for the bromeliad lover.
Afterwards, the small group attending
this month, moved on to our usual hall
where we had a short meeting and
were shown a technique for mounting

tillandsias that Suzanne Hampton

had been experimenting with. The
idea had been detailed in one of our
recent journals where a larger diameter
piece of branch is surrounded by
many smaller sticks and the plants
mounted on these so they can more
easily grip their new roots into all the

corrugations. Suzanne had made a few

for us to study and they all looked great
as a hanging piece particularly one that
had several small Tillandsia ionantha
'Rosita' glued on.

Competition:

Flowering: 1st Aechmea nudicaulis

Silver Streak – Pieter Franklin,

Non-Flowering: 1st Neoregelia
'Exotica Velvet' – Bill Young
Miniatures: 1st Neoregelia 'Pacifica' –
Julie Greenhill
Tillandsia: 1st Tillandsia harrisii –
Pieter Franklin

Next Meeting: AGM April 26th at

St. John Hall, Taradale, 2pm.

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153 Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272 Committee: Lester Ching 09-576 4595

Don Brown 09-361 6175 Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671 David Cowie 09-630 8220
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616 Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt, Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,

Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or

policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.

BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first

Tuesday of publication month

Display Advertising

Rates are:

Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

'Buy & Swap'

Listings in 'Buy & Swap' are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).

For advertising enquiries and material, please

contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366

or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Our subject this month was superbly grown by Peter Coyle to win the
'Best Variegated Bromeliad' class at our 2015 'Fiesta' show.

Quesnelia 'Rafael Oliveira'

This plant is a cultivar of the
species Quesnelia marmorata.
It is actually a variegated
clone of the unique and well
known curly-tipped marmorata
cultivar Quesnelia 'Tim Plowman'.

This variegated form was wild
collected in 1995 by Rafael Oliveira
de Faria in Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Rafael is well known for his ability
to collect variegated bromeliads
from habitat locations, often spying
them from great distances or locating
them high up in trees. The plant was
named Quesnelia 'Rafael Oliveira'

by Chester Skotak, who accompanied

Rafael on many expeditions.

Like Quesnelia 'Tim Plowman',
cultivation is quite easy, albeit it is a
little slower growing, due to the cream
coloured, widely variegated leaves.

Here's what I wrote in January 2014

about Quesnelia 'Tim Plowman':

'...the great thing about this plant is

that while it looks very fragile, it is
actually surprisingly tough and is easy

to grow in most environments. It will

do well in bright shade to full sun all

year round in New Zealand, both as

a potted specimen or mounted as an

epiphyte. It will also grow well in

chunky bark, pumice or scoria based
soils in the garden, or amongst rocks

where it can gain a firm foothold. The

trick to growing it well and obtaining
good curly form, is to pot single plants
in a large pot with a good amount of

Quesnelia 'Rafael Oliveira'
PHOTO: GRAHAM BARCLAY

slow release fertiliser applied in early
spring and give them plenty of light and
water. This pushes the plant to send out
pups during the warmer months rather

than flowering. Once the clump is well

established, cut back on the fertiliser
and water, which will hopefully then

start triggering flowering each year'

Water and fertiliser should be used
carefully with these quesnelias, as too
much can cause the leaves to lose their
'curl' and the plants can look washed
out, diminishing their marmorations.

Quesnelia 'Rafael Oliveira' is still

very rare here in New Zealand and a
pup will command a very high price!

Coromandel Peninsula Bromeliad
Group visit to Waiuku and Pukekohe

– Kay Steen
What a day we had. We
boarded the bus at Danby
Field, picked passengers
up from a couple of stops on the way,
and with Don and Marion to guide the
driver we set off.

With Margaret Kitcher

The hall across the road had been
opened for our convenience and after

Margaret's plants along the deck.
Margaret's treasures in the shadehouse.
a welcome coffee and rest stop we
ambled across the road to view her
garden. The front totally belies the

appeal in the back yard. It's gorgeous,

healthy, and very hearty. There were
pottery works to purchase, tillandsias
to titillate the mind, neoregelias to see
nurtured, and fruit trees and vegetables
to be envied. The pottery held an array
of plants hanging from the verandah,
and a couple of shade houses had other
brom treasures to be coveted. Plants

were bought and the bus began to fill

in our usual uninhibited way. We had
never viewed this garden before and

I tell you what, if you haven't then

you're missing something stunning.

On to our next stop...

With Judy Graham

Some of our group had been to her

garden before, not long after she
moved to this property. Judy's been

there five years now and the garden
reflects someone who's been there

much longer. The tall palms provide
a cool shelter for the myriad of
plants, bromeliads and otherwise, that
tastefully ramble their way around.
Not a blade of grass nor a stray leaf
dared to be out of place, such was the
manicured look. Once again the plants
were so healthy and lush, something
our district is lacking in with our

drought situation. I've not seen her

property before and went round and

round finding something new each

lap. The Tillandsia usneoides dripping
from the clothesline with a backdrop

18

Cont'd P22

Judy's Tillandsia usneoides
and Acacia Limelight. Judy's elves in grass.
Judy's manicured garden. Broms under palms at the Thompson's.
More photos on P20 19

A beautiful stream at Thompson's.
Thompson's park-like entrance.

Coromandel
Peninsula Bromeliad
Group garden visits...

– Photos by Kay Steen
Nancy's huge shadehouse.

Nancy's neos.
20

Cont'd from P18 – Coromandel Peninsula Bromeliad Group garden visits...

of Acacia 'Limelight', pottery elves
resting in the foliage, bromeliads in
pots and on stumps of wood lined and
hung from the fence up the driveway.
Other plants sat to attention in pots
along the wall of the house enjoying
the warmth the brick afforded them.
Judy had a few plants for sale which
were snapped up with delight. We also
enjoyed her very tasty pikelets with
jam and cream and a cool drink which
helped refresh us in the heat. After
drinking in the extravagance of this
garden we boarded our bus and were

transported to the next venue...

With Ann and Graham Thompson

George, the bus driver, carefully drove
down the driveway lined with palms.
This gave a feeling of entering some
tropical paradise and park rather than
a home garden. We had been here
before in the very early stages of its
gardening history. We were all looking
forward to seeing the changes and they
certainly didn't disappoint. Pathways
meandered around the house and
through the foliage beside the ponds,
along the grassy lawn and up beside

the flowing rocky stream. Bedding

plants populated the sides of the stream
and around the base of the many palms
adding colour to an otherwise green
landscape. Bridges allowed you to
criss-cross the water ways and amble
quietly around the different areas.
Bromeliads rested under palms looking
so relaxed and others sunbathed in the
heat of the day.

We had our lunch, did the raffle

with Anne winning a prize, and then
crowded into the area to purchase

plants. Back on the bus again...

With Nancy Murphy

This was one garden we were all keen
to see and once we arrived Nancy
apologised for the garden not being
in the best state as they had been
grappling with the shade house. Now

that's what I call a shade house. In
fact I think it was almost as big as the
house I live in! Not yet finished yet, the

shelves around the outside walls were
abundant with vrieseas, billbergias,
aechmeas, and other succulents that
enjoyed the tropical clime. The centre

was raised and filled with soil ready for
planting. I'd love to come back when
it's finished. It will be magic. It took

a while to look at all the plants and
wander out and around the grounds

just outside. At the beginning I didn't

realise how huge this property was.
There are 'garden rooms' everywhere
and it would be quite understandable if
someone got lost in their exploration.
The next hothouse we entered was
indeed hot. The huge windows were
open yet it didn't seem to alleviate the
heat. The neos were lined up here and
also the containers with vermiculite
where the new pups were resting to get
their root systems in place. The colours
of the neos were lovely. Once again
there were a few plants for sale which

were snapped up. Having taken our fill
and satisfied we had seen the best of all

these gardens we boarded our bus and
headed for home.

We really are grateful and thankful to
all the garden owners we visited. We
know it takes a lot to get gardens ready
and with the drought situation it wasn't
easy. From the Coromandel Peninsula
Bromeliad Group, we thank you all
from the bottom of our hearts.

Learning about the genera : Werauhia
– Graeme Barclay
Werauhia ('we-rau-he-a') is a member of the Tillandsioideae subfamily and
is a relatively new genus, created in 1995 by American botanist Jason Grant.
It is named in honour of German botanist Werner Rauh (1913-2000), who
described a number of the Werauhia and Tillandsia species and over many
years, extensively explored the countries and habitats where they grow.

Based on molecular and morphological features and colours of the flowers,
a number of species previously classified within other bromeliad genera,
especially the Thecophylloid group of Vriesea and also Tillandsia, have now

been placed in Werauhia.

There are currently 92 recognised
werauhia species, many are
newly described. They all come
from Central American, northern
South American and Caribbean Island
nations, with the centre being in Costa
Rica and Panama. In their natural
habitat, they are mainly epiphytic and
grow from warm sea level regions, to
higher, cooler elevations around 3,000
metres. They generally have large,
elliptical shaped flowers similar to
Vriesea, but are dull or pale coloured
and mainly open at night, where they
are pollinated by bats and moths.

Originating from this equatorial
region, unfortunately most species
are not used to colder temperatures,

so are quite sensitive and difficult to

grow well in subtropical and cooler

places, such as New Zealand. This is

unfortunate for us, as some species
are breathtakingly beautiful plants,
that easily rival foliage vriesea and
alcantarea for size, form and beauty.

Like the Vriesea and Tillandsia
genera, Werauhia also range greatly
in size from giants up to 2 metres

diameter with towering inflorescences,

such as Werauhia kupperiana and
sanguinolenta, down to very small,
compact species such as Werauhia
insignis, and marnier-lapostollei. Of
the 92 species, only two are found
here, albeit in only a few collections,
where they are grown under cover
for protection from our cool winters.

Werauhia sanguinolenta – A large
plant to around 1.5 metres diameter
with 10-15cm wide all green leaves

and a few-branched vriesea-like flower

spike. The green form is not known to

be in New Zealand, but the dark form,
unofficially known as sanguinolenta
(rubra) is here in small numbers

after being successfully grown from
seed. This plant has highly glossy,
lustrous leaves that can appear a deep
mahogany brown-black all over when
grown in the right environment and

Werauhia leucophylla Werauhia kupperiana

PHOTO: PETER TRISTRAM PHOTO: GRAEME BARCLAY

kept warm. An outstanding variegated
form of sanguinolenta also exists in
Hawaii, registered as Werauhia 'Edna

Shiigi'. It arose as a variegated plant

amongst 1500 normal seedlings at

David Shiigi's Hawaiian nursery

in the 1990s and matured into one

of the largest and most magnificent

variegated bromeliads known with a
wide, white and bright cerise stripe
down the centre of the olive green
leaves.

A problematic trait of Werauhia
sanguinolenta is it's propensity to

only produce a single, difficult to
remove pup near the flower spike

before dying. Hence, propagation of

Werauhia 'Edna Shiigi' has become a

near impossible task, only two plants

currently exist after 25 odd years!
However, I see a "one-in-a-million"

chance appears to have occurred a

few years ago in Indonesia, with

an identical variegated plant also

emerging from a seed batch there...
what a shame it didn't happen here!

Werauhia kupperiana – Another giant
of the genus up to 2 metres diameter with
around 12-15cm wide, heavily mottled,
green leaves. The lime and dark green
tones and leaf patterns possessed by
this species is uniquely beautiful and
make it highly desirable as a landscape
specimen for warm, tropical gardens.

The inflorescence is huge and multi

branched, similar to some alcantarea,
reaching up to 2 metres high. Like
Werauhia sanguinolenta, it was also

grown from seed in New Zealand

a few years ago, but suffers badly
from the colder winter temperatures
and low humidity, hence very few
surviving specimens now exist here.

A third smaller, tillandsia-like species
Werauhia leucophylla with green,
pointed leaves and a long, pendulous,

red and yellow inflorescence, is also

thought to have been imported some
years ago. However, it is not known
if it survived and is still around – if
anyone knows, or has it, please do let

us know!

More photos on P24 23

Werauhia 'Edna Shiigi'
PHOTO: ROYANNE SHIIGI
Werauhia sanguinolenta (rubra)
PHOTO: TASH ATkINSON
More Werauhia
photos...
Werauhia kupperiana
PHOTO: GRAEME BARCLAY

 

May 2015VOL 55 NO 5
• Learning about the genera: Orthophytum
• ‘Bromsmatta’ conference report • Eden Garden revisited
Nidularium procerum (Leme 550). Photo: Peter Waters

Bromeliad Society April Meeting News

– Notes by Bev Ching. Photos by Dave Anderson.
The April meeting opened with the the species Hohenbergia edmundoi,
Special General Meeting of the with the owner wanting to know when
Society that was called to present to pollinate the flowers, however the
the annual financial statement. plant was not yet ready for pollination.

