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2014

2014 Journals

January 2014 February 2014 March 2014 April 2014 May 2014 June 2014 July 2014 August 2014 September 2014 October 2014 November 2014

 une 2014
VOL 54 NO 6
A group of Edmundoa lindenii var. rosea in McGregor Smith's Matapouri garden in Northland.
Photo by Graeme Barclay.

June 2014
VOL 54 NO 6
in McGregor Smith's Matapouri garden in Northland.
Photo by Graeme Barclay.

By Graeme Barclay
To go with our study of the genus Edmundoa this month, we also take a close
look at the only registered Edmundoa cultivar to date.

Edmundoa 'Alvim Seidel'

In 1976, Mr. Alvim Seidel of Corupá, catalogue as Canistrum lindenii var.
Santa Catarina State, Brazil, published exiguum variegatum. The price was
a plant for sale in his bromeliad US$120.00, which at the time was a

E. 'Alvim Seidel' mounted clump – PhOtO K. tAte
E. 'Alvim Seidel' (Medio-picta variegated)
PhOtO K. tAte
E. 'Alvim Seidel' (Albomarginated)
PhOtO K. tAte

lot of money! The green leaves had
stunning ivory stripes of variegation,
but it is uncertain exactly where it
originated, as there is no mention of
one in any earlier literature or plant
descriptions by botanists. One can only
assume it was collected in the wild as
a variegated sport and hence due to its
high ornamental value, was multiplied
for sale at Seidel's nursery.

Eventually by 1979, the plant had
made its way to Kent's bromeliad
nursery in California, USA, where it
was sold as Canistrum lindenii forma
exiguum 'Albomarginata' – price
US$75.00. Interestingly, Kent's also
advertised for sale at the time the

same plant but with suffix 'Variegata'

– Price US$25.00, which seems to
point to the fact that at some point an
albomarginated sport was produced
– perhaps from one of the original
variegated plants sent ex Siedel?
Whether originally both variegated and
albomarginated forms were sent from
Brazil is not clear, but both quickly
found their way into cultivation and
hence became highly sought after
around the world. By 1983, both forms
were in Australia and probably soon
after made it to New Zealand, though
when this occurred is not certain. Of
course, in 1997 the genus Edmundoa
was created, which encompassed
the Canistrum lindenii species, so
their genus name was amended to
Edmundoa, as we know them today.
Most of these lovely plants seem
to have stable variegations that

successfully pass on to their pups,
though it has been noted that some
forms can produce lineated or irregular
variegation, to it almost disappearing.
For this reason, in 2009 Derek Butcher

– the BSI Cultivar Registrar at the
time - decided to honour the original
grower by registering the plants as
Edmundoa 'Alvim Seidel', which
covers all forms of variegation –
including albomargination. This is
something to remember, while it can
be confusing that they look different,
they ALL have the same name!
Edmundoa 'Alvim Seidel' can grow to
over 1 metre diameter and prefers shady
locations and a moist environment
to look its best. It handles the colder
weather well, so is perfect as a New
Zealand garden specimen. It makes
a fantastic feature plant, especially if
it can be raised above other plants or
mounted on tree stumps or ponga logs
etc, allowing the variegations to be
fully admired.

A final interesting point, is that with

Edmundoa 'Alvim Siedel' we are
only talking about variegated forms
of the species Edmundoa lindenii var.
lindenii – which of course is the white

flowered (primary bract) form. There is

no formal record or even a photograph
of a variegated Edmundoa lindenii
var. rosea – the rose-pink flowered

form. Such a plant was reported to
be growing in Florida, but I have not
managed to track anything down to
date. If you have any information re
this, please do share!

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – June 2014 issue

CONTENTS
'Special Species Spotlight' – Graeme Barclay 2
President's Page – Graeme Barclay 5
Bromeliad Society May meeting news – Dave Anderson 6
Library Corner – Noelene Ritson 8
Precautions when acquiring a new plant – Neville Wood 9
Broms by the Basin – Erin Titmus 12
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 15
Group News 16
Learning about the genera: Graeme Barclay on Edmundoa 18

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 16 for details of group meeting

times and venues.

JUNE
24th Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
The Monthly Choice competition:
Albomarginated neoregelias. There will
be a plant auction followed by our mid

year supper. (Please bring a plate!)

29th Northland Group meeting

JULY

6th South Auckland Group meeting
9th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
13th Tillandsia Group meeting
22nd Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
The Monthly Choice competition:
Aechmea orlandiana and hybrids. We
will have a session of 'taking off pups'.
To participate please bring along the
implements you use for removing pups.
We will also watch a PowerPoint of San
Diego gardens.

FRONT COVER: A stunning Edmundoa lindenii var. rosea group that is yet to

show its lovely daisy-shaped, rose coloured inflorescences. This wonderful planting

is in McGregor Smith's Matapouri garden in Northland. Read the article on the
interesting Edmundoa genus, starting on page 18. (Photo and notes by Graeme
Barclay).

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Winter on the way

'Jack Frost' has finally made an
appearance and all those warm-
loving broms are now starting to
feel his chill. There has been some
very nasty, low temperature nights –
some of the coldest in May on record
in many areas, at minus 5!! I hope
you were well prepared and your
plants haven't suffered too much.

I find it's worthwhile rearranging

things a little in autumn and early
winter, protecting your special
plants to hopefully minimise that
cold damage leaf spotting and dieback.
It's such a shame when one
night of frost, severe wind or hail
can ruin prize broms, so don't delay
any longer if you've put this job off!

Recently, I got the tools out and put
up some more hanging wires and two
large high level shelves in my plastic
house to get those plants that need the
warmth and increased light positioned
higher up. It's amazing how such a
small heater on a timer can increase
the temperature in your greenhouse a
few degrees if it's well sealed, another
thing to consider on those very cold
nights.

Our June monthly meeting

I hope our Auckland region members
are all thinking of braving the cold and
coming along to our June meeting to
partake in the mid-winter auction and
supper. We will have the rare plant
auction, plant competitions and plants

sales first, followed by the extended

supper so you can leave at your leisure
afterwards. Apologies on behalf of
the committee for the late change
in schedule here, we had a wee mix-
up and our programme for the rest
of the year means we really needed
to change it. So will look forward
to seeing you there with a plate of
goodies for supper and your dollars for
some spirited bidding! Remember our

Society benefits on every auction sale

to help fund our wonderful Journal.

Thank you to those members who
brought plants along for the Silent
Auction table at the May meeting.

I think three of the five plants tabled

sold which was encouraging, so if
you have a plant you'd like to Silent
Auction this month, bring it along and
put a reserve price on it if you wish.

Cheers,

Graeme Barclay

Please note – our mid-winter supper will be held at the
conclusion of our JUNE meeting.

Due to a bit of a 'mix-up' we had not advised members of this in our
May Journal as we normally would. Apologies for the short notice.

It's definitely on and we'd like members to please bring a plate so

we can all enjoy some early winter cheer. The San Diego gardensPowerPoint advertised for June will now be shown at our July meeting.

Bromeliad Society May Meeting News

– Notes and photos by Dave Anderson
President Graeme chaired the
meeting and welcomed everyone.
It was very pleasing to see so
many members attending on such a
cold night. Demonstrating an excellent
means of displaying hanging baskets
of bromeliads Hawi Winter had built a
cane structure in the hall tonight – many
thanks. For those members wanting
to sell plants in the 'Silent Auction' on
meeting nights you are now allowed to
put a reserve price on the plant. We have
our annual rare plant auction in June so
please contact Peter Waters if you have
plants to sell.

In June we are having the mid-winter
supper – so please bring a plate. Lynette
Nash and Isla McGowan have been
working on the bromeliad glade at Eden
Gardens from 9.00am to noon on the 1st
Friday of every month and that has been
much appreciated by the management of
the gardens. If any members could give
them a hand on the Friday mornings
please contact Isla, Lynette or a
committee member.

Peter Waters took us through the 'Show
and Tell' plants. First up for display were
two different varieties of Guzmania
sanguinea. The first was the winner from
last month namely Guzmania sanguinea
var. sanguinea – a moderately large plant
that can be up to 60cm in diameter; the
second plant was the variety Guzmania
'Tricolor' that had lost its variegations.
Guzmania 'Tricolor' is a variety of
Guzmania sanguinea var. sanguinea.
The owner of this plant had thought
that it was Guzmania sanguinea var.
brevipedicellata, however this latter
species is smaller and has bright brick

red leaves when in flower but without

any yellow to them. Next and also for
display was another species – Aechmea
gigantea, which as the name suggests is a
plant with robust leaves that are 130mm

wide and 500mm long. The flower spike

looks similar to an Aechmea fasciata
spike but does not emerge above the
leaves. The Neoregelia 'Sweet Nellie'
#10 was brought in with the owner asking

the significance of the #10 in the name.

Peter said that the hybrid was Neoregelia

cv. of cyanea x 'Petite' and was made by
A. Freeman in Australia. Many seedlings
were raised from the seeds of one pod
and given the name 'Sweet Nellie' with
the number differentiating between
the various seeds that had been grown
on. As the PowerPoint presentation
tonight was on the genus Alcantarea a
pot of Alcantarea farneyi in flower was
brought in for display. It is the smallest
species in the genus with those typically
very large alcantarea flowers. The spike

off a Portea petropolitana was brought

in for identification along with the spike

from a xPortemea 'Luis Ariza Julia' –
both plants having been in NZ for many
years.

We then had the PowerPoint presentation
of Elton Leme's talk on Alcantarea from
the 'Cool Broms' conference held in
Auckland in February last year.

John Muddiman won this month's

special raffle prize. The door prizes went

to Diana McPherson, Andrew Maloy and
Diane Timmins.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First Graeme Barclay
with Aechmea alopecurus – a most

attractive plant with a lovely coloured

inflorescence some 70cm high. This

plant was also voted plant of the month.
Peter Coyle was second with Aechmea
'Seneca'. Also in the competition were
Aechmea weilbachii var. leodiensis;
Nidularium innocentii var. striatum,
rutilans and Vriesea ospinae var gruberi.

Open Foliage: Peter Coyle was first

with a Vriesea 'Galaxy' – the beautiful
variegated form of the species Vriesea
glutinosa. Second was Nancy Murphy
with Vriesea 'Dark Knight'. In the
competition were Neoregelia 'Burnsie's
Spiral'; Quesnelia 'Tim Plowman';
Vriesea ospinae var gruberi, 'Exotica
Sosume', 'Jewel' hybrid and 'Snows of
Mauna Kea'.

Tillandsia: David Anderson was first

with Tillandsia ponderosa – always a

most attractive plant when in flower.

Second with Tillandsia erubescens var
erubescens was Lynette Nash. Other
plants on the table were Tillandsia
argentina, caerulea, capitata 'Marron',
crocata, flavobracteata, guatemalensis,
erubescens, stricta, roezlii and
fasciculata.
Neoregelia: First Peter Coyle with
Neoregelia 'Totara Dangerman' with
its deep purple shiny leaves and second
was Peter Waters with Neoregelia 'Cane
Fire' x 'Giant'. Also in the competition
were Neoregelia 'Bobbie Hull' x
'Silver', 'Exotica Velvet', 'Exotica
Velvet', 'First Prize', 'Jewellery Shop,
'Lynx' x 'Aussie Dream', 'Milagro',
'Outrageous', 'Painted Delight' and
'Tiger Cub' x 'Kilauea Fire'.

Named Monthly Plant (Hanging
Baskets): First equal were Graeme
Barclay with xCanmea(Aechmeacorreiaaraujoi x Canistrum seidelianum) and
Peter Coyle with Neoregelia 'Groucho'.

Aechmea alopecurus (Graeme Barclay)
First in open flowering section andoverall 'Plant of the Month'
Vriesea 'Galaxy' (Peter Coyle)
First in open foliage section
Cont'd P8

Cont'd from P7 – June Meeting News

Tillandsia ponderosa (David Anderson)
First in tillandsia section
Neoregelia 'Dangerman' (Peter Coyle)
First in neoregelia section
In the competition were Neoregelia
'Blushing Tiger', 'Fairy Paint', 'Flaming
Lovely', 'Grace's Avalanche', 'Night
Spot', 'Punctate', 'Tara Mite'; Tillandsia
brachycaulos and Vriesea scalaris. The
Plant of the Month went to Graeme
Barclay with Aechmea alopecurus.
Congratulations to all the winners.

Next Meeting: Tuesday 24th June.

with Noelene Ritson

Everyone is welcome!

Hi everyone,

And a special 'Hi' to new members who have joined our Society recently. I have met
lots of new members over the past months at our 'Library Corner' – some wanting
books for beginner growers and others who have actually been growing bromeliads

for some time and are just wanting to increase their knowledge and get to find out

about new plants to put on their 'wish lists'. Then there are others who just drop by
for a short chat – great!

If you are a newer member and haven't had a look at our library books please feel
welcome to come and browse at our monthly meetings. Members are able to take
out two books per month – returnable the following month. When you have been a
member for one year you are also able to take out books from our reference section.
Just remember to bring them back!

I hope to see you at 'Library Corner' soon.

Noelene

Precautions to observe when
acquiring a new plant

Adapted from an article by Neville Wood, Illawarra Bromeliad Society, Inc.
(writing in their 'Newslink'). For New Zealand we have omitted references to
some obviously 'Australian things' like special transportation requirements for
plants from tropical areas such as Far North Queensland.

These notes are written mainly for
the new grower. When acquiring
a new plant by whatever
means, the underlying aim is to never
compromise the integrity of the plants
you already have by introducing some
type of disease or insect pest into
your collection. To avoid this, where
possible it's necessary to carefully
inspect all proposed new purchases
carefully to identify any problems.
This is easily said, but for the new
grower who has no prior experience
and doesn't necessarily know what
to look for, it can be a daunting task.
These notes are based on my own
experience of treating new plants.