This plant is quite stunning with a tall
The general monthly meeting followed bulbous look, and silvery grey foliage.
the Special General Meeting. This Next was an Aechmea ‘Blue Ice’. A
started with ‘Show and Tell’. First was green leaf stoloniferous plant, but when

Photos from April meeting…

Billbergia ‘Strawberry’ x
‘Domingos Martins’
– Peter Waters. First in
open foliage section
Nidularium atalaiaense –
Dave Anderson. First in
monthly choice section
Vriesea ‘Hill #96’ –
Peter Coyle. First inopen flowering section
Neoregelia ‘Pink Spider’ – John Mitchell.
First in neoregelia section
Tillandsia violacea – Dave Anderson.
First in tillandsia section and ‘Plant of
the Month’

the pups come up they are very frilly

and crisp around the edges. It had blue
petals, almost a cone like shape. Once
fully grown the frilliness disappears.
Next up was a Tillandsia erici . This
species comes from Bolivia and had a

beautiful orange flower. Also a Vriesea

‘Golden Legend’ which had a strange
leaf formation, it looked like two plants
in the middle with the leaves formed

together. Other members had struck this
with other plants. Next was Aechmea
andersonii, this species comes from

Bahia, Brazil. This was named after John
Anderson. Lastly looking for a name was
Alcantarea imperialis (rubra), with its
typical Alcantarea imperialis leaves.
Graeme Barclay then showed photos
from the ‘Bromsmatta’ conference held

two weeks ago. Graeme also went north

with Peter Tristram visiting gardens
along the way until they reached Peter’s

place. One thing that stood out from the

photos was how large Australia can grow
these plants, some up to two metres wide

and at least a metre tall.
The special raffle went to Tonia Adams.
The door prizes to Lester Ching, Judy
Graham and Genneth Marshall-Inman.


COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First was Peter Coyle
with a Herb Hill hybrid from Florida
called Vriesea ‘Hill #96’. Second
was Graeme Barclay with Vriesea
botafogensis, very similar colouring
to Vriesea saundersii with a yellow
spike. Also on the table was Guzmania
wittmackii, always popular and
Neoregelia ‘Chili Verde’.

Open Foliage: Peter Waters with

Billbergia ‘Strawberry’ x ‘Domingos
Martins’, a deep strawberry spotted
plant was first. Second was Billbergia
‘Kawana Moon Drops’ a large green
spotted billbergia. Also on the table were

Aechmea nudicaulis var capitata, a deep
maroon plant, grown in high light and
grows well in Auckland, Vriesea ‘Jungle
Jade’ hybrid, Billbergia ‘Strawberry’,
Neoregelia ‘Catlinite’, Vriesea ospinae
gruberi x ‘Tiger Tim’, Vriesea ospinae
gruberi, Vriesea ospinae gruberi

‘Angela’.
Tillandsia: First was Dave Anderson’s


Tillandsia violacea a large species plant

with a hanging flower spike. Second was

Lynette Nash with Tillandsia ‘Luscious

Lissa’ with five plants mounted on
driftwood.
Neoregelia: First was John Mitchell

with the cultivar Neoregelia ‘Pink

Spider’. The plant was well grown and
vibrant pink colour. This is a pendula
type plant. It is a cross between pendula
and eleutheropetala. Second was Peter
Coyle with Neoregelia ‘Alcatraz’. In the
competition was Neoregelia ‘Jewellery
Shop’, Neoregelia ampullacea x
lilliputiana, Neoregelia ‘Highlander’,
Neoregelia ‘Lamberts Pride’, Neoregelia
‘Rio Ochre’, Neoregelia ‘Canefire’,
Neoregelia ‘Wee Willy’ x (‘Tiger Cub’
x ‘Black Knight’) and Neoregelia
ampullacea x carolinae tricolor.
Monthly Choice – Nidularium: first
was Dave Anderson with Nidularium
atalaiaense from Brazil where is grows

on the beach in the sand. Grows well
here and needs high light to bring the
deep colour out, green petals. Second
was David Goss with Nidularium
innocentii var paxianum, a green plant

with red cup of white flowers. Also

in the competition were Nidularium
regelioides, Nidularium rutilans and two
more Nidularium atalaiaense.
The Plant of the Month went to Dave
Anderson with Tillandsia violacea.
Congratulations to all the winners.


NEXT MEETING: Tues 26th May.


Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – May 2015 issue


CONTENTS
Bromeliad Society April meeting news – Bev Ching 2
President’s Page – Graeme Barclay 5
‘Special Species Spotlight’ – Graeme Barclay 6
‘Bromsmatta’ conference report – Graeme Barclay 8
BSNZ rare plant online auction – Graeme Barclay 10
A winter cover-up – Ann Boon 11
Learning about the genera: Orthophytum – Peter Waters 13
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 16
Group News 17
Eden Garden on the first day of May – Murray Mathieson 19

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 17 for details of group meeting

times and venues.

MAY
24th Northland Group meeting
26th Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and

Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The

Monthly Choice competition: Bigeneric

plants. There will be a discussion

on our new online auction system

and procedures. There will also be a

PowerPoint of Elton Leme’s presentation
at the ‘Cool Broms’ Australasian

bromeliad conference.

JUNE

7th South Auckland group meeting
10th Bay of Plenty group meeting
14th Tillandsia group meeting
14th – 21st BSNZ online auction. See
page 10 of this Journal for full details.

23rd Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and

Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The

Monthly Choice competition: Neoregelia
lilliputiana and hybrids. This meeting
will also be followed by our mid-winter
supper. Please bring a plate!

FRONT COVER:

From Peter Waters. This is the post-anthesis (after flowering) inflorescence of
Nidularium procerum (Leme 550). The primary bracts were a bright red several
months ago and have now turned purple, thus helping to prove that Neoregelia
‘Litmus’ was correctly identified as a procerum and not antoineanum, as it was
originally thought. This procerum is quite large, the plant itself over 1.2 metres wide
and the inflorescence 300mm. wide.


PRESIDENT’S PAGE

Hi everyone. We are fresh
back from the ‘Bromsmatta’
bromeliad conference that was
recently held in Parramatta, Sydney.
As you will see from our feature in this
Journal, it was another good conference
and a great chance to catch up with
numerous friends from Australia and
the USA. It was especially nice to also
still hear a number of complimentary
comments about how great our 2013
‘Cool Broms’ conference was. We also
had a number of Australian bromeliad
folks join the BSNZ, simply because
they have heard or seen from friends
how good our Kiwi Journal is – such
positive things are nice to see!

On behalf of the BSNZ,

congratulations and welcome to all the

new committees and officers elected

in and around our various regional

bromeliad groups. We hope your
memberships stay healthy and your
groups continue to bring enjoyment
to everyone involved in them. Please

do ensure you have your group’s news

regularly sent in by the first Tuesday

of each month to our editor Murray,
so he can include it in the monthly

Journal and keep everyone up to date.

Once again, on behalf of our editorial

committee, we would also love to
receive more articles and photos

from any of the regional groups to

include in the Journal. Maybe an

easy idea is simply to email in a few
garden or collection photos and a
short paragraph or two on a special

member where you hold your monthly
meetings? It’s always nice to feature
different gardens, members and

collections for others to see how you

are growing things. Remember, you
are all very welcome to contribute,

so please give it some thought and

start the articles flowing through.

I would like to offer special thanks to
David Anderson for his many years of
duty as secretary of the BSNZ. Dave
has stepped down this year but will

still remain on the committee to help
out and assist our new secretary, Bev

Ching, as required. We are very lucky
to have dedicated members such as
Dave and Bev to help keep the society
running in a positive way.

Finally, I look forward to seeing
plenty of members participating in
our inaugural BSNZ ‘Online Rare
Plant Auction’ in June. Please check

out the ‘auction page’ in this issue
for all the details and don’t forget to
mark the dates on your calendars

and diaries – go and do it now!

Cheers, Graeme Barclay

A NEW BRAZILIAN WEBSITE…

Oscar Ribeira, proprietor of Bromeliário Imperialis, has a new website with a
treasure trove of habitat and species information and photographs of bromeliads
in different regions of Brazil. Well worth checking it out at:

http://imperialis.com.br.


This month we look at a beautiful small species discovered in Brazil only twelve
years ago that has an interesting Kiwi connection.

Canistrum ‘Vania Leme’

Our Scientific Officer and

Treasurer, Peter Waters, is

responsible for registering this

outstanding species cultivar and was

part of the original collection party.
Here is what Peter wrote about it in the
2008 BSI Journal Vol 58(2), page 73…

A bromeliad species rare in cultivation
is Canistrum auratum Leme. In Elton
Leme’s 1997 book ‘Canistrum -
Bromeliads of the Atlantic Forest’ it says
about this plant, which was previously
subject to only two collections’……..
‘At today’s deforestation rates, it has

become increasingly difficult, or even
impossible, to find this species again in

the wild. There are very few specimens
of C. auratum in cultivation. All arose
from the original clone, which does not
guarantee the survival of this species
ex situ.’

On an expedition to Bahia, Brazil
in September 2003, our team, which
consisted of Elton Leme, Raymundo
Reis, Jose Falcon, Carlos Moreira,
Edmundo Silva, Marlon Machado and
Peter and Jeanette Waters, discovered a
new population of Canistrum auratum
in the county of Barra do Choca near
the city of Vitoria da Conquista and
the same day, a few kilometres away,

in a small fragment of Atlantic Forest
at about 600m elevation made an even

more dramatic find of a new cultivar of

the same species.This new and striking
plant has wonderfully marked and
banded foliage in shades of purple and
dark-brown in addition to its attractive

orange and yellow inflorescence, and

is sure to be highly sought after in the
horticultural world.

Because leaf colour is not recognized

as sufficient reason for varietal status,

it is intended to assign a cultivar name
to this new introduction, and it gives
me great pleasure to name it Canistrum
‘Vania Leme’ after the beautiful wife of
our friend, Elton Leme, the foremost
authority on Brazilian bromeliads.
Vania fully deserves the recognition for
many years of support of her husband’s
work.

That says it all and gives you a clear

idea on the diversity of bromeliad

genera and how many different

plants are likely being lost to

deforestation in South American
countries – many unfortunately

before they are even discovered.

This lovely cultivar is quite compact
at around 25cm high and 20cm wide


when fully grown. It is now becoming
well established in New Zealand
collections and is proving to be an
excellent, vigorous grower. It likes

warm growing conditions, protection

from winter cold and needs bright light

all year round to attain and maintain

the dark brown tones to the leaves

and an optimal bottle-shaped form.

With these conditions, if placed in a

reasonably large pot with adequate

fertiliser in the warmer growing
seasons, it will readily put out new
pups on woody stolons and form a

beautiful clump within only two to
three years.

Canistrum ‘Vania Leme’
PHotoS: G. BArCLAy

‘Bromsmatta' photos…
Neoregelia ‘Larnach’s Enchantment’. Tillandsia ‘Silver Queen’.
First neoregelia. PHoto: GrAEME BArCLAy Show champion. PHoto: PEtEr CoyLE


Hohenbergia rosea in bloom at
Sydney royal Botanical Gardens.
PHoto: GrAEME BArCLAy
Deuterocohnia brevifolia. Best species.

PHoto: GrAEME BArCLAy


Plant sales WoW! PHoto: MEryL tHoMAS Main display. PHoto: MEryL tHoMAS


‘Bromsmatta’…
bromeliad conference report


– Graeme Barclay
The Bromeliad Society of Australia
hosted the ‘Bromsmatta’ 18th
Australasian bromeliad conference
in the Novotel Hotel in Parramatta, Sydney
from April 16th to 19th . There were around
140 registrants from as far afield as Florida
and Perth, as well as 17 Kiwis in total.

The conference started in a similar format
to ‘Cool Broms 2013’ with a popular ‘10

10-10 Raffle’ on Thursday afternoon,

to allow 10 lucky winners access to the

plant sales room for 10 minutes before
everyone else to select up to 10 plants.

Plant sales continued at various time over

the next 3 days… by all accounts probably

the most successful sale in conference

history. The conference competitive

show, while quite small in size, featured

some lovely specimens, a number quite

different and larger in size to what we are

used to seeing at our own ‘Fiesta’ show.

On Friday morning the guest speaker
presentations began with 12 excellent
talks being delivered by Sunday
lunchtime. Andy Siekkinen from San
Diego gave two slide-show talks on
Hechtia and Tillandsia in Mexico; Dennis
Cathcart from Tropiflora Florida also
gave slide-shows about his recent habitat
trips to Brazil. There were interesting
and informative presentations by Doug
Cross on Cryptanthus; Laurie Dorfer
on bromeliad fungal diseases; Dr.Teresa
Bert on growing uncommon bromeliad
genera; Bruce Dunstan on Guzmania and
Pitcairnia in Colombian habitats; Pamela
Koide-Hyatt on Tillandsia hybrids; Nigel
Thomson on hybridising theories; and
Peter Tristram on the ‘Wow Factor’ of
collecting special bromeliads.

With no scheduled garden visits, on the
Saturday, after morning tea, around 70
registrants took an optional coach tour
into the city centre to visit the Sydney
Royal Botanical Gardens (next to the

Opera House), followed by a pleasant
and relaxing 3 hour harbour cruise. The

gardens have many different plantings

with some interesting bromeliad areas

– especially for a Kiwi! There were
large clumps of flowering Hohenbergia
rosea and H. correia-araujoi, as well
as Aechmea ramosa, Ae. blanchetiana,
Ae. aquilega and Neoregelia cruenta
‘Goldilocks’ – all lovely large plants not
often seen in bloom in New Zealand.
The harbour cruise took us back up the

Parramatta River, where our coaches

collected us from the wharf.

The conference banquet and auction
was on Sunday evening, with a number
of bromeliad books and memorabilia

up for auction and fetching healthy

prices. Earlier, at the conference

meeting, it was resolved to form a new
‘Australasian Bromeliad Council’, with
initial representation from all Australian
States and New Zealand, to oversee
conference matters and facilitate societies

working closer together. The Gold Coast

Bromeliad Society was announced as

the host for the 2019 conference. This

will follow the ‘Sunny Broms’ 2017

conference being hosted in late March that
year by The Sunshine Coast Bromeliad
Society in Caloundra. These conferences
are sure to be fabulous events and are
both ideal locations to have a holiday, so,

start planning to attend now with the kiwi

contingent!


BSNZ Rare Plant Online Auction…
On June 14th to 21st!


– Graeme Barclay
As mentioned in the Journal last

month, the BSNZ in running

a new ‘Rare Plant Online
Auction’ for all BSNZ members to
participate in. This initiative has
been implemented to provide more
members easy access to buying and
selling a wider range of quality, rare
bromeliads. We also hope it will
boost nationwide interaction and
camaraderie amongst members and
increase usage of the BSNZ website.

The first auction will be run over

a week-long period, starting from
7:00pm Sunday 14th June until finishing
the evening of Sunday 21st June. Here
are the key things you need to know to

get started.

HOw TO SUBMIT PLANTS TO
SELL IN THE AUCTION…

1. Any BSNZ member from any
location in New Zealand can submit
a plant to auction (maximum 3).
If you wish to do so, please email
Graeme at gray.barclay@xtra.
co.nz with the following pieces of
information included for each plant;
a) Put the correct name (or hybrid
formula) of your plant in the email
subject line. (Make a separate email

for each plant submitted please).

b) Attach at least one colour photo

(up to 3 are allowed) clearly showing

your plant’s features and advise
approximate size (diameter x height in

cm). Also whether it is a bare-root pup,
seedling, potted mature etc.

c) Advise any history / selling points
/ provenance / rarity notes / special

growing conditions it requires – i.e:

text you would like listed on the

auction page to help enthuse buyers.

d) Advise your reserve price

(minimum bid) that you would
like listed on the auction.

e) Advise your name and location

(town or city). Your name WILL NOT
be listed on the auction, but your
location WILL be.

2. Auction plant submissions must
be emailed any time from Friday
May 22nd to 7:00pm Friday June
11th to be eligible for inclusion. You
will then be emailed to confirm if
your plant is accepted for the auction.
Your plant will be listed by the auction
admin team, so you do not have to
do anything else at this point other

than watch the fun unfold online.

3. Bromeliads ONLY will be accepted
for auction and must be generally
considered rare, special or highly


desirable in some way to most other
members. Common / low value
plants will not be accepted. All
plants must be healthy and clean.

4. Please read the auction procedures
and rules posted on the BSNZ
website for further information re
payments, commission, delivery,
shipping etc for sellers and buyers.
(See below under ‘How to Bid’ where
to look on the website).

HOw TO BId ON PLANTS IN
THE AUCTION…

Simply login to the website with your
username and password at www.
bsnz.org and click on the ‘BSNZ
Rare Plant Auction’ tab in the menu
when it appears. There you will find

a linked page with full instructions

on bidding, payment, receiving plants

and the rules of the auction. Please

familiarise yourself with these then

you are free to bid during the auction
period. Any financial BSNZ member
with a login can bid on any plant listed
at any time before the auction ends.

If you do not have a login, or have

forgotten what it is, all you need

to do is email David Cowie (our
webmaster) at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

and he can set you up immediately

with a username and password.

We look forward to plenty of members
participating in both buying and
selling to support the society. If it goes

well, we will look to schedule future

auctions under the same format. So
don’t be shy, spread the word, join

in the fun and let’s make it a success
for all ….and please mark yourcalendars and diaries NOw so you
don’t forget!

A winter cover-up

– Ann Boon. Reprinted from Bromeliad Society of N.S.W,
Bromeliad Newsletter, July 1991.
As soon as the nights start to get
cooler it is time to make sure
your plants are comfortably
‘bedded down’ for the winter.

First, clean any foreign matter out
of the cups. I use a small paint brush
which I find ideal, but buy a new one
and use it for no other purpose. Gently
turn the brush around in the cup. If you
spread the fingers of both hands out and
over the top of the pot, you will find

that you will be able to form a ‘web’

over the soil and at the same time get a
grasp of the pot and use the tips of the

fingers to support the plant at the base.
In this way, when tipping the pot on its

side to empty the water out of the cup,
the soil loss is cut down to a minimum

and the plant is not disturbed.

Next, cut away any dead or yellowing

leaves by cutting the leaf down the
centre from tip to base. Now hold the

Cont’d P12 11


plant firmly in one hand and gently

tear the leaf, one half at a time, away
from the plant, working from the cut

at the centre to the outside. If you have

to trim any leaves always re-shape the

tips the same as the leaf grows. If the
plants have been outside during the

summer months, clean out any dead
leaves or grass which may have lodged

in amongst the leaves. Pull out any
weeds growing in the pots. This does

not include those lovely little ferns that

decide to come and ‘board with the
broms’ from time to time.

If any plants need propping up they can
be tied to a small stake, but sometimes
I find it difficult to tie it firmly without
altering the contour of the leaves.
Lucky stones can be used but there is
the danger of an offset being damaged
should it come up underneath before
the stone is removed. A wire support
can also be made from a coat hanger.

No hard and fast rules can be set down

for watering during the cold weather

but it is important to remember

that more plants are lost due to

OVERWATERING.

The needs of plants vary considerably,

to the size and type of pot (plants in
terracotta need more watering than

those in plastic), the soil, whether

it holds the water or is porous, the
environment in which the plant is
growing and the special needs of the

plant itself (does it grow in habitats
where it is wet or dry, rainfall, etc.?). If
in doubt keep the soil only SLIGHTLY
MOIST AND THE LEAVES DRY
during extreme cold spells. Use a
paddle pop stick to test the soil.

If possible, turn the bulbous tillandsias
planted on bark in an upside-down

position so that the plant will not

become waterlogged during any wet
weather Water other tillandsias VERY,
VERY SPARINGLY. Water the SOIL
ONLY of cryptanthus, keeping the
leaves dry. The hardier bromeliads
may be given a very light spray from
the hose to freshen the foliage but pick

a warm day and do it early so that

they have dried off before the night air
begins to settle.

If, through lack of space, some plants
have to be left out in the open, try to

arrange them in the most protected

spot but not pushed into a damp corner
which gets no sun. Make a portable

fence with wire netting and a few
stakes threaded through at regular

intervals. This can be put around the
plants and fastened together with a tie.

Make a tent using hessian or an old

sheet (not plastic) and tie to the wire.

This makes a good cover especially if

frosts are expected.

This programme may be too time-
consuming for members with extensive
collections but I have written it as a
guide for new members with small
collections.

Finally, it is a good idea to keep notes

on the things you do during the year,

so that you can compare and possibly

change or improve your programme

next year. Don’t rely on your memory.
Just when you need it most it has a
nasty habit of letting you down!


Learning about the genera : Orthophytum
– Peter Waters
Orthophytum is an endemic
species of Brazil living in
rocky habitats in Espirito
Santo. Minas Gerais and Bahia states
predominantly with a few north of
there. They are exclusively terrestrial
and saxicolous on rocky escarpments
in the region of the Atlantic Forest.

In 1979 there were only 17 species of
Orthophytum, in 2004, 34 species, but
by 2014 this number had swelled to 67.

In 2004 Elton Leme sorted them
into subcomplexes, amoenum with a
sessile or scapeless (no flower stalk)

Cont’d P15

Orthophytum burle-marxii
PHoto: PEtEr WAtErS
Orthophytum navioides
PHoto: PAiroJ SuttHiSErEPonG
Orthophytum vagans
PHoto: GrAEME BArCLAy
Orthophytum saxicola
PHoto: toDD CLAyton
More photos on P14

Orthophytum photos…

Orthophytum sucrei

PHoto: AnDrEW DEVonSHirE

Orthophytum gurkenii

PHoto: rAnEy LiEn


Orthophytum disjunctum

PHoto: AnDrEW DEVonSHirE

Orthophytum foliosum

PHoto: DEnniS CAtHCArt


Orthophytum maracasense Orthophytum lemei

PHoto: DErEk ButCHEr PHoto: DEnniS HECkArt

14


Cont’d from P13 – Learning about the genera: Orthophytum

inflorescence, including navioides and
burle-marxii; and subcomplex vagans
also with a sessile inflorescence, but
with a caulescent or long stem.

The other subcomplexes have an
inflorescence on a scape; subcomplexes

disjunctum and mello-barretoi have a

distinct rosette but differ in some flower
details, and subcomplex leprosum has
no rosette but the leaves just grow as
scape bracts.

Subcomplex disjunctum is the largest
group with over 30 species and
includes saxicola, magalhaesii and
sucrei.

Many Orthophytum are rather small,

one or two very small, but there are

large ones as Orthophytum horridum

can be 1.4 meters high when flowering
Because of their natural habitat they

prefer warmer conditions, and can

suffer during winter. They are found in

the same general area as Hohenbergia

so need some protection from frosts.
They can tolerate very bright light to
full sun but can look better if given
a little shade. While they grow in

extremely harsh conditions in nature
and can survive much neglect they
will appreciate good watering and high
levels of fertiliser to make them grow

fast and produce more offsets. They

are very like Cryptanthus in many
respects and the formation of offsets is

similar. If taken off too early they are

quite reticent in rooting and grow very

slowly.

There are not many Orthophytum spp.
In New Zealand but you may come

across the following:

Orthophytum burle-marxii and
navioides have the distinctive flat
appearance when flowering and their
leaves turn brilliant shades of red,
Orthophytum navioides has very fine
leaves which are somewhat fragile. It
is a parent of the hybrids ‘Blaze’ and
‘Copper Penny’ which are reasonably
common.

Orthophytum vagans grows up a stem

and becomes suffused with red as it
nears flowering. It is the other parent

of ‘Copper Penny’ and also has an

attractive variegated form.

Orthophytum saxicola is a small
growing spiny plant that pups readily
on stolons and makes a clump very

quickly.

Orthophytum gurkenii is one of the

most common species with its zebra
banding on the succulent leaves and its
elevated inflorescence. Offsets grow
on the spike after flowering. A cultivar

with silvery leaves in Orthophytum

‘Warren Loose’.

Orthophytum sucrei has long stolons
and is also one of the smaller species,

but makes a great show if given good
light.

Orthophytum disjunctum has silver-
grey rigid leaves and can grow up to

400mm when flowering.

Other species which have been
seen here but are much harder to
come by are foliosum, fosterianum,
lemei, macroflorum, magalhaesii,
maracasense and toscanoi.


OFFICERS


Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Secretary: Bev Ching 09-576 4595
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters


Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451

David Cowie 09-630 8220

Chris Paterson 09-625 6707

Diane Timmins 09-415 9066

Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONdENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson

Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee

or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month

display Advertising

Rates are:

Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

‘Buy & Swap’

Listings in ‘Buy & Swap’ are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
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Group News

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Nancy Peters
Our April meeting was held at Diana

Holt’s garden, 339 Mangawhai Road,

Mangawhai. President Sandra Wheeler
welcomed 27 members and thanked
Diana for having our group to her
home. Diana said we were the first
group to visit her since she bought the

one acre property three years ago and

she has been transforming it from a
very run down area (with 1935 house)

since she ran out of room to store her

bromeliad and clivia collections at her
Auckland property. Diana said she
has been a member of the Bromeliad

Society for 20 years and her interest

began as an eight year old helping her

grandmother and growing her own

succulents.

April ‘Show & Tell’ Competition:

1st Maureen Green – Neoregelia
‘Empress’; 2nd equal Don Nicholson

– Tillandsia rotundata and Sandra
Wheeler – Vriesea ‘Jewel’.
Congratulations to the winners.
Raffles were drawn and the meeting
closed at 2.30pm. We then toured
Diana’s garden, shade houses and

extensive plant collections and
admired the new plantings of trees and

shrubs and garden beds. We also had
the opportunity to buy bromeliads and
clivias etc. before afternoon tea.

Next Meeting: Sunday 24th May at

1.30pm at Robyn Thomas’s garden,
52 West View Crescent, Onerahi.

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad
and Orchid Group

– Alison Iremonger
Ross Fergusson welcomed members

and visitors to our April meeting

hosted by Ken and Sue Laurent. Their

garden always looks amazing and is

the kind of garden most bromeliad and

orchid enthusiasts would dearly love

to own. Robert Flanagan was the guest

speaker and he spoke on his interest in

tillandsias. The competition for the day

was tillandsias and there were an array

of plants on display. A highlight of
Robert and Margaret Flanagan’s stay

with Ken and Sue was the releasing

of a baby kiwi chick named ‘Anzac’.

Wilma gave a short report on the

recent Te Puke Orchid Show. Members
are getting behind the ‘donated’ plants
ideas where the plants are being readied
for an upcoming craft market stall. Our
meeting in July will be a workshop
meeting. Ross asked for ideas from
members to incorporate into this day.
Our September meeting will be a
bus trip to Tauranga, visiting gardens
and nurseries. A long-term plan is
to see how many members would be

interested in going to Australia to

attend a conference. Afternoon tea was
served and some members took the

opportunity to have a look around the
garden, and vote for the tillandsia they

liked the most.