Initial inspection

When a plant is offered for sale it
should look at its best; if it looks
untidy, has dirty leaves which are

broken or cracked, dead flowers, or

is in a dirty pot with the level of the
potting mix lower than it should be,
treat it with suspicion as this plant is
suffering all of the classic signs of
neglect. With the initial inspection of

a plant, don't just look at the flowers

or the coloured markings on the leaves
which may be what attracted you to

it in the first place. Look past these

things: look under the leaves as this
is an area where insect pests are often

found. There should be no remnants of
dead leaf growth around the base of
the plant as this is a hiding place for
various types of scale insects as well as
mealybug and should have previously
been removed.

When buying direct from a grower or
Bromeliad Society members you are
usually secure in the knowledge that
most growers will give you sound
advice and replace a plant if found to
have a problem. However, some general
nurseries, garden centres and 'big box'
homeware stores and they are rarely
the growers, but are just 'on sellers'.
Often the person doing the selling has

very little (if any) knowledge about

the cultural requirements of the plants.
The plants may have been neglected
and left sitting inside on a shelf, or
outside sometimes in unprotected full
sun waiting to be sold. Sometimes they
are in this situation for many weeks and
often without water. This can stress a
plant and affect its health. Often plants
are unnamed or occasionally will have
a 'generic' name tag informing you
that the plant is a bromeliad with some
basic cultural information on the back

of the label in a 'one fits all' – which

we know is wrong as various genera
of bromeliads have different cultural
requirements.

Cont'd P10

Cont'd from P9 – Precautions to observe when acquiring a new plant

So, be critical, be a 'nit-picker' and
look for any possible problems.
Generally the plant should look clean

with strong leaves and be firm in the

pot. Beware if the leaves are droopy,
yellowing or have dead tips as these
are all signs of possible problems. If
the central leaves are yellowing this
could indicate that the plant has crown
rot and if you smell the centre of the
plant you will know immediately as
the smell of crown rot is terrible!

Feel the weight of the plant and pot; if
it feels abnormally heavy it's possible
the mix is poorly drained and is waterlogged:
if it appears unusually light,
it may have been starved of water for
a considerable time and in the early
stages of dehydration. Bits of dead
leaves around the base of the plant
demonstrate that the grower of the
plant wasn't too fussy about plant
hygiene and indicate the possibility of
other hidden problems. It's simple – if
you are in any doubt about the plant's
condition then don't buy.

What to do with a new plant when
you bring it home

Bromeliads are rarely troubled with
serious diseases or insect pests,
however, once you have bought,
swapped or been given a new plant as a
gift, it's a good idea to keep it separate
from other plants in your collection. In
other words, quarantine it just in case it
may have some type of disease which
isn't yet obvious.

Some growers can't be bothered to take
the precaution of quarantining a new
plant and just take a chance and add it
immediately to their collection. Others
will quarantine a plant and adopt the
'watch and wait' method to see if
any problems develop and then treat
accordingly. Personally, I like to take
the preventative route, and although
I don't advocate spraying poisonous
substances over whole collections on
a regular basis like some growers do,
I have no problem treating individual
plants with a fungicide or systemic
insecticide if there is evidence to
suggest the plant requires it.

You are only able to 'half examine' any
plant at the point of purchase because
to examine a plant thoroughly you
must knock it out of the pot to look at
the roots just as closely as the foliage.
I call this the secondary examination.

Once the plant is removed from the
pot, look at the state of the potting mix.
Is it excessively wet or dry? Brown
leaf tips often mean not enough water
while yellow leaf tips mean too much
water. Examine the roots and remove
any that are dead.

Next, look for evidence of insects or
other creatures that may cause problems

– e.g., worms may block the drainage
holes with their droppings as they
break down the potting mix, but this
is mainly apparent when the pots have
been sitting directly on damp ground.
By simply repotting the plant and
relocating it to a position up off the
ground you can rectify this problem.

The main problem to look for around the
roots is 'Root mealybug'. This insect
does its damage unnoticed beneath the
surface and is similar in appearance
to the mealybug we occasionally see,
usually covered in a white woolly
substance. It likes dry conditions and
is sometimes seen when we remove
remnants of dead, dry growth from the
base of a plant. Root mealybug may
attack any roots but prefer the dryer
areas of the mix just below the level
of the soil, especially where root and
stem meet. Although they can occur
throughout the whole root system,
they are most obvious around the
edges, and sometimes appear on the
inside walls of the pot. Evidence of

their presence is often seen as a fine

white coloured web on the inside of the
pot. Root mealybugs are sap-sucking
insects, and they weaken the plant by
sucking the sap while working beneath
the surface of the mix.

Precautionary treatment

All my new plants get the same
precautionary treatment because, even
with no evidence of any insects, there
can be eggs which need to be dealt with.
I remove as much of the old potting
mix as possible and thoroughly hose
off any remaining mix not adhering
to the roots. I then mix up a reliable
systemic insecticide in a container
large enough to accommodate the
whole plant and completely immerse
the total plant for at least half an hour
and until air bubbles can no longer be
seen rising to the surface. I then hang
the plant upside down and allow it to

air dry after which it's re-potted in my
own fresh, damp potting mix.

The plant is then moved to a semi-
shaded area where it is thoroughly
watered the next day. It will remain
there for a week, after which the light
level is gradually increased over a
period of a month. Even though leaf
colour is a good indicator of what light
levels the plant was previously exposed

to (with light green leaves suggesting

high light and very dark green leaves

suggesting low light), it's far better to

be on the safe side. Never put a newly
introduced plant in direct sun.

Seasonal considerations

(notes added for NZ)

It's generally not such a good idea to
buy plants from outside your immediate
area during the winter months

because any significant differences

in temperature between areas can
easily stress the plants, and it will take
possibly twelve months for them to
become acclimatised. Generally it's
better to purchase in summer when
any temperature differences will not be
great and plants are actively growing.

Finally, if you don't think your new
plant is performing to expectations,
seek advice from other experienced
growers, who will be only too willing
to help.

Broms by the Basin –
an acre of beauty at Kerikeri

– Article and photos by Erin Titmus
The lovely garden of Alistair and
Bevlyn Bibby overlooks the
moorings at Waipapa Landing,
Kerikeri and has been a regular host to
the Far North Bromeliad Group over
recent years.

'Our aim is for year round colour and
a variety of textures which are also

suitable for Bevlyn's floral art,' says

Alistair. They have achieved this by
planting an eclectic mix of old and
new: cottage and subtropical planting
themes in several separate garden
rooms around their waterside one acre.
They spied the property on a visit to
Kerikeri in 1996 and it became their
holiday home where plants had to
survive in the natural elements. By
2005 Bevlyn and Alistair had come to
live permanently in Kerikeri, the house
had been extended and the surrounding
garden landscaped to complete the
make-over. Now the plants had onsite
care and Bevlyn noted that the mature
trees they had kept and the volcanic
rock walls would provide ideal shelter
and heat for bromeliads. The property
may get several frosts a year, 'which

surprised us when we first shifted to

the winterless north,' they say.