Competition:

1st R. Fergusson – Tillandsia
streptophylla; 2nd A. Iremonger
Tillandsia bergeri; 3rd G. Fergusson
Tillandsia butzii. Sue, Wilma, Pam,

Cont’d P18 17


Cont’d from P17– Group News

Stewart, Jo and Ross all had something

to add to the ‘Show and Tell” part of

the meeting. Raffles were drawn.
Members bought plants from the sales
table and also took plants from the
‘free’ section.

Next Meeting: 17th May. Visitors
are always welcome. Contacts: Ross
Fergusson 07-312 5487; Maureen

Moffatt 07-322 2276; Sue Laurent 07

307 1323.

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Lynley Breeze
This meeting followed a different
format and instead of having a speaker

we had a fun auction. Alec Roy, our

entertaining auctioneer did a wonderful

job, assisted by Roger Allen. Lynley

Roy arranged the auction cards and

number allocation and noted down
the buyers. There were some great

donations; pickles, jams and fruit

produce were especially popular. Many
good bromeliads changed hands. The
club raised over $500.00 which we
will put towards a donation of $250 to
both the local hospice and the St John’s
ambulance service. It was a lot of fun,
with many bargains and we would
recommend this for other groups. We

did not have the usual ‘Plant of the

Month’ or competitions.

Next Meeting: Wednesday 10th

June. Barry Curtis will speak about
growing orchids. Plants of the month
will be Nidularium and Canistropsis.
There will be a committee meeting at
11.30am.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marie Healey
We held our Annual General Meeting,
Sunday May 3rd at the Auckland

Botanical Gardens. It was a lovely

sunny day and car parks were very hard

to find. Marie Healey was re-elected as
President for another year. Members
had been asked to bring along their
favourite bromeliads and give a brief
talk about the growing conditions
they have them in. There were some
amazing plants. Raffles were won by
Delma Pell, Nancy Murphy and Brian
Sherson.

Next Meeting: June 7th, at the
Auckland Botanic Gardens. Our guest
speaker will be Andrew Maloy, with
his subject being vrieseas.

Tillandsia Group – Nancy Murphy

The April meeting of the group was
held at Larry and Nancy Murphy’s

garden. It was noted that a few hardy
tillandsias have been applied to drift
word sculptures in the garden but the
bulk of the collection is in the original
plastic house. Several plants where
brought along for discussion and

Lynette Nash’s artistically arranged
Tillandsia funckiana (refer photo in

April Journal on page 6) was now in
flower and each wee plant held aloft
a red-orange flower. The horizontal
staging obviously contributed to the
grand display. It was resolved to
continue bi-monthly meetings.
Next Meeting: June 14th at Lynette
Nash’s garden at 11 Westbury Crescent.
Remuera, at 1.00pm. New members
are always welcome.


Eden Garden on the first day of May…

– Notes and photos by Murray Mathieson
It was lovely late Autumn morning
when we visited the ‘Bromeliad
Glade’ at the beautiful Eden
Garden, in the heart of Auckland, to
catch up on all the great work that is
being done by our dedicated group of
ladies from the Bromeliad Society.

Isla McGowan, Lynette Nash, Diane
Timmins, Joan Anderson and Margaret

Bramley meet at the ‘Glade’ on the

first Friday morning of every month
and their combined ‘TLC’ is really
making a difference. Visitors are now
treated to tidy paths and beds and
many attractive new plantings. Some

of the planting and tidying up work
they are performing around and up the

steep rocky outcrops is definitely not
for the faint hearted!

On the May morning we visited, the

‘team’ were concentrating on thinning
out and removing large clumps of

Ochagavia litoralis that had been

threatening to take over a couple of the

main planting beds. The remedial work

has immediately made more planting

space available.

The ‘Bromeliad Glade’, and Eden
Garden, is well worth a visit and as

a bonus the garden café serves great
coffee and delicious food. If you’d like

to help out and join our team of society

volunteers please ring Isla McGowan,
Tel: 524 8733. Eden Garden is at 24
Omana Ave. Epsom www.edengarden.
co.nz


the entrance to the ‘Glade’.


Women at work.

More photos on P20 19


Eden Garden…


the morning light is
attractive in the ‘Glade’.
Margaret Bramleycontemplates her next move.
Diane timmins, isla McGowan, Margaret
Bramley and Joan Anderson.

Lynette nash establishes
some new plantings.


isla McGowan. in the thick of it.

 April 2015VOL 55 NO 4
• More superb 'Fiesta' photos
• Learning about the genera: Quesnelia
Coming soon... our rare plant online auction
Tillandsia muhriae x xiphioides.
Photo by Peter Waters

Bromeliad Society March
Meeting News – Notes and photos by Dave Anderson

The March meeting opened with before taking nominations for the
the AGM. President Graeme executive and committee – see the new
Barclay read his annual report list of Society 'Officers' in this Journal.

Photos from March meeting...

2
BY DAVE ANDERSON
Aechmea zebrina – Peter Coyle.
'Plant of the Month'
Neoregelia'Delirious'
Aechmea
'Friederike'
Guzmania
variegata
Hohenbergiaedmundoi
Tillandsia multicaulis

The general monthly meeting followed
the AGM. The trophy winners from the
annual competition at the 'Fiesta' were
then presented.

The monthly meeting started with the
'Show and Tell'. First up and wanting a
name was Tillandsia hondurensis with its
showy succulent rosette. Next and also
wanting a name was a guzmania hybrid
that was probably Guzmania 'Soledo'

with its distinctive inflorescence. Lastly

for display was the most attractive
Hohenbergia castellanosii, a beautiful
plant that is endemic to the hot sandy
coastline of Bahia in northeast Brazil.
Unfortunately here in Auckland this
latter plant requires heated hothouse
conditions to have it looking well
through the winter months.

David Anderson then gave a talk on

Guzmania.

The special raffle prize went to Garth

Houltham and Graeme Barclay.
The door prizes going to Genneth
Marshall-Inman, Andrew Maloy and Jill
Porter.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First was Bev Ching
with Aechmea 'Friederike' – a plant
which is identical in all respects to
'Fascini' except for having completely
smooth spineless leaf edges. Second was
David Goss with Nidularium innocentii
var paxianum – a green plant with a

beautiful red cup of white flowers. In

the competition were Aechmea 'Pink
Rocket', nudicaulis var aequalis,
'Sangria'; Vriesea ospinae var gruberi,
'Poelmanii' F2, 'Komet' and 'Sunset'.
Open Foliage: First was Peter Coyle
with Aechmea zebrina – a most

attractive plant that also won Plant of
the Month. John Mitchell was second
with Hohenbergia edmundoi. In the
competition were Aechmea orlandiana
x mexicana, nudicaulis var aequalis;
Alcantarea 'Red Ensign' x vinicolor;
Guzmania sanguinea 'Tricolor';
Orthophytum 'Copper Penny'; Vriesea
aff. atra, 'Hot Salsa', 'Star Jewel' and
'White Cloud'.

Tillandsia: Lester Ching's Tillandsia
multicaulis – with its many

inflorescences was first and second was

David Anderson with Tillandsia capitata
'Yellow'. On the table were Tillandsia
crocata, guatemalensis and mallemontii.
Neoregelia: First was Peter Coyle with
Neoregelia 'High Society' – a most
attractive highly coloured plant with
parents (carolinae x concentrica) x
'Ninja'. Graeme Barclay was second
with Neoregelia 'Milagro' with parents
similar to the previous plant namely
[(carolinae x concentrica) x 'Royal
Burgundy'] x 'Royal Burgundy' . In the
competition were Neoregelia 'Africa',
'Avalanche' x 'Apricot Nectar',
ampullacea 'Tigrina' x 'Gold Fever',
'Gold Fever' x ampullacea, 'Carnival',
'Delirious', 'Monarch', species (new),

'Royal Cordovan' and 'Hannibal Lector'

x carcharodon.
Monthly Choice – Guzmania: First was
Peter Waters with Guzmania variegata

– a beautiful species from this genus
of highly coloured plants. Bev Ching
was second with Guzmania squarrosa.
The other plants in the competition
were Guzmania sanguinea, wittmackii,
'Decora' hybrid, 'Salsa' and 'Red Star'.
The Plant of the Month went to Peter
Coyle with Aechmea zebrina.
Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING: Tues 28th April.

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – April 2015 issue

CONTENTS
Bromeliad Society March meeting news – Dave Anderson 2
More beautiful plants from 'Fiesta' 2015 – Andrew Devonshire 5
President's Page – Graeme Barclay 7
Alcantarea propagation by adventitious pups – Bruce Dunstan 8
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 10
Coming soon... our Rare Plant Online Auction – Graeme Barclay 11
Group News 12
Bromeliad oddities – Peter Paroz 14
'Special Species Spotlight' – Graeme Barclay 16
Learning about the genera: Quesnelia – Peter Waters 18

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 12 for details of group meeting

times and venues.

APRIL

26th Northland Group meeting
26th Hawkes Bay Group meeting
28th Society monthly meeting at

Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
The monthly meeting will be preceded
by a short Special General Meeting to
formally present the Society's annual

financial statements. The Monthly
Choice competition: Nidularium. There
will be a PowerPoint presentation on the
'Bromsmatta' Australasian bromeliad
conference.

MAY

3rd South Auckland Group meeting
and AGM

13th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
24th Northland Group meeting
26th Society monthly meeting at

Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden and
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The

Monthly Choice competition: Bigeneric

plants. There will be a discussion
on our new online auction system
and procedures. There will also be a

PowerPoint of Elton Leme's presentation

at the 'Cool Broms' Australasian
bromeliad conference.

FRONT COVER:

Tillandsia muhriae x xiphioides. The plant was made by Mark Dimmitt, curator of

the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum in about 1985. The flower is 25 mm across. Both

parents come from southern South America. Photo by Peter Waters.

More great plants from 'Fiesta' 2015...

PHOTOS BY ANDREW DEVONSHIRE

Last month we featured trophy winners and many class winners from our
February 'Fiesta' Show. Of course, as well as the 'winners', there were
many other superb bromeliads on display. We only have so many colour
pages available each month and so in April we are taking the opportunity to
parade some more highly placed 'Fiesta' beauties. Enjoy!

Aechmea fasciata (variegated). Billbergia 'Hunua Risotto'.
Peter Coyle – second in Class 1. John Mitchell – second in Class 3.

Neoregelia 'Life Force'.
Andrew Devonshire – second in Class 8.
Nidularium atalaiaense.
Graeme Barclay – second in Class 9.
More photos on P6

More 'Fiesta'
photos...

Tillandsia lorentziana.

Dave Dawson – third in Class 14.

Tillandsia tectorum.

Win Shorrock – second in Class 15.

Vriesea 'Dark Knight' x 'Snowman'.
John Mitchell – second in Class 17.

Tillandsia funckiana.
Lynette Nash – second in Class 11.
Vriesea 'Kiwi Green & Gold'.
Andrew Maloy – second in Class 20.

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Annual report to members:

Iam delighted to present my first

annual report as president of the
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

2014-15 has been another successful
year for our society. In the wake
of hosting the 'Cool Broms' 2013
conference, we have continued to run

our meetings and sales efficiently,

retain overall member numbers and

maintain a sound financial position.

We have also had a healthy number
of new members join recently, which
is an encouraging trend that we hope
continues.

I'm sure you will agree, our monthly
Journal is looking better than ever. It
continues to rate as one of the most
impressive and professional monthly
bromeliad journals in the world, which
is something we can all be extremely
proud of as a society. Special thanks
to our editor Murray Mathieson,
editorial committee Dave Anderson
and Peter Waters and to all our regular
contributing writers. Without your
dedication and support, producing
our fantastic Journal would not be
possible. Remember, we are interested
in anything to do with bromeliads, all
contributions from anywhere in the
country, and accounts and photos of
bromeliad trips overseas are more than
welcome. I very much look forward
to more members and regional groups
participating in the future.

In lieu of our absent normal Spring Sale
in 2014, Andrew and Rhonda Maloy
hosted a fabulous day at their 'Kiwi
Bromeliads' nursery in early October.
This event was very well patronised by
members from all over the country –
and also supported by a number of other
society sellers, to create a unique and
memorable occasion. Special thanks
again to Andrew and Rhonda for being
so willing to make this day possible
and provide a win-win outcome for all.

Our annual 'Fiesta' show and sale
was once again a major highlight
of the year and a great showcase for
our society. Congratulations to all the
winners and place-getters of each class

– and to everyone else who entered
plants. While the competition is great,
it's a much greater thrill for me having
such a vibrant and exciting show to
view over the whole weekend – and
enjoying the camaraderie amongst
fellow members. Thank you once
again to all the helpers and sellers that
make our pinnacle weekend possible.
Finally, some further special mentions.

Our society committee has once
again performed their roles extremely
admirably and without a hitch. We
are so lucky to have a core of such
dedicated and experienced people
serving us so well – thank you all
for your time, help and expertise.

Cont'd P8

Cont'd from P7 – President's Page

To Isla McGowan and helpers who
have largely taken it upon themselves
to restore Eden Garden to its former
glory with regular working bees,
well done and thank you for your
efforts. It is great to know this area
is now being cared for and the
garden management and patrons
are delighted with how it looks.

Last but not least, to Judy Graham,
Don Brown and Larry Murphy for

your continued great job in the kitchen
at our monthly meetings, it is very
much appreciated – you do a great job
and the coffee never tasted so good !

To finish, can I say that while it's

sometimes been quite challenging
in terms of allocating my time,
I have greatly enjoyed the role as
your president so far. Special thanks
to secretary Dave Anderson and vice
president Jocelyn Coyle for their
support and assistance in getting me
up-to-speed – and keeping me on track.

I am therefore looking forward to
being your president once again –
and as mentioned in the Journal last
month, I am excited to help bring
you some new initiatives later this
year that I hope you will enjoy.

Cheers,

Graeme Barclay

Alcantarea

– Propagation by adventitious pups
– Bruce Dunstan.
Reprinted from Bromeliad Society of Victoria newsletter, 2011
Ihave been interested in the genus
Alcantarea for a number of years,
having seen them growing in
botanical gardens in Hawaii, Florida
and Costa Rica and I hadn't seen many
grown in Australia. Over the past five
or so years I have found growers who
have limited numbers of a range of
species.

The fact that it takes so long for

alcantareas to flower means that one

of the quickest ways to multiply
these plants is to start growing the

adventitious pups. The first species

I started with was Alcantarea
imperialis. This plant takes between

12-15 years to produce a flower spike.

Needless to say my original plants
I bought 9 years ago, I think, it was so
long ago, at a combined show at Mt

Coot-tha, have still to flower. They

would be easily more than 2 metres

across and are about 1.5 metres in
height.

Alcantarea imperialis tends to produce
a lot of pups when the plants are less
than 200 mm tall. I started by removing
these pups carefully with a sharp knife.
It took quite a while, and also lots of
pups were destroyed by not getting
any of the basal tissue from which
the roots will eventually emerge. As
I have done more pups over time, I
have found that rather than cutting the
pups from the parent plant, it is best to
almost lever them away, by placing the
knife in very close and then twisting.
This prevents the heartbreak when you
don't cut close enough to get any of the
basal tissue of the pup.

When I started, I waited until the
pups were a reasonable size before
harvesting. As I did more and more
I realized that they could be taken at
much smaller sizes. The average size I
generally take them at now is about 50
mm tall. The harvested pups are treated
like seedlings and planted into a peat
and perlite medium, one part peat and
two parts perlite. These go directly into
tubes due to the volume we do them in.

The pups are placed in a shadehouse
that has white shadecloth. This gives
30% shade and the plants are watered
four times a day (in Queensland, Ed.).
The mix is well drained ensuring that
the mix is moist but not waterlogged.
The pups are then liquid fed with a
Seasol mixture on a weekly basis.

The pups quickly begin to show signs
of growth and within 3-4 months are
starting to produce leaves more than a
cm wide. At this stage they need to be
potted on.

Alcantareas are terrestrial bromeliads
and produce extensive root systems.
I have found that if the young plants are
not potted on at this stage they become

very difficult to remove from the tubes

as the roots tend to attach themselves
to the inside of the tubes. We use a
standard composted bark/sand potting
medium for the alcantareas.

We also use high rates of controlled
release fertilizer, as alcantareas are
gross feeders. Potting on into larger
containers, through trial and error,
has taught us to pot the plants high.
This exposes the basal tissue of the
young plant. If the young plants are
very wobbly they can be held in the
correct position by small satay sticks
or something similar.

By planting the plants high it seems
to stimulate more adventitious pup
production. A small plant in a 140
mm pot can, on average, produce 4-6
pups before it gets to 150 mm tall.
Alcantarea imperialis tends to produce
most pups between 100-200 mm
height. In this way pups take less than
a year to produce their own pups, and
in a short space of time numbers can
grow exponentially to the point that
I now have more plants than I think
I can successfully market.

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Secretary: Bev Ching 09-576 4595
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters

Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Lester Ching 09-576 4595

Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451
David Cowie 09-630 8220
Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Diane Timmins 09-415 9066
Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,

Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first

Tuesday of publication month

Display Advertising

Rates are:

Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

'Buy & Swap'

Listings in 'Buy & Swap' are FREE for

members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366

or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

Rare Plant Online Auction... coming soon!

– Graeme Barclay
As I mentioned in our March Journal, the BSNZ committee has been working
on a new 'online auction' for all members in New Zealand to participate in –
both as sellers and buyers. We are planning the auction to run over a week
period around mid June.

We will have a new 'Auction' section listed on our BSNZ website at www.
bsnz.org that will be visible and available ONLY to members that log in to
the website.

Every financial BSNZ member is able to gain a free website login that allows
you to view many bromeliad articles, past Journals – and now the online
auction page too.

If you do not currently have a login, or have forgotten what it is, all you need
to do is email David Cowie (our committee webmaster) at webmaster@
bsnz.org and he can set you up with a username and password.

If you do not have an email address or computer, you can still gain a website
login to participate, however, you will of course need to use a friend's or
family member's computer and email address. All pre and post-auction
communication for listing plants, shipping/pick-up details, payment etc
will be done via email and online banking – along the lines of 'Trade Me'
auctions.

I would therefore recommend you get your login sorted ASAP, as we are
sure to have some fantastic rare and desirable plants put up for auction
from all over the country.

If you have a special bromeliad you wish to sell at auction (reserve prices
and bare-root pups are allowed) start thinking about it now.

We will be asking for auction plant submissions in our May
Journal, along with all the details on how to make submissions
and how the auction will be run... so watch this space!

Group News

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Sandra Wheeler
Our February meeting was incorporated in
a road trip to the 'Fiesta' in Auckland. 22
members of our group attended our March
meeting and AGM at the Reyburn House
Studio.

Our new committee:

• PRESIDENT: Sandra Wheeler
Ph: 435 0007
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• VICE-PRESIDENT: Marie Wigg
Ph: 437 2840
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• SECRETARY: Nancy Peters
Ph: 437 2707
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• TREASuRER: Lynley Churches
Ph: 437 5462
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The Far North Bromeliad Group has invited
members of our group to participate in
their annual show to be held in October in
association with the Bay of Islands Orchid
Society. There will be more details later in
the year.

Overall prize winners for the 'Show and
Tell' Competition 2014/2015:

1st Pat Vendt; 2nd Laura Maton; 3rd Lyn
White. Congratulations to the winners and
thanks to everyone who entered during the
year.

March 'Show and Tell' Winners:

1st Sandra Wheeler – Vriesea 'Autumn
Vista'; 2nd Pat Vendt – Neoregelia 'Purple
Dream'; 3rd equal Laura Maton – Vriesea
'Boogie Woogie' and Lynley Churches –

Nidularium fulgens

Jill Hayward, a foundation member of our
group, was our speaker and she very kindly
brought along a number of shells from
her huge collection. We were allowed to
touch some of them and feel the different
textures. The beautiful colours were so

varied and it was interesting to see what
sea creatures create to protect themselves.

Raffles were drawn, followed by a lovely

afternoon tea.

Next Meetings: Sunday 26th April
at 1.30pm at Diana Holt's garden,
339 Mangawhai Road. As parking is very
limited we will car pool. Those with full
cars go straight to Mangawhai, otherwise
please meet at the Kensington at 12 noon
to sort out our rides from there.
Our May meeting will be on the 24th at the
home of Robyn Thomas, 52 West View
Crescent, Onerahi.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
Our April meeting was held at the garden of
Pearl and Herb Geange at Totara Heights,
with a very good turnout, considering that
it was the Easter weekend.

It is five or six years since we visited Pearl

and Herb's lovely garden and it has gone
ahead in leaps and bounds. Pearl grows
the most beautiful cactus and succulents,

and the garden sported two magnificent

elephant foot plants; properly known as
Dioscarea elephantipes. Her greenhouse
is crammed packed with the most amazing
cactus plants. The succulents and cacti
are interspersed with very colourful
bromeliads.
Roy Morton ran an amusing meeting and
reminded everyone that our Annual Sale
is on Sunday 12th April at the Auckland

Botanic Gardens commencing at 9:00am.
The raffles were won by Madeleine and

John Yolland.

Next Meeting: 1:30pm on Sunday,

3rd May at the Auckland Botanic Gardens
and this will be our AGM. Members are
asked to bring along their favourite plant.

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Lynley Breeze
Our first meeting was a very successful
open day with a magnificent plant display

arranged by Gil Keesing. It was open to
the public with six sales tables, resulting
in many happy buyers and sellers. The spot
prizes are very popular.

In March we had the AGM followed by
the 20th birthday celebration of the group.
Six of the founding members attended,
and we all enjoyed the delicious cake
baked and decorated by Diana Durrant.

Lynley Roy entertained us with amusing

anecdotes from earlier days. We recalled
when bromeliad plants were so scarce that
members were allowed to buy only one
plant per meeting. Jo Elder introduced
many of the newer bromeliads to Tauranga

by visiting the late Len Trotman and

bringing them down from Auckland.
Our group continues to thrive with well
attended meetings in our lovely venue at
the Yacht club.

'Show and Tell': There was a neoregelia
needing a name but it was not able to be

identified.

Competition:

Novice Section: 1st Diana Fiford
Neoregelia 'Rosy Morn"
Plant of the month (Small and midi
bromeliads): 1st Dean Morman

– Neoregelia 'Sweet Nellie';
2nd Elizabeth Bailey – Neoregelia
'Cayenne'; 3rd Margaret Mangos
Neoregelia 'Red of Rio'. There were
many beautiful plants tabled including
Neoregelia 'Break of Day', 'Annick' 'Wild
Tiger' and 'Altura'.
Open Competition: 1st Dean Morman –
Dyckia 'Taniwha'; 2nd Dean Morman –
Vriesea 'Frosty Fever', 3rd Gill Keesing –
Neoregelia 'Sand Flea'. Other plants tabled
were Neoregelia 'Stargazer', 'Blushing
Tiger', Nidularium fulgens.
Tillandsia Competition: 1st Dean Morman
– fasciculata x tricolor, 2nd Audrey Hewson
– tectorum var. gigantea, 3rd Gill Keesing –
Tillandsia unknown.
Next Meeting: Wednesday 13th May,
12.30pm. Sandra Simpson will speak
about taking great plant photographs. Plant

of the month: Aechmea

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
Orchid Group – Alison Iremonger

There was a good attendance at our March
meeting. Our guest speaker for the afternoon
was Mr Norm Twigge, an Entomologist,

talking on his interest in butterflies. The

meeting discussed attending the Ohope
Craft Market again as a stallholder, as well
as having an auction at one of our meetings
to sell garden collectables. Ross Fergusson
reviewed the recent Bromeliad 'Fiesta'

Show held in Auckland. Sue Laurent was

presented with a thank-you gift to show
how much her input into the group, over
many years, was appreciated.

Afternoon tea was served and members
had a chance to look around Dave and
Alison Iremonger's garden.

– Competition:
The plant topic for the day was 'a multi
coloured neoregelia'
1st Maureen Moffatt – Neoregelia 'Orange
Crush'; 2nd Alison Iremonger – Neoregelia
carolinae tricolor; 3rd Ross Fergusson –
– Neoregelia 'Stargazer'
Each month we have an interesting 'Show
and Tell', where members bring along
plants to show and stimulate discussion
and questions. Raffles were drawn and
then we had our sales table.

Next Meeting: At Ken and Sue Laurent's

home. Visitors are always welcome.

Contacts: Maureen Moffatt 07–322 2276,
Ross Fergusson 07-312 5487, Sue Laurent

07-307 1323.

Bromeliad Oddities

– Peter Paroz. Reprinted from Bromeliana (New York Bromeliad Society
November, 2014, after originally appearing in the April, 2011
newsletter of the Queensland Bromeliad Society)
Bromeliads are the only plants

where flowering can be induced
by chemical treatment. The first

report was the effect of smoky grass

fires on pineapples. Locally in spring
with the burn-off of fuel for brush fire
control, smoky grass fires have caused
occasional premature flowering in my

ornamental bromeliads. The active
agent is minute traces of ethylene in the
smoke. Most bromeliads have terminal

flower spikes (from the centre cup),

but a few plants such as Quesnelia
lateralis, Tillandsia complanata and
some dyckias and hechtias flower
laterally (from side leaf axils).

All bromeliads produce seed and most
are perennial by way of producing
offsets. However, a few bromeliads
such as Puya raimondii and Tillandsia
utriculata are monocarpic – flowering

once with no offsets. Such plants

produce copious flowers that are self

fertile and seed very freely.

At maturity, the fruit of Ronnbergia
explodens, spontaneously explodes
and squirts the mature seeds away
from the mother plant.

Tillandsia bryoides is reputedly the

smallest bromeliad and can flower

from a plant only 15mm long and 5mm
in diameter. The name derives from its
similarity to some mosses. (It is now
called Tillandsia minutifolia)

Puya raimondii is at the other end of
the scale. Imagine a bare trunk 300mm
in diameter, 3.5metre tall topped with
a one metre umbrella of very spiny
leaves two metres long; and topped

again with a 2.25 metre flower spike
with 10,000 + flowers. Locally, (in the

Andes mountains in South America)
this puya is referred to as the 'century
plant' reputedly taking 150 years

to flower. There is a reliable report

of a plant in a U.S. Botanic garden

flowering in about 70 years.