'...an eclectic mix of old and new:
cottage and subtropical planting
themes in several separate
garden rooms...'

The maturity of bromeliads in the trees

is a strong feature of the garden, as is
the enclosed courtyard between the
house and the cottage. Here subtropical
trees such as brugmansia and iochroma

mix with evergreen schefflera, pungas

and vireyas to provide a microclimate
for large vrieseas planted in the
border. They are supplemented with
hidden pots to create intense planting.

Bevlyn's artistic flare can be seen in

every corner of the property where
planting combination and the use of
focal items create scenes that stop the
visitor in appreciation.

Alistair has developed the banks on
the Queen's chain and expanded his
use of broms there when given a range
of quality pups a couple of years ago.
To stand below the bank and look up at
the leafscape as the sun shines through
is to see a glowing tapestry of colour!

Both work together in maintaining
the highly productive kitchen garden
to the back of their home where a
shade house also caters for special
bromeliads, Bevlyn's favourite mini
neos in hanging baskets and other
plants needing a little more protection.
A small conservatory, viewed only
from indoors, also provides perfect
conditions for shade-loving broms.

With such a variety in the garden
to catch a visitor's attention their
hospitality to local groups, and others,
will continue to delight.

Broms by the Basin –
an acre of beauty at Kerikeri...
More photos on P14 13

Broms by the Basin –
an acre of beauty at Kerikeri...

Alistair surveys his bank ofplants from the Queen's chain
14
In the
shade
house with
Alcantarea
nahoumii
the feature
plant

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters

Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451
David Cowie 09-630 8220
Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Sandy Stonham 09-627 9658
Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first

Tuesday of publication month

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Regular Writers

Andrew Devonshire
Graeme Barclay
John and Agatha Lambert
Alan J. Thomson

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
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Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

'Buy & Swap'

Listings in 'Buy & Swap' are FREE for

members of the Society (max. 30 words).

For advertising enquiries and material, please

contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366

or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Group News

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Lynley Breeze
Lynley welcomed 58 members and
visitors to the meeting. We were pleased
to welcome the Coromandel group for
a visit on Sunday 13th April, when they
visited six local gardens. We still require
someone to take over Jo Elder's role as
secretary.

Our guest speaker, Rob Smith, spoke
about hydroponics. For most plants more
than 75% of nutrition comes from the sun
and air via photosynthesis. The balance

of nutrients is via the root system. (This

is even more pronounced in the case of
bromeliads and especially tillandsias,
because as epiphytes their root systems

are minimal.)

Hydroponics means growing plants with
their roots suspended in water. A targeted
nutrient solution for plant types has led
to massive productivity gains, and has
meant that we now have fancy lettuces,
tomatoes and salad veges year round. This
was unknown until the introduction of
hydroponics to NZ in the mid seventies.

Competition results:

Plant of the month: Best albomarginated
bromeliad: 1st Natalie & Brian Simmonds
with Neoregelia 'Van Dourme' 2nd Gill
Keesing with Neoregelia 'Annick'
3rd equal, Colin Sutherland, Aechmea
coelestis var albomarginata and Gill
Keesing Neoregelia 'Hot Gossip'.
'Show and Tell': Neoregelia 'Orange
Crush', a neoregelia requiring a name
and a query as to whether a plant was an
aechmea or a neoregelia.
Novice section: 1st Diana Fiford with

Billbergia 'Karamea Vesuvius'

Open Competition: 1st Colin Sutherland

with an unknown neoregelia,
2nd Graeme Alabaster with Neoregelia
'Aussie Dream', 3rd Jo Elder – Vriesea

'Vistarella'

Tillandsia Competition: 1st Jo Elder
with Tillandsia tectorum (bush form),
2nd Audrey Hewson – Tillandsia caput-
medusae x capitata, 3rd Audrey Hewson

– Tillandsia stricta (green form)
There were seven lucky raffle winners.
Next Meeting: July 9th at 12.30pm at the
Yacht Club. Speaker Peter Waters – topic

to be confirmed. Plant of the month is

Nidularium.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
Our meeting on 1st June was held in the
Friends House at the Auckland Botanic
Gardens. It was a beautiful sunny day and
parking was at a premium.

Marie Healey welcomed everyone
including new members and guests
and reminded members that annual
subscriptions are now due. Our guest
speaker was Margaret Flanagan on the
subject of palms. Margaret gave a very
informative and amusing PowerPoint
presentation on the different kinds
of palms and explained the kinds of
conditions under which they grow. All
of the palms shown in the presentation
are actually in Margaret and Robert's
beautiful garden at Drury. She also
brought along some seedlings which
were offered to anyone who wanted them,

together with a palm which was raffled

and won by Roy Morton. The monthly

raffle of plants was won by Regina Wai

and Gene Dillman.

Next Meeting: Sunday, 6th July, at the
Auckland Botanic Gardens commencing
at 1:30pm in the Plastic House. Robert
Flanagan will give a presentation on
tillandsias.

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Sandra Wheeler
No formal meeting this month – instead

we had a trip to Auckland. Our first

destination was Di Pinkerton's Garden

Centre in Henderson Valley Road. This

is an immaculate garden centre with not
a leaf out of place and the stock was in
superb condition. Di said it is vacuumed
3 times a week! She also has a great
assortment of objets d'art and plant
species not seen before.

We had lunch next door at the Pukeko
Cafe. This was very interesting being
a complex of buildings consisting of a
restaurant, second hand precious goods,
early childhood centre and an animal
farm. A real 'westie band' was playing in
the background which was very pleasant.
Peacocks and a sheep dog were among
those scavenging for food scraps.

Next stop was the large Cornerlea Gardens
at Whenuapai where, under cover in a
large greenhouse, we found a selection
of Andrew Maloy's bromeliads and other

plants the owners had propagated. A final

stop at the Plant Barn, Silverdale and the

bus was full to overflowing with plants!

Next Meeting: Sunday 29th June at
Reyburn House. (Note – this is one
week later than usual). Matt Hennessy
will show DVDs from the 'Cool Broms'

Conference on Brazilian bromeliads. The
competition plant for June is Neoregelia

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
Orchid Group – Alison Iremonger

Our group met on the beach at Waiotahi
for lunch on a cool sunny May morning.
After lunch we set out along the beach to
collect pieces of driftwood. From there
we travelled to the home of Allan and
Barbara Rogers. It is always a pleasure
to wander around and see what they have
been doing. Our meeting took place here
and Sue welcomed 28 members. A trip to
Auckland in October was discussed, as
well as the 'Bromsmatta' Conference in
Australia next year. We then had 'Show
and Tell'. Barbara showed us plants to
pop in spare spaces around the garden.
There were cuttings for members to take
home. Sue had a pile of old bromeliad

magazines to give away. Raffles, sales

table and afternoon tea followed.

Competition results

Flowering Bromeliad: 1th Vriesea ospinae

– Gail Fergusson; 2nd Vriesea philippocoburgii – Ross Fergusson; 3rd Tillandsia
standleyi – Gail Fergusson
Non Flowering Bromeliad: 1st Neoregelia
'Stripey' – Ross Fergusson; 2nd Neoregelia
'Jewellery Shop' – Ross Fergusson.
Next Meeting: 15th June at Matata
Community Hall. Guest speakers will be
Dave and Joan Anderson from Auckland

talking about tillandsias. Visitors are

always welcome to our meeting. Contacts

– Maureen Moffat 07 322 2276; Ross
Fergusson 07 312 5487; Sue Laurent 07
307 1323.
Tillandsia Group – Lester Ching

Next Meeting: Sunday July 13th at
1pm at Dave Dawson's, 71 Millen Ave,
Pakuranga. Discussion ionantha. Please
bring some from your collection!

Learning about the genera : Edmundoa
Article by Graeme Barclay

Edmundoa is a small, ornamental
genus of the sub-family
Bromelioideae and includes
only three species. It is endemic
solely to the Atlantic forest of Brazil
and one of the more recent genera
to be elevated to genus status. The
most commonly cultivated member,
Edmundoa lindenii, was formerly part
of the genus Canistrum, but in the
1990s, Brazilian bromeliad authority
Elton Leme studied it in depth and
concluded it was different in a number
of ways to the other members of the
Canistrum genus.

Around the same time, he also studied
and described two other species as
Edmundoa ambigua and Edmundoa
perplexa, which shared similar
characteristics to Edmundoa lindenii.
Their descriptions were published
in his 1997 book, 'Canistrum,
Bromeliads of the Atlantic Forest',
where he proposed the creation of
the genus Edmundoa in honour
of pioneering Brazilian botanist,

Edmundo Pereira (1914-1986), who

discovered and described many
other Brazilian bromeliad species.

One of the differentiating
morphological features of edmundoas
is that they all have densely lanate

inflorescence components, meaning
many of the floral parts such as the
scape, sepals and flower fascicles are

covered in something resembling wool

– whereas other Canistrum species do
not. Also, members of Canistrum are
essentially all vase shaped, smallish
plants, while the growth habit of
edmundoas form a much larger, flatter

rosette with wider leaves. It was
therefore considered that Edmundoa is
somewhat of an intermediate between
Canistrum/Aechmea on one hand and
Nidularium on the other, thus deserving
of its own place as a recognised genus.

All three Edmundoa species are
normally found growing epiphytically
on the lower half of tree trunks
in coastal regions of the South-
Eastern Atlantic forest at elevations
around 400 metres and below.
Edmundoa lindenii is also found
growing terrestrially, and sometimes

saxicolously (over rocks). They prefer

shady, sheltered areas and will thrive
in both warm and colder conditions.

As this genus is a small one, let's take a
closer look at all of the species involved.

Edmundoa lindenii var. lindenii was

first collected in 1879 and described

as Canistrum lindenii in 1891.
The leaves are green with darker
green mottled spots and very small,
irregularly spaced spines. It grows
to well over 75cm in diameter in a

broad, funnel-form rosette that flattens
considerably when flowering occurs.

The inflorescence has creamy-white
to green-tinged floral bracts, forming

a basket shape similar to canistrums.
One peculiar feature of this plant is

that normally the flower scape (stalk)
is very short, holding the inflorescence

just above the primary bracts and leaf
rosette, while at other times it can be
elongated up to 30cm, thus holding the

inflorescence well above the plant. It

has been noted by some growers that
this 'elongation' often occurs only after
very heavy rain, but when drier, it is
more low set. Edmundoa lindenii var.
lindenii has been here in New Zealand
since the early days of the BSNZ, but
possibly more commonly cultivated
now are the medio-picta variegated
and albomarginated cultivars, now
registered as Edmundoa 'Alvim Siedel'

(see pages 2 and 3 of this Journal).

Edmundoa lindenii var. rosea was
also initially collected in the late 1870s
and previously most commonly known
as Canistrum lindenii var. roseum.
It is simply a recognised variation of
Edmundoa lindenii var. lindenii due
to the different rose-pink colour of

the floral bracts – hence the name var.
(variety) rosea. Another difference
is the leaves often take on a bronzy,
reddish hue, particularly in stronger

light and they can also have fine red

striated lines, mainly on the underside
of the leaf sheaths.
There is a form known as Edmundoa
lindenii 'Bronze' in circulation that

has a distinct bronze/pink flush to

the leaves, though it is not fully clear
whether this is ONLY a rose-coloured

flowering plant, or in fact also occurs
in the white flower form. If anyone has
a 'Bronze' plant with a white flower,

please let me know. A variegated or
albomarginated form of Edmundoa
lindenii var. rosea, is also reputed to
exist, though this has only been seen
in Florida and is not known to have
ever been in New Zealand or Australia.

Edmundoa ambigua was first
discovered in 1973, classified as

Nidularium ambiguum in the late
1980s, but properly described by

Edmundoa lindenii var. lindenii
PhOtO e. LeMe
Edmundoa lindenii var. rosea
PhOtO K. tAte
Cont'd P20 19

Cont'd from P19 – Learning about the gener

Edmundoa ambigua

PhOtO K. tAte

Edmundoa perplexa

PhOtO O. RIBeIRO

20

Cont'd from P19 – Learning about the genera

Edmundoa ambigua
PhOtO K. tAte
Edmundoa perplexa
PhOtO O. RIBeIRO
Leme in 1997 and published as a
member of Edmundoa. It also has
green, slightly mottled leaves but
is smaller than Edmundoa lindenii,
only growing to around 60-70cm

diameter. The inflorescence scape is

normally always elongated and the

floral bracts are rose-pink coloured

and covered in scurfy indument

(a covering of fine hair or scales).

Edmundoa perplexa was first

collected in 1934, described as
Canistrum perplexum in 1935, but
again re-classified to Edmundoa in
1997. It is very similar in many ways
to Edmundoa ambigua, except the

diameter of the inflorescence is slightly

larger and the primary bracts and
leaf blades are much more serrated.
Both of these lesser-known species
are possibly not currently in New
Zealand. Again, if you are growing
either of them, please let me know.

Cultivation Tips

All forms of Edmundoa are excellent
plants to grow in New Zealand as
feature plants in either deep or light
shade locations. They will form nice
clumps if pups are left on them to
develop, but look equally good if
spaced apart in group plantings - as per
the cover photo of this Journal. One
drawback is the snails seem to often
enjoy eating the lower leaves, so using
slug bait around them is a good idea.
Like many nidulariums they are cold-
hardy and respond well to fertiliser
to attain a larger size. They seem to
also grow best when kept quite moist,
otherwise leaf marking and browning
off can occur if they become too dry.