(Herb Plever, editor of Bromeliana

comments: The above size and age

estimates are on the low side. There is
a 24 year old Puya raimondii that is

now flowering at the Botanical Garden

of the University of California at
Berkley. It was grown from seed and is
already 16 feet high. They expect the
spike to reach close to 30 feet before

it starts flowering, and such a huge
inflorescence could produce as many
as 30,000 flowers!

The same Botanical Garden flowered

a 28 year old Puya raimondii in the
1960s. This species is native to the
high mountain deserts of Bolivia and
Peru where it grows at altitudes of
10,000 to 13,000 feet – well above
the tree line. So it may take nearly a

century to flower in its dry, cold and

windy high mountain environment, but

it evidently flourishes in the warmer

climate of California.)

Within the Bromeliaceae, Pitcairnia
macrochlamys is the most prolific

nectar producer with over 160mg. per
blossom.

The pineapple (Ananas comosus),
smooth cayenne, develops interfoliar
roots in the lower whorls of the leaves.

These roots have copious root hairs
and readily absorb any moisture from
dew enabling the plant to survive in dry
climates. These root hairs also readily
absorb nutrients and foliar fertilising
is common in commercial pineapple
plantations.

Dyckia fosteriana with side axil,
lateral inflorescences.
Tillandsia minutifolia, a bit over
½" – formerly called Tillandsia
bryoides.
Puya raimondii in mountain desert habitat.
PHOTO: G. RIVERA FROM WEST COAST BS NEWSLETTER, 11/2009
Puya raimondii flowers.
PHOTO: SONDERHEFT, DIE BROMELIE 4/99

This month we look at another beautiful variegated species cultivar that made

an appearance for the first time at our 2015 'Fiesta'.

Vriesea 'Galaxy'

Many of you will have the
species Vriesea glutinosa
in your collections. This
ornamental species with its scarlet,
branched flower spike, is endemic to
the northern South American island
nation of Trinidad, where it was
originally discovered in the mid 1800s
growing on rocks near a waterfall.

PHOTO: ANDREW DEVONSHIRE PHOTO: JARKA REHAK

Vriesea 'Galaxy'
Vriesea 'Galaxy'

Vriesea 'Galaxy' has an interesting
history and is thought to be a mediopicta variegated cultivar of Vriesea
glutinosa. In the past 50 years or so,
a number of large bromeliad nurseries
in Western Europe, such as DeMeyer
in Belgium, have tissue-cultured
and mass propagated many Vriesea,
Aechmea and Guzmania species in
particular, for their colourful and long-

lasting flowers.

Details are sketchy, but sometime in
the 1970s, a variegated plant under
the name Vriesea 'Splendide', was
obtained, 'probably' from the DeMeyer
nursery, by a Hungarian nurseryman.
DeMeyer made this hybrid from
the cross of Vriesea splendens x
Vriesea glutinosa in the early 1970s.

In the 1980s, Michael Ferenczi – an
Australian grower with Hungarian
ties – imported a descendant of this
variegated plant from Hungary into
Australia.

At some point it was recognised the
plant resembled the true species Vriesea
glutinosa much more than the hybrid
Vriesea 'Splendide', hence it became
known as Vriesea glutinosa variegata.
The species Vriesea glutinosa is known
for self-setting seed, so it would seem
highly likely this variegate came
about as a seedling mutation that was
subsequently mixed up with Vriesea
'Splendide' seedlings somewhere.
There were certainly variegated forms
of Vriesea 'Splendide' in circulation
around that time too, that are very
similar looking plants. One made its

way to Kent's Nursery in California,
where it became known and registered
as Vriesea 'Splendide Vista'.

In 1993, NSW nurseryman Peter
Tristram showed his mature Vriesea
glutinosa variegata (grown from a
pup ex Michael) at the Brisbane
Conference, where it won the
'Champion Of The Show' prize (see
Rehak photo). Peter subsequently
named and registered it as Vriesea
'Galaxy'.

Interestingly, other Vriesea glutinosa
variegata (Vriesea 'Galaxy') plants are
apparently not seen in other countries,
giving weight to the theory that the
plant Michael originally obtained
was either a 'one-off' or the only one
that survived its early days in Europe.

This plant is now in New Zealand
and by all accounts is a relatively
hardy cultivar. Being variegated, it
is somewhat slow to grow, but, with
a good fertiliser regime and some
protection in winter, it grows to a good
size and always makes a stunning
display with its red-on-white markings
to the leaves. One nice trait of Vriesea
glutinosa, is it's propensity to produce
masses of grass pups before blooming.
Vriesea 'Galaxy' also does this and
normally gives a good percentage
of variegated pups, as well as plain
green. We can therefore hopefully
look forward to this beauty becoming
well established in collections here in
future.

Learning about the genera : Quesnelia
– Peter Waters
A genus of 23 species endemic to Eastern Brazil, Quesnelia, like Billbergia,
is divided into two subgenera. Subgenus Quesnelia consists of four species
with strobilate or cone-shaped inflorescences, and subgenus Billbergiopsisgenerally smaller and more like Billbergia in form and shape of inflorescence.

Their habitat is mainly coastal
sandy areas near sea-level
where they grow in large mats
with some epiphytic and growing up
to 1500 metres in coastal mountain
ranges. Because of their natural habitat
they are relatively easy to grow in
New Zealand. Although most are not
spectacular of foliage they have bright
and colourful inflorescences though
rather short-lived like billbergias. The
following species are known in New
Zealand and are well worth the effort
to add to your collection.

Quesnelia arvensis is one of the largest
species growing in damp swampy
conditions at sea-level. It has banded
leaves with spines and a large cone

shaped pink flower with purple petals.

Quesnelia quesneliana is a
stoloniferous plant that grows in dense
mats on the sandy shores of Rio de

Janeiro in full sun. Inflorescence is

pink torch-like with white petals tipped
with lavender blue.

Quesnelia testudo like the previous
two species is in subgenus Quesnelia
and is found growing terrestrially in
coastal shrub. It is a largish, upright

plant with a cylindrical inflorescence

differing from the arvensis and
quesneliana by having scape bracts.

Quesnelia imbricata is a smallish
plant with green leaves somewhat
purple-tinged and a bright pinkish red

inflorescence.

Quesnelia humilis is a small tubular
plant 250mm with long stolons and

brilliant red and blue inflorescence.

Quesnelia liboniana is a small few-

leaved tubular species with flowers

with the unusual combination of navy
blue and orange. Very stoloniferous
and great for tree cultivation.

Quesnelia indecora is very like a
billbergia with narrow green tubes
on stolons and a nodding bright pink

floral bracts and petals.

Quesnelia lateralis is a novelty in that

the inflorescence comes from the base.

It has bright red bracts and ming blue
petals.

Quesnelia seideliana also has
yellowish bracts and blue petals but
from the central vase. The green leaves
have some banding and dark spines
and grows as an epiphyte.

Quesnelia marmorata is one of the
most popular species with its grey-
green and maroon marbled tubes and
stunning pink and blue billbergia-like

inflorescence. And even more so after

the discovery of the cultivar 'Tim
Plowman' with its curled leaves which
attracts huge attention.

Quesnelia edmundoi is a very
distinctive member of the genus,
with foliage resembling Canistrum

Quesnelia arvensis (red form)
PHOTO: GRAEME BARCLAY
fosterianum or Aechmea fosteriana.

The inflorescence is a smallish yellow

cone. The variety rubrobracteata
has reddish foliage and a red cone
with white petals. There is also a
variety intermedia which is somewhat
between the other two varieties. They
do not resemble the other species in
Quesnelia and it is very likely that they
will become members of a new genus
in the future.

Quesnelia arvensis
PHOTO: GRAEME BARCLAY
Quesnelia quesneliana
PHOTO: CAROL EVANS
Quesnelia testudo

PHOTO: GRAEME BARCLAY

More photos on P20 19

Quesnelia imbricata Quesnelia humilis

PHOTO: HAWI WINTER PHOTO: GRAEME BARCLAY

More Quesnelia photos...

Quesnelia liboniana Quesnelia indecora

PHOTO: CAROL EVANS PHOTO: CAROL EVANS

Quesnelia lateralis
PHOTO: HAWI WINTER
20

 

May 2015VOL 55 NO 5
• Learning about the genera: Orthophytum
• ‘Bromsmatta’ conference report • Eden Garden revisited
Nidularium procerum (Leme 550). Photo: Peter Waters

Bromeliad Society April Meeting News

– Notes by Bev Ching. Photos by Dave Anderson.
The April meeting opened with the the species Hohenbergia edmundoi,
Special General Meeting of the with the owner wanting to know when
Society that was called to present to pollinate the flowers, however the
the annual financial statement. plant was not yet ready for pollination.

This plant is quite stunning with a tall
The general monthly meeting followed bulbous look, and silvery grey foliage.
the Special General Meeting. This Next was an Aechmea ‘Blue Ice’. A
started with ‘Show and Tell’. First was green leaf stoloniferous plant, but when

Photos from April meeting…

Billbergia ‘Strawberry’ x
‘Domingos Martins’
– Peter Waters. First in
open foliage section
Nidularium atalaiaense –
Dave Anderson. First in
monthly choice section
Vriesea ‘Hill #96’ –
Peter Coyle. First inopen flowering section
Neoregelia ‘Pink Spider’ – John Mitchell.
First in neoregelia section
Tillandsia violacea – Dave Anderson.
First in tillandsia section and ‘Plant of
the Month’

the pups come up they are very frilly

and crisp around the edges. It had blue
petals, almost a cone like shape. Once
fully grown the frilliness disappears.
Next up was a Tillandsia erici . This
species comes from Bolivia and had a

beautiful orange flower. Also a Vriesea

‘Golden Legend’ which had a strange
leaf formation, it looked like two plants
in the middle with the leaves formed

together. Other members had struck this
with other plants. Next was Aechmea
andersonii, this species comes from

Bahia, Brazil. This was named after John
Anderson. Lastly looking for a name was
Alcantarea imperialis (rubra), with its
typical Alcantarea imperialis leaves.
Graeme Barclay then showed photos
from the ‘Bromsmatta’ conference held

two weeks ago. Graeme also went north

with Peter Tristram visiting gardens
along the way until they reached Peter’s

place. One thing that stood out from the

photos was how large Australia can grow
these plants, some up to two metres wide

and at least a metre tall.
The special raffle went to Tonia Adams.
The door prizes to Lester Ching, Judy
Graham and Genneth Marshall-Inman.


COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First was Peter Coyle
with a Herb Hill hybrid from Florida
called Vriesea ‘Hill #96’. Second
was Graeme Barclay with Vriesea
botafogensis, very similar colouring
to Vriesea saundersii with a yellow
spike. Also on the table was Guzmania
wittmackii, always popular and
Neoregelia ‘Chili Verde’.

Open Foliage: Peter Waters with

Billbergia ‘Strawberry’ x ‘Domingos
Martins’, a deep strawberry spotted
plant was first. Second was Billbergia
‘Kawana Moon Drops’ a large green
spotted billbergia. Also on the table were

Aechmea nudicaulis var capitata, a deep
maroon plant, grown in high light and
grows well in Auckland, Vriesea ‘Jungle
Jade’ hybrid, Billbergia ‘Strawberry’,
Neoregelia ‘Catlinite’, Vriesea ospinae
gruberi x ‘Tiger Tim’, Vriesea ospinae
gruberi, Vriesea ospinae gruberi

‘Angela’.
Tillandsia: First was Dave Anderson’s


Tillandsia violacea a large species plant

with a hanging flower spike. Second was

Lynette Nash with Tillandsia ‘Luscious

Lissa’ with five plants mounted on
driftwood.
Neoregelia: First was John Mitchell

with the cultivar Neoregelia ‘Pink

Spider’. The plant was well grown and
vibrant pink colour. This is a pendula
type plant. It is a cross between pendula
and eleutheropetala. Second was Peter
Coyle with Neoregelia ‘Alcatraz’. In the
competition was Neoregelia ‘Jewellery
Shop’, Neoregelia ampullacea x
lilliputiana, Neoregelia ‘Highlander’,
Neoregelia ‘Lamberts Pride’, Neoregelia
‘Rio Ochre’, Neoregelia ‘Canefire’,
Neoregelia ‘Wee Willy’ x (‘Tiger Cub’
x ‘Black Knight’) and Neoregelia
ampullacea x carolinae tricolor.
Monthly Choice – Nidularium: first
was Dave Anderson with Nidularium
atalaiaense from Brazil where is grows

on the beach in the sand. Grows well
here and needs high light to bring the
deep colour out, green petals. Second
was David Goss with Nidularium
innocentii var paxianum, a green plant

with red cup of white flowers. Also

in the competition were Nidularium
regelioides, Nidularium rutilans and two
more Nidularium atalaiaense.
The Plant of the Month went to Dave
Anderson with Tillandsia violacea.
Congratulations to all the winners.


NEXT MEETING: Tues 26th May.


Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – May 2015 issue


CONTENTS
Bromeliad Society April meeting news – Bev Ching 2
President’s Page – Graeme Barclay 5
‘Special Species Spotlight’ – Graeme Barclay 6
‘Bromsmatta’ conference report – Graeme Barclay 8
BSNZ rare plant online auction – Graeme Barclay 10
A winter cover-up – Ann Boon 11
Learning about the genera: Orthophytum – Peter Waters 13
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 16
Group News 17
Eden Garden on the first day of May – Murray Mathieson 19

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 17 for details of group meeting

times and venues.