 July 2014VOL 54 NO 7
Eden Garden in Auckland
Photo: Murray Mathieson
• Eden Garden... beautiful in winter • Learning about the genus Wittrockia• Hamilton's Botanic Gardens

At the June meeting...

Three winners from the Society's June meeting...

Neoregelia 'Milagro' (David Goss).
First in Monthly Choice – Albo-marginated
plants. PhOTO by GrAEME bArCLAy
Neoregelia 'Golden Pheasant' (Andrew
Devonshire). First in neoregelia section.
PhOTO by GrAEME bArCLAy
Vriesea 'Kiwi Lavender'.
PhOTO by GrAEME bArCLAy
And a stunner from the
plant auction...
Tillandsia argentina (Lynette Nash).
First in tillandsia section.
PhOTO by DAVE ANDErSON

Bromeliad Society June Meeting News

– Notes by Dave Anderson
President Graeme chaired the
meeting and welcomed everyone
including two visitors – Maggie
from Hong Kong and Gaye from
Australia. Graeme then went over the
programme for the next two months.
He went on to say that one of our
members is going to Ecuador soon
and has offered to bring back books by
the author José Manzanares. José has
written several books on bromeliads
in Ecuador and was a speaker at our
'Cool Broms' conference in Auckland
last year. Graeme has made some notes
about purchasing these books in his
'President's Page' in this Journal.

Peter Waters took us through the
'Show and Tell' plants. First up was
a wrongly named plant with the label
Tillandsia ionantha. It was much larger
than any of the T. ionantha species but
because of its shape it could possibly
have ionantha in its parentage – it

could not be identified further. Next

another plant wrongly labelled as T.
stricta. It was thought that it might be
Tillandsia didisticha x stricta as it had
a T. didisticha-like flower spike with
compound white flowers. Another

member purchased seed at the BSI
conference in 2006 that was supposed
to be Neoregelia concentrica. A fully
grown plant from this seed that is now

in flower was brought in and identified

as probably the species Nidularium
rutilans that has red flowers. Lastly

there were two plants labelled

Guzmania lindenii. The first one had

been bought at our conference last year
and had the classic appearance of the

species as labelled. It had originally

come from the Tropiflora nursery in

Florida. The second plant was a pup
from a plant that had been grown by

the late Laurie Dephoff. The colours

of the leaves on this plant were light
green with darker green banding that
is completely different to Guzmania
lindenii above. This second plant was
thought to be Guzmania bismarkii

After the 'Show and Tell' we had a
break to view the rare and special
plants that were to be auctioned. Peter
Coyle was our auctioneer for this
annual event and what a great job he
did.

Diane Timmins won this month's
special raffle prize. The door prizes
went to Jennifer McGreal, Diana Holt
and Thomas Leeming.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First Peter Coyle
with Billbergia 'Caramba' – another

most attractive plant made by Don

Beadle. This plant was also voted plant
of the month. Peter was also second with
Neoregelia pendula x eleutheropetala
(registered as 'Pink Spider') – a plant

that featured on the BSNZ journal front

cover back in September 2004. Also in
the competition were Billbergia 'Cold
Fusion'; Neoregelia coriacea; Vriesea
incurvata hybrid and 'Elysian'.

Open Foliage: David Goss was first

with a Vriesea 'Tasman' hybrid. Second
was Peter Coyle with Orthophytum

Cont'd P4

Cont'd from P3 – Bromeliad Society Meeting News

vagans (albomarginated). In the
competition were Vriesea 'Cosmic
Jewel', 'Twilight' and 'Volcano'.

Tillandsia: Lynette Nash was first with

Tillandsia argentina – a clump of this
small species with 20 plus plants in

flower. Lynette was also second with

Tillandsia chiapensis. Other plants
on the table were Tillandsia gardneri,
recurvata var subsecundifolia and
'Pink Cascade'.

Neoregelia: First Andrew Devonshire

with Neoregelia 'Golden Pheasant'
hybrid and second was Peter Coyle
with Neoregelia 'Wild Rabbit'. Also
in the competition were Neoregelia

'Break of Day' x 'Blushing Tiger',
'Grace's Babe' x 'Chiquita Linda',

Mark your diary now...
'Pink Vulcan', 'Perfection' x tristis,
'Perfection' x 'Fools Gold', 'Pheasant'
x lilliputiana, 'Treasure Chest' and
'Yin'.

Named Monthly Plant (Albomarginated bromeliads): First

was David Goss with a Neoregelia

'Milagro'. Second equal were Peter
Coyle with Neoregelia 'Pink Vulcan'
and John Muddiman with Neoregelia
'Rafael'. In the competition were
Neoregelia carolinae hybrid x 'Exotica
Misty Pink', 'Garnish' and 'Milagro'.

The Plant of the Month went to Peter
Coyle with Billbergia 'Caramba'.
Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING: Tues 22nd July.

Open Day
Sunday 12th October from 10am

• Andrew and Rhonda Maloy invite all Bromeliad Society
members and associated groups to visit their nursery in
Whenuapai, Auckland.
• A wide range of quality plants for sale.
Watch the Journal for more details.
16 RiveRlea Road, Whenuapai auckland

Ph (09) 416 3543

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – July 2014 issue

CONTENTS
Bromeliad Society June meeting news – Dave Anderson 2
Hamilton's stunning themed gardens – Alan J. Thomson 6
Aechmea ornata nationalis in flower – East London (S.A.) 8
President's Page – Graeme Barclay 9
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 10
'Special Species Spotlight' – Graeme Barclay 11
Learning about the genera: Chris Paterson on Wittrockia 14
Group News 16
Eden Garden... beautiful in winter – Murray Mathieson 18

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and

do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 16 for details of group meeting

times and venues.

JULY
20th Eastern Bay of Plenty Group
meeting
22nd Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.

The Monthly Choice competition:

Aechmea orlandiana and hybrids. We
will have a session of 'taking off pups'.
To participate please bring along the
implements you use for removing pups.
We will also watch a PowerPoint of San

Diego gardens.
27th Northland Group meeting

AUGUST

3rd South Auckland Group meeting
13th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
26th Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden and
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The

Monthly Choice competition: Neoregelia

'Wild Tiger'. Peter Waters will talk on
aechmeas.

FRONT COVER: Eden Garden in the heart of Auckland in mid winter is beautiful
and well worth a visit. Read about our Society's involvement with Eden Garden and

how members can help in the 'Bromeliad Glade' in the article starting on page 18.

(Article and photos by Murray Mathieson)

Hamilton's stunning themed gardens

– Article and photos by Alan J. Thomson
Hamilton Botanical Gardens are a
revelation! By stealth over the last
ten years they have been working
away creating a stunning series of

themed gardens. Now, in 2014 they

have brought together, what is quite
possibly, one of the world's great
garden design projects and, in my

opinion, the best that New Zealand has

to offer.

Established gardens are the Chinese
Scholars garden, English herbaceous

borders flower garden, Japanese

Garden of Contemplation, American
Modernist garden, Italian Renaissance
garden, Indian Char Bagh and
Chinoiserie gardens.

Added in the last year or two are
the Kitchen Sustainable Backyard
garden, the Herb and Te Parapara
Maori gardens.

New for 2014 are the Surrealist, Tudor,

Concept, Medieval, Picturesque
and Baroque gardens together with

the Mansfield Garden recreating the
famous fictional garden in Katherine
Mansfield's short story, 'The Garden

Party.'

You go round a corner and meet
Alice and the Mad Hatter in
bronze and are presented with a
selection of closed doors round
a circular courtyard. Open a blue
door and it draws you into the new
Tropical Garden with hundreds of
bromeliads and other sub-tropical
plantings.

For centuries gardeners in temperate
climates have tried to recreate the
luxuriant beauty, colour and
fantasy of tropical gardens. While
glasshouses have been used to
create this effect since the mid 19th
century, tropical gardens have also
been created outdoors using hardy
tropical looking or sub-tropical plants.
Aucklanders have long enjoyed being
able to grow and develop such gardens
but now it's Hamilton's turn!

The Tropical Garden

The Tropical Garden provides
horticultural interest with orchids from
Australia, bamboos from Asia
and aloes from Africa. Roughly
200 species feature in the garden,

with more than 8,000 individual

specimens planted. A vertical garden
wall with more than 6,000 'pockets'
housing individual plants is set above
a pool, which is a key feature of
the garden.Mass plantings of Aechmea
recurvata, vrieseas and bilbergias

looking like a fireworks display are

covering a sloping gulley that goes down
to a stream. I particularly liked seeing

lots of subtropical nerine bulbs flowers

side by side with huge vrieseas and
swathes of Aechmea fasciata.

This amazing garden was completed
earlier this year and has yet to get

through its first Hamilton winter.
Large numbers of banana and iresine

plants look particularly vulnerable
to frosts so time will tell how the
sheltered gully will protect the plants

Hamilton's Botanical Gardens...
in the depths of a cold winter.

I was speaking with Amanda Graham,

Business Development Manager at the

gardens and she was telling me how
they have raised up the beds with
thick mulch and a spraying system
to counter the worst effects of a
frost.

Make sure you visit the gardens and
prepare to be 'blown away.'

Check out the website at http://www.

hamiltongardens.co.nz

More photos on P8

Hamilton's Botanical Gardens...

Aechmea ornata nationalis

Photo from East London Bromeliad Society (S.A.) Newsletter, May 2014.

The plant belongs to Pete Pfister and apparently a number of the East London
members have them in flower this winter.

NZ notes:

• On the front cover of our August 2006 Journal
we had a photo of Peter and Jocelyn Coyle's

Aechmea ornata nationalis in flower and
inside the notes about the plant included:

• The plant hails from Brazil and with its green
and yellow stripes it was given the name
nationalis after the national colours of Brazil.

• While the plant is not rare in New Zealand it is
considered difficult to flower.
• We know that the plant will flower in winter
and it seems to do well on a diet of cold mixed
with lots of sunny days.

• Peter and Jocelyn get their plants to flower
regularly.

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

We had a great mid-winter
supper meeting in June,
with eighteen broms in
our rare plant auction. A big thanks
to all those that attended, placed
bids and brought plates for supper.
It's always difficult to attract a good
crowd during the colder months,
so it was nice to see a good turnout.

I was chatting with some members at
the supper about broms suffering in
winter. Remember, if you're having
problems with cup rot etc, empty out
the water, spray a fungicide into the
cups and let the plant dry. Put minimal
water back in the cup and leaf axils
then cut right back on watering, also
keeping the mix on the drier side. This
should kill off any phytophthora fungus
spores that often causes the rot. Another
trick – and a good natural preventative
measure – is to sprinkle the cups of
susceptible broms with normal ground
cinnamon, this will do the same thing!

Speaking of cooking ingredients,
due to popular demand and courtesy
of my better half, I have been forced
to publish this recipe by several
salivating members who tried it at the
recent supper.

'Jeanene's Cheesy Curry Cobb'

Get any large cobb loaf of unsliced
bread, cut off the top to make a lid
and completely hollow out the centre
of the loaf. Take a 250g tub a cream
cheese, a 435g bottle of Best Foods

Lite mayonnaise, about 1 cup grated

tasty cheese, chopped onion, chopped
parsley and a teaspoon of curry powder
(or more to taste) – mix all together
in a bowl and microwave for about
5 minutes to heat the mixture and
soften the onion. Fill the loaf with the
mixture, place the lid on, wrap in tin
foil and heat in oven for 30 minutes.
Serve with sliced French stick bread to
spread and dip the mixture – then enjoy
tearing the loaf apart and eating it too!
A quick and easy party dish that's sure
to be a hit.

Chrissie Stephens, a member of the

Far North Bromeliad Group, is going

to Quito in Ecuador this month. José
Manzanares, who attended our 'Cool
Broms' conference as a guest speaker
last year, is showing her around and
has offered his two fabulous books to
us at a very special price. These are

'Jewels Of The Jungle – Bromeliaceae
Of Ecuador – Part 1 Bromelioideae'
and 'Jewels Of The Jungle –
Bromeliaceae of Ecuador – Part 2
Pitcairnioideae'. They are excellent,
large reference books on most of the
species found in the region. Chrissie
has offered to post books back here
and distribute them when she returns.
If you are interested, please email
her directly at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
to arrange copies and payment etc.

Cheers,

Graeme Barclay

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters

Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Lester Ching 09-576 4595

Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451

David Cowie 09-630 8220

Chris Paterson 09-625 6707

Sandy Stonham 09-627 9658
Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,

Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or

policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.

BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson

Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,

Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first

Tuesday of publication month

Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

'Buy & Swap'

Listings in 'Buy & Swap' are FREE for

members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please

contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

By Graeme Barclay
July's spotlight is on one of the most highly prized and popular variegated
bromeliads of all time.

Aechmea 'Ensign' and Aechmea 'Reverse Ensign'

Once again, we go back in time to
the 1960s, the very early stages
of bromeliad hybridising and
seed propagation to find the origin
of these lovely cultivars. As with
other 'Special Species' highlighted
over the last few months, Aechmea
'Ensign' also arose as a 'seedling
mutation' in the greenhouse of the late
Mr. Ed Ensign in Orlando, Florida.
Thus, it is a 'variegated species
cultivar', but is not found in the wild.