MAY
24th Northland Group meeting
26th Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and

Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The

Monthly Choice competition: Bigeneric

plants. There will be a discussion

on our new online auction system

and procedures. There will also be a

PowerPoint of Elton Leme’s presentation
at the ‘Cool Broms’ Australasian

bromeliad conference.

JUNE

7th South Auckland group meeting
10th Bay of Plenty group meeting
14th Tillandsia group meeting
14th – 21st BSNZ online auction. See
page 10 of this Journal for full details.

23rd Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and

Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The

Monthly Choice competition: Neoregelia
lilliputiana and hybrids. This meeting
will also be followed by our mid-winter
supper. Please bring a plate!

FRONT COVER:

From Peter Waters. This is the post-anthesis (after flowering) inflorescence of
Nidularium procerum (Leme 550). The primary bracts were a bright red several
months ago and have now turned purple, thus helping to prove that Neoregelia
‘Litmus’ was correctly identified as a procerum and not antoineanum, as it was
originally thought. This procerum is quite large, the plant itself over 1.2 metres wide
and the inflorescence 300mm. wide.


PRESIDENT’S PAGE

Hi everyone. We are fresh
back from the ‘Bromsmatta’
bromeliad conference that was
recently held in Parramatta, Sydney.
As you will see from our feature in this
Journal, it was another good conference
and a great chance to catch up with
numerous friends from Australia and
the USA. It was especially nice to also
still hear a number of complimentary
comments about how great our 2013
‘Cool Broms’ conference was. We also
had a number of Australian bromeliad
folks join the BSNZ, simply because
they have heard or seen from friends
how good our Kiwi Journal is – such
positive things are nice to see!

On behalf of the BSNZ,

congratulations and welcome to all the

new committees and officers elected

in and around our various regional

bromeliad groups. We hope your
memberships stay healthy and your
groups continue to bring enjoyment
to everyone involved in them. Please

do ensure you have your group’s news

regularly sent in by the first Tuesday

of each month to our editor Murray,
so he can include it in the monthly

Journal and keep everyone up to date.

Once again, on behalf of our editorial

committee, we would also love to
receive more articles and photos

from any of the regional groups to

include in the Journal. Maybe an

easy idea is simply to email in a few
garden or collection photos and a
short paragraph or two on a special

member where you hold your monthly
meetings? It’s always nice to feature
different gardens, members and

collections for others to see how you

are growing things. Remember, you
are all very welcome to contribute,

so please give it some thought and

start the articles flowing through.

I would like to offer special thanks to
David Anderson for his many years of
duty as secretary of the BSNZ. Dave
has stepped down this year but will

still remain on the committee to help
out and assist our new secretary, Bev

Ching, as required. We are very lucky
to have dedicated members such as
Dave and Bev to help keep the society
running in a positive way.

Finally, I look forward to seeing
plenty of members participating in
our inaugural BSNZ ‘Online Rare
Plant Auction’ in June. Please check

out the ‘auction page’ in this issue
for all the details and don’t forget to
mark the dates on your calendars

and diaries – go and do it now!

Cheers, Graeme Barclay

A NEW BRAZILIAN WEBSITE…

Oscar Ribeira, proprietor of Bromeliário Imperialis, has a new website with a
treasure trove of habitat and species information and photographs of bromeliads
in different regions of Brazil. Well worth checking it out at:

http://imperialis.com.br.


This month we look at a beautiful small species discovered in Brazil only twelve
years ago that has an interesting Kiwi connection.

Canistrum ‘Vania Leme’

Our Scientific Officer and

Treasurer, Peter Waters, is

responsible for registering this

outstanding species cultivar and was

part of the original collection party.
Here is what Peter wrote about it in the
2008 BSI Journal Vol 58(2), page 73…

A bromeliad species rare in cultivation
is Canistrum auratum Leme. In Elton
Leme’s 1997 book ‘Canistrum -
Bromeliads of the Atlantic Forest’ it says
about this plant, which was previously
subject to only two collections’……..
‘At today’s deforestation rates, it has

become increasingly difficult, or even
impossible, to find this species again in

the wild. There are very few specimens
of C. auratum in cultivation. All arose
from the original clone, which does not
guarantee the survival of this species
ex situ.’

On an expedition to Bahia, Brazil
in September 2003, our team, which
consisted of Elton Leme, Raymundo
Reis, Jose Falcon, Carlos Moreira,
Edmundo Silva, Marlon Machado and
Peter and Jeanette Waters, discovered a
new population of Canistrum auratum
in the county of Barra do Choca near
the city of Vitoria da Conquista and
the same day, a few kilometres away,

in a small fragment of Atlantic Forest
at about 600m elevation made an even

more dramatic find of a new cultivar of

the same species.This new and striking
plant has wonderfully marked and
banded foliage in shades of purple and
dark-brown in addition to its attractive

orange and yellow inflorescence, and

is sure to be highly sought after in the
horticultural world.

Because leaf colour is not recognized

as sufficient reason for varietal status,

it is intended to assign a cultivar name
to this new introduction, and it gives
me great pleasure to name it Canistrum
‘Vania Leme’ after the beautiful wife of
our friend, Elton Leme, the foremost
authority on Brazilian bromeliads.
Vania fully deserves the recognition for
many years of support of her husband’s
work.

That says it all and gives you a clear

idea on the diversity of bromeliad

genera and how many different

plants are likely being lost to

deforestation in South American
countries – many unfortunately

before they are even discovered.

This lovely cultivar is quite compact
at around 25cm high and 20cm wide


when fully grown. It is now becoming
well established in New Zealand
collections and is proving to be an
excellent, vigorous grower. It likes

warm growing conditions, protection

from winter cold and needs bright light

all year round to attain and maintain

the dark brown tones to the leaves

and an optimal bottle-shaped form.

With these conditions, if placed in a

reasonably large pot with adequate

fertiliser in the warmer growing
seasons, it will readily put out new
pups on woody stolons and form a

beautiful clump within only two to
three years.

Canistrum ‘Vania Leme’
PHotoS: G. BArCLAy

‘Bromsmatta' photos…
Neoregelia ‘Larnach’s Enchantment’. Tillandsia ‘Silver Queen’.
First neoregelia. PHoto: GrAEME BArCLAy Show champion. PHoto: PEtEr CoyLE


Hohenbergia rosea in bloom at
Sydney royal Botanical Gardens.
PHoto: GrAEME BArCLAy
Deuterocohnia brevifolia. Best species.

PHoto: GrAEME BArCLAy


Plant sales WoW! PHoto: MEryL tHoMAS Main display. PHoto: MEryL tHoMAS


‘Bromsmatta’…
bromeliad conference report


– Graeme Barclay
The Bromeliad Society of Australia
hosted the ‘Bromsmatta’ 18th
Australasian bromeliad conference
in the Novotel Hotel in Parramatta, Sydney
from April 16th to 19th . There were around
140 registrants from as far afield as Florida
and Perth, as well as 17 Kiwis in total.

The conference started in a similar format
to ‘Cool Broms 2013’ with a popular ‘10

10-10 Raffle’ on Thursday afternoon,

to allow 10 lucky winners access to the

plant sales room for 10 minutes before
everyone else to select up to 10 plants.

Plant sales continued at various time over

the next 3 days… by all accounts probably

the most successful sale in conference

history. The conference competitive

show, while quite small in size, featured

some lovely specimens, a number quite

different and larger in size to what we are

used to seeing at our own ‘Fiesta’ show.

On Friday morning the guest speaker
presentations began with 12 excellent
talks being delivered by Sunday
lunchtime. Andy Siekkinen from San
Diego gave two slide-show talks on
Hechtia and Tillandsia in Mexico; Dennis
Cathcart from Tropiflora Florida also
gave slide-shows about his recent habitat
trips to Brazil. There were interesting
and informative presentations by Doug
Cross on Cryptanthus; Laurie Dorfer
on bromeliad fungal diseases; Dr.Teresa
Bert on growing uncommon bromeliad
genera; Bruce Dunstan on Guzmania and
Pitcairnia in Colombian habitats; Pamela
Koide-Hyatt on Tillandsia hybrids; Nigel
Thomson on hybridising theories; and
Peter Tristram on the ‘Wow Factor’ of
collecting special bromeliads.

With no scheduled garden visits, on the
Saturday, after morning tea, around 70
registrants took an optional coach tour
into the city centre to visit the Sydney
Royal Botanical Gardens (next to the

Opera House), followed by a pleasant
and relaxing 3 hour harbour cruise. The

gardens have many different plantings

with some interesting bromeliad areas

– especially for a Kiwi! There were
large clumps of flowering Hohenbergia
rosea and H. correia-araujoi, as well
as Aechmea ramosa, Ae. blanchetiana,
Ae. aquilega and Neoregelia cruenta
‘Goldilocks’ – all lovely large plants not
often seen in bloom in New Zealand.
The harbour cruise took us back up the

Parramatta River, where our coaches

collected us from the wharf.

The conference banquet and auction
was on Sunday evening, with a number
of bromeliad books and memorabilia

up for auction and fetching healthy

prices. Earlier, at the conference

meeting, it was resolved to form a new
‘Australasian Bromeliad Council’, with
initial representation from all Australian
States and New Zealand, to oversee
conference matters and facilitate societies

working closer together. The Gold Coast

Bromeliad Society was announced as

the host for the 2019 conference. This

will follow the ‘Sunny Broms’ 2017

conference being hosted in late March that
year by The Sunshine Coast Bromeliad
Society in Caloundra. These conferences
are sure to be fabulous events and are
both ideal locations to have a holiday, so,

start planning to attend now with the kiwi

contingent!


BSNZ Rare Plant Online Auction…
On June 14th to 21st!


– Graeme Barclay
As mentioned in the Journal last

month, the BSNZ in running

a new ‘Rare Plant Online
Auction’ for all BSNZ members to
participate in. This initiative has
been implemented to provide more
members easy access to buying and
selling a wider range of quality, rare
bromeliads. We also hope it will
boost nationwide interaction and
camaraderie amongst members and
increase usage of the BSNZ website.

The first auction will be run over

a week-long period, starting from
7:00pm Sunday 14th June until finishing
the evening of Sunday 21st June. Here
are the key things you need to know to

get started.

HOw TO SUBMIT PLANTS TO
SELL IN THE AUCTION…

1. Any BSNZ member from any
location in New Zealand can submit
a plant to auction (maximum 3).
If you wish to do so, please email
Graeme at gray.barclay@xtra.
co.nz with the following pieces of
information included for each plant;
a) Put the correct name (or hybrid
formula) of your plant in the email
subject line. (Make a separate email

for each plant submitted please).

b) Attach at least one colour photo

(up to 3 are allowed) clearly showing

your plant’s features and advise
approximate size (diameter x height in

cm). Also whether it is a bare-root pup,
seedling, potted mature etc.

c) Advise any history / selling points
/ provenance / rarity notes / special

growing conditions it requires – i.e:

text you would like listed on the

auction page to help enthuse buyers.

d) Advise your reserve price

(minimum bid) that you would
like listed on the auction.

e) Advise your name and location

(town or city). Your name WILL NOT
be listed on the auction, but your
location WILL be.

2. Auction plant submissions must
be emailed any time from Friday
May 22nd to 7:00pm Friday June
11th to be eligible for inclusion. You
will then be emailed to confirm if
your plant is accepted for the auction.
Your plant will be listed by the auction
admin team, so you do not have to
do anything else at this point other

than watch the fun unfold online.

3. Bromeliads ONLY will be accepted
for auction and must be generally
considered rare, special or highly


desirable in some way to most other
members. Common / low value
plants will not be accepted. All
plants must be healthy and clean.

4. Please read the auction procedures
and rules posted on the BSNZ
website for further information re
payments, commission, delivery,
shipping etc for sellers and buyers.
(See below under ‘How to Bid’ where
to look on the website).

HOw TO BId ON PLANTS IN
THE AUCTION…

Simply login to the website with your
username and password at www.
bsnz.org and click on the ‘BSNZ
Rare Plant Auction’ tab in the menu
when it appears. There you will find

a linked page with full instructions

on bidding, payment, receiving plants

and the rules of the auction. Please

familiarise yourself with these then

you are free to bid during the auction
period. Any financial BSNZ member
with a login can bid on any plant listed
at any time before the auction ends.

If you do not have a login, or have

forgotten what it is, all you need

to do is email David Cowie (our
webmaster) at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

and he can set you up immediately

with a username and password.

We look forward to plenty of members
participating in both buying and
selling to support the society. If it goes

well, we will look to schedule future

auctions under the same format. So
don’t be shy, spread the word, join

in the fun and let’s make it a success
for all ….and please mark yourcalendars and diaries NOw so you
don’t forget!

A winter cover-up

– Ann Boon. Reprinted from Bromeliad Society of N.S.W,
Bromeliad Newsletter, July 1991.
As soon as the nights start to get
cooler it is time to make sure
your plants are comfortably
‘bedded down’ for the winter.

First, clean any foreign matter out
of the cups. I use a small paint brush
which I find ideal, but buy a new one
and use it for no other purpose. Gently
turn the brush around in the cup. If you
spread the fingers of both hands out and
over the top of the pot, you will find

that you will be able to form a ‘web’

over the soil and at the same time get a
grasp of the pot and use the tips of the

fingers to support the plant at the base.
In this way, when tipping the pot on its

side to empty the water out of the cup,
the soil loss is cut down to a minimum

and the plant is not disturbed.