In May 1960 Mr. Ensign noticed four
unusual seedlings in a tray of Aechmea
orlandiana seed he had sowed. Three
appeared to be albino white, while the
fourth showed obvious signs of white
variegation on the green leaves. Over
time, the albino seedlings died off, but
the variegated one developed slowly
into a stunning albomarginated plant,
exhibiting the same form and mottled
leaf markings of its orlandiana parent.
The striking difference however, was
the clear white edges of the leaves
glowed a pinky-red in high light, as
did the mottled markings, creating a
stunning looking plant and something
never seen before in bromeliad
cultivation. Flowering produced a
normal Aechmea orlandiana, red

bracted inflorescence with yellow

petals, so this special plant became
known as Aechmea orlandiana cv.

'Ensign' (later shortened to just
'Ensign' in the BSI Cultivar Register),
duly named after its discoverer and
initial grower. Eventually, pups

became available and when first

offered for sale in the late 1960s, they
sold for hundreds of dollars, such
was its unique quality at the time.

One of the interesting things about
Aechmea 'Ensign', is that because it
was a chimera – (a variegated plant
with white albinistic tissue) – that
had occurred as a seedling mutation,
it unfortunately was not a stable
variegate. As we know, many variegated
bromeliads often provide pups where
the variegations on their leaves do not
look identical to the original plant.
They may become uneven, or striated
with lines of green or white, or the
albino tissue area may increase in size
or envelope entire leaves. The opposite
can also occur and variegation can
disappear altogether, thus reverting the
leaves back to completely green. This
occurs because the chimera is further
degenerating when it reproduces
itself, meaning each different looking
pup to the mother is actually another
vegetative 'sport' or 'mutation'.

Therefore, any subsequent generative
plant that does not resemble the mother
in every way, should not technically

Cont'd P12 11

Cont'd from P11 – Special Species Spotlight

be known by the same name. If you
look at the photo here of my very
white Aechmea 'Ensign' clone, you
will see the leaves have very uneven
variegation and the plant looks quite
different to the plant in the other photo.
Even though it looks similar and is an
interesting plant that bears the 'Ensign'
name, I do not consider it to be a true
Aechmea 'Ensign' as it is obviously a
different looking sport. I have another
plant that looks much more like the
other photo, which is probably as close
as one will get these days to the true
original, dating back to the 1960s.

The original Aechmea 'Ensign' has
very uniform albomarginated leaves,
no striated leaves and is reported to
be quite a large, strong grower. So,
if you have a clone that looks any
different to this, you may wish to
reconsider it as part of your collection
and also be aware when distributing
pups to unsuspecting other growers.

Sometime later in the 1970s. another
variegated Aechmea orlandiana
also surfaced in Florida. This time,
the white variegation was only in
the centre of the leaves, not on the
edges. There are actually two reported
clones of this variegate. One arose
as a vegetative sport off an Aechmea
'Ensign' plant owned by Mulford
Foster, the other occurred the same way
Aechmea 'Ensign' did – via a batch
of orlandiana seed grown by Ervin
Wurthmann. As both clones became
virtually indistinguishable over time,
they were known and registered as
Aechmea 'Reverse Ensign', but like

its 'Ensign' cousin, it is also a variable
chimera, with undoubtedly slightly
different looking clones in circulation
in terms of variegation and size.

Unfortunately, these amazing
aechmeas are not the easiest broms

to grow in New Zealand conditions.
Like the normal Aechmea orlandiana

species, they do not really enjoy the
colder months and need protection
from cold and wet conditions. If
you look back at my whiter plant in
the photos, you will notice brown
markings and spots on the lower
leaves. This is evidence of typical
cold damage and while expected to
be seen on such a white specimen, it
also readily affects the true Aechmea
'Ensign' and 'Reverse Ensign'
variegates if they are not kept warm.

They have a very stoloniferous growth
habit, so are best grown in a hanging
basket in a greenhouse or under plastic,
where they can be positioned up high,
enjoying the warmth and bright light
that enhances the leaf markings and
colour. They respond well to regular,
light feeding in the warmer months,
which ensures they attain a good
size, but more importantly provides

nutrients needed to fight the winter

chills and minimise cold damage
leaf spotting. They will both grow
okay outside as epiphytes in warm
climates, though if you wish to keep
them looking good, it's probably best

to have them in a hanging or unfixed

pot, or mounted on driftwood etc, so
they can be moved to a protected area
in colder months.

Special Species Spotlight...

White sport of Aechmea 'Ensign'.
PhOTO: G. bArCLAy

Aechmea 'Ensign' true clone.
PhOTO: G. bArCLAy

Aechmea 'reverse Ensign'.
PhOTO: G. bArCLAy

13

Learning about the genera : Wittrockia
Article by Chris Paterson. Photos by Peter Waters.

The genus Wittrockia is from the sub-family Bromelioideae. Although a small
genus in number [7 in total] they can reach large sizes , as the name W. gigantea
would suggest , this beauty can reach up to 1.5metres in diameter if grown well.

Wittrockia cyathiformis
Wittrockia 'Leopardinum'

Learning about the genera : Wittrockia
It was Karl Lindman in 1891 that
first created the genus, containing
just a single species, superba.
He originally associated the genus
with Nidularium, and he considered
Wittrockia to be an intermediate
between Nidularium and what we
today call Neoregalia but at the time
known as Regelia. The given name was
in tribute to V. D. Wittrock, Director of
the Botanical Museum of Sweden at
the time. Over the years considerable
change has been made to the genus, even
at times having its category reduced
to a sub-genus of Canistrum. Many
species were added to Wittrockia only
to be later removed. Two reasonably
well known nidulariums (amazonicum
and campus-portoi) were previously
placed within Wittrockia. While other
species have been added i.e. Canistrum
cyathiforme was transferred to become
W. cyathiformis.

It was Elton Leme who in the late

1990s reformed the genus by making a
natural grouping of the species leaving

only the ones with the closest infinity

to Wittrockia superba. Wittrockias are
all endemic to the Atlantic forest of
South Eastern Brazil, with four species
being found in Rio de Janeiro State.
The most wide-spread species being

W. cyathiformis. As a general rule these
plants are quite adaptable growing
from sea level to over 2000 metres,
tolerating both shade and sun making
them ideal landscaping subjects.
The three species available in New
Zealand are:

• Wittrockia superba – from the Latin
word superbus meaning superb or
majestic.

• Wittrockia gigantea – a large plant
with its inflorescence giving rise to

its name, this plant can take up to
13 years to mature and well worth
the wait. W. 'Leopardinum' with its
beautiful leopard spots is actually a
naturally occurring sport or cultivar
of gigantea and not a separate
species.

• Wittrockia cyathiformis – from the
Latin word cyathus referring to its
cup shaped inflorescence. Usually

a green plant, but if grown in good

light will achieve a lovely red/
bronze colouring prior to flowering.

The remaining Wittrockia species

not available in New Zealand are

flavipetala, paulistana, tenuisepala
and spiralipetala.

The inflorescences of all wittrockias are

long-lasting, making them an attractive
addition to any sub-tropical garden or
greenhouse. The only downside being
the large teeth on their leaves which
can also be slightly brittle