Next, cut away any dead or yellowing

leaves by cutting the leaf down the
centre from tip to base. Now hold the

Cont’d P12 11


plant firmly in one hand and gently

tear the leaf, one half at a time, away
from the plant, working from the cut

at the centre to the outside. If you have

to trim any leaves always re-shape the

tips the same as the leaf grows. If the
plants have been outside during the

summer months, clean out any dead
leaves or grass which may have lodged

in amongst the leaves. Pull out any
weeds growing in the pots. This does

not include those lovely little ferns that

decide to come and ‘board with the
broms’ from time to time.

If any plants need propping up they can
be tied to a small stake, but sometimes
I find it difficult to tie it firmly without
altering the contour of the leaves.
Lucky stones can be used but there is
the danger of an offset being damaged
should it come up underneath before
the stone is removed. A wire support
can also be made from a coat hanger.

No hard and fast rules can be set down

for watering during the cold weather

but it is important to remember

that more plants are lost due to

OVERWATERING.

The needs of plants vary considerably,

to the size and type of pot (plants in
terracotta need more watering than

those in plastic), the soil, whether

it holds the water or is porous, the
environment in which the plant is
growing and the special needs of the

plant itself (does it grow in habitats
where it is wet or dry, rainfall, etc.?). If
in doubt keep the soil only SLIGHTLY
MOIST AND THE LEAVES DRY
during extreme cold spells. Use a
paddle pop stick to test the soil.

If possible, turn the bulbous tillandsias
planted on bark in an upside-down

position so that the plant will not

become waterlogged during any wet
weather Water other tillandsias VERY,
VERY SPARINGLY. Water the SOIL
ONLY of cryptanthus, keeping the
leaves dry. The hardier bromeliads
may be given a very light spray from
the hose to freshen the foliage but pick

a warm day and do it early so that

they have dried off before the night air
begins to settle.

If, through lack of space, some plants
have to be left out in the open, try to

arrange them in the most protected

spot but not pushed into a damp corner
which gets no sun. Make a portable

fence with wire netting and a few
stakes threaded through at regular

intervals. This can be put around the
plants and fastened together with a tie.

Make a tent using hessian or an old

sheet (not plastic) and tie to the wire.

This makes a good cover especially if

frosts are expected.

This programme may be too time-
consuming for members with extensive
collections but I have written it as a
guide for new members with small
collections.

Finally, it is a good idea to keep notes

on the things you do during the year,

so that you can compare and possibly

change or improve your programme

next year. Don’t rely on your memory.
Just when you need it most it has a
nasty habit of letting you down!


Learning about the genera : Orthophytum
– Peter Waters
Orthophytum is an endemic
species of Brazil living in
rocky habitats in Espirito
Santo. Minas Gerais and Bahia states
predominantly with a few north of
there. They are exclusively terrestrial
and saxicolous on rocky escarpments
in the region of the Atlantic Forest.

In 1979 there were only 17 species of
Orthophytum, in 2004, 34 species, but
by 2014 this number had swelled to 67.

In 2004 Elton Leme sorted them
into subcomplexes, amoenum with a
sessile or scapeless (no flower stalk)

Cont’d P15

Orthophytum burle-marxii
PHoto: PEtEr WAtErS
Orthophytum navioides
PHoto: PAiroJ SuttHiSErEPonG
Orthophytum vagans
PHoto: GrAEME BArCLAy
Orthophytum saxicola
PHoto: toDD CLAyton
More photos on P14

Orthophytum photos…

Orthophytum sucrei

PHoto: AnDrEW DEVonSHirE

Orthophytum gurkenii

PHoto: rAnEy LiEn


Orthophytum disjunctum

PHoto: AnDrEW DEVonSHirE

Orthophytum foliosum

PHoto: DEnniS CAtHCArt


Orthophytum maracasense Orthophytum lemei

PHoto: DErEk ButCHEr PHoto: DEnniS HECkArt

14


Cont’d from P13 – Learning about the genera: Orthophytum

inflorescence, including navioides and
burle-marxii; and subcomplex vagans
also with a sessile inflorescence, but
with a caulescent or long stem.

The other subcomplexes have an
inflorescence on a scape; subcomplexes

disjunctum and mello-barretoi have a

distinct rosette but differ in some flower
details, and subcomplex leprosum has
no rosette but the leaves just grow as
scape bracts.

Subcomplex disjunctum is the largest
group with over 30 species and
includes saxicola, magalhaesii and
sucrei.

Many Orthophytum are rather small,

one or two very small, but there are

large ones as Orthophytum horridum

can be 1.4 meters high when flowering
Because of their natural habitat they

prefer warmer conditions, and can

suffer during winter. They are found in

the same general area as Hohenbergia

so need some protection from frosts.
They can tolerate very bright light to
full sun but can look better if given
a little shade. While they grow in

extremely harsh conditions in nature
and can survive much neglect they
will appreciate good watering and high
levels of fertiliser to make them grow

fast and produce more offsets. They

are very like Cryptanthus in many
respects and the formation of offsets is

similar. If taken off too early they are

quite reticent in rooting and grow very

slowly.

There are not many Orthophytum spp.
In New Zealand but you may come

across the following:

Orthophytum burle-marxii and
navioides have the distinctive flat
appearance when flowering and their
leaves turn brilliant shades of red,
Orthophytum navioides has very fine
leaves which are somewhat fragile. It
is a parent of the hybrids ‘Blaze’ and
‘Copper Penny’ which are reasonably
common.

Orthophytum vagans grows up a stem

and becomes suffused with red as it
nears flowering. It is the other parent

of ‘Copper Penny’ and also has an

attractive variegated form.

Orthophytum saxicola is a small
growing spiny plant that pups readily
on stolons and makes a clump very

quickly.

Orthophytum gurkenii is one of the

most common species with its zebra
banding on the succulent leaves and its
elevated inflorescence. Offsets grow
on the spike after flowering. A cultivar

with silvery leaves in Orthophytum

‘Warren Loose’.

Orthophytum sucrei has long stolons
and is also one of the smaller species,

but makes a great show if given good
light.

Orthophytum disjunctum has silver-
grey rigid leaves and can grow up to

400mm when flowering.

Other species which have been
seen here but are much harder to
come by are foliosum, fosterianum,
lemei, macroflorum, magalhaesii,
maracasense and toscanoi.


OFFICERS


Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Secretary: Bev Ching 09-576 4595
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters


Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451

David Cowie 09-630 8220

Chris Paterson 09-625 6707

Diane Timmins 09-415 9066

Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONdENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson

Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee

or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month

display Advertising

Rates are:

Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

‘Buy & Swap’

Listings in ‘Buy & Swap’ are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Group News

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Nancy Peters
Our April meeting was held at Diana

Holt’s garden, 339 Mangawhai Road,

Mangawhai. President Sandra Wheeler
welcomed 27 members and thanked
Diana for having our group to her
home. Diana said we were the first
group to visit her since she bought the

one acre property three years ago and

she has been transforming it from a
very run down area (with 1935 house)

since she ran out of room to store her

bromeliad and clivia collections at her
Auckland property. Diana said she
has been a member of the Bromeliad

Society for 20 years and her interest

began as an eight year old helping her

grandmother and growing her own

succulents.

April ‘Show & Tell’ Competition:

1st Maureen Green – Neoregelia
‘Empress’; 2nd equal Don Nicholson

– Tillandsia rotundata and Sandra
Wheeler – Vriesea ‘Jewel’.
Congratulations to the winners.
Raffles were drawn and the meeting
closed at 2.30pm. We then toured
Diana’s garden, shade houses and

extensive plant collections and
admired the new plantings of trees and

shrubs and garden beds. We also had
the opportunity to buy bromeliads and
clivias etc. before afternoon tea.

Next Meeting: Sunday 24th May at

1.30pm at Robyn Thomas’s garden,
52 West View Crescent, Onerahi.

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad
and Orchid Group

– Alison Iremonger
Ross Fergusson welcomed members

and visitors to our April meeting

hosted by Ken and Sue Laurent. Their

garden always looks amazing and is

the kind of garden most bromeliad and

orchid enthusiasts would dearly love

to own. Robert Flanagan was the guest

speaker and he spoke on his interest in

tillandsias. The competition for the day

was tillandsias and there were an array

of plants on display. A highlight of
Robert and Margaret Flanagan’s stay

with Ken and Sue was the releasing

of a baby kiwi chick named ‘Anzac’.

Wilma gave a short report on the

recent Te Puke Orchid Show. Members
are getting behind the ‘donated’ plants
ideas where the plants are being readied
for an upcoming craft market stall. Our
meeting in July will be a workshop
meeting. Ross asked for ideas from
members to incorporate into this day.
Our September meeting will be a
bus trip to Tauranga, visiting gardens
and nurseries. A long-term plan is
to see how many members would be

interested in going to Australia to

attend a conference. Afternoon tea was
served and some members took the

opportunity to have a look around the
garden, and vote for the tillandsia they

liked the most.

Competition:

1st R. Fergusson – Tillandsia
streptophylla; 2nd A. Iremonger
Tillandsia bergeri; 3rd G. Fergusson
Tillandsia butzii. Sue, Wilma, Pam,

Cont’d P18 17


Cont’d from P17– Group News

Stewart, Jo and Ross all had something

to add to the ‘Show and Tell” part of

the meeting. Raffles were drawn.
Members bought plants from the sales
table and also took plants from the
‘free’ section.

Next Meeting: 17th May. Visitors
are always welcome. Contacts: Ross
Fergusson 07-312 5487; Maureen

Moffatt 07-322 2276; Sue Laurent 07

307 1323.

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Lynley Breeze
This meeting followed a different
format and instead of having a speaker

we had a fun auction. Alec Roy, our

entertaining auctioneer did a wonderful

job, assisted by Roger Allen. Lynley

Roy arranged the auction cards and

number allocation and noted down
the buyers. There were some great

donations; pickles, jams and fruit

produce were especially popular. Many
good bromeliads changed hands. The
club raised over $500.00 which we
will put towards a donation of $250 to
both the local hospice and the St John’s
ambulance service. It was a lot of fun,
with many bargains and we would
recommend this for other groups. We

did not have the usual ‘Plant of the

Month’ or competitions.

Next Meeting: Wednesday 10th

June. Barry Curtis will speak about
growing orchids. Plants of the month
will be Nidularium and Canistropsis.
There will be a committee meeting at
11.30am.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marie Healey
We held our Annual General Meeting,
Sunday May 3rd at the Auckland

Botanical Gardens. It was a lovely

sunny day and car parks were very hard

to find. Marie Healey was re-elected as
President for another year. Members
had been asked to bring along their
favourite bromeliads and give a brief
talk about the growing conditions
they have them in. There were some
amazing plants. Raffles were won by
Delma Pell, Nancy Murphy and Brian
Sherson.

Next Meeting: June 7th, at the
Auckland Botanic Gardens. Our guest
speaker will be Andrew Maloy, with
his subject being vrieseas.

Tillandsia Group – Nancy Murphy

The April meeting of the group was
held at Larry and Nancy Murphy’s

garden. It was noted that a few hardy
tillandsias have been applied to drift
word sculptures in the garden but the
bulk of the collection is in the original
plastic house. Several plants where
brought along for discussion and

Lynette Nash’s artistically arranged
Tillandsia funckiana (refer photo in

April Journal on page 6) was now in
flower and each wee plant held aloft
a red-orange flower. The horizontal
staging obviously contributed to the
grand display. It was resolved to
continue bi-monthly meetings.
Next Meeting: June 14th at Lynette
Nash’s garden at 11 Westbury Crescent.
Remuera, at 1.00pm. New members
are always welcome.


Eden Garden on the first day of May…

– Notes and photos by Murray Mathieson
It was lovely late Autumn morning
when we visited the ‘Bromeliad
Glade’ at the beautiful Eden
Garden, in the heart of Auckland, to
catch up on all the great work that is
being done by our dedicated group of
ladies from the Bromeliad Society.

Isla McGowan, Lynette Nash, Diane
Timmins, Joan Anderson and Margaret

Bramley meet at the ‘Glade’ on the

first Friday morning of every month
and their combined ‘TLC’ is really
making a difference. Visitors are now
treated to tidy paths and beds and
many attractive new plantings. Some

of the planting and tidying up work
they are performing around and up the

steep rocky outcrops is definitely not
for the faint hearted!

On the May morning we visited, the

‘team’ were concentrating on thinning
out and removing large clumps of

Ochagavia litoralis that had been

threatening to take over a couple of the

main planting beds. The remedial work

has immediately made more planting

space available.

The ‘Bromeliad Glade’, and Eden
Garden, is well worth a visit and as

a bonus the garden café serves great
coffee and delicious food. If you’d like

to help out and join our team of society

volunteers please ring Isla McGowan,
Tel: 524 8733. Eden Garden is at 24
Omana Ave. Epsom www.edengarden.
co.nz


the entrance to the ‘Glade’.


Women at work.

More photos on P20 19


Eden Garden…


the morning light is
attractive in the ‘Glade’.
Margaret Bramleycontemplates her next move.
Diane timmins, isla McGowan, Margaret
Bramley and Joan Anderson.

Lynette nash establishes
some new plantings.


isla McGowan. in the thick of it.

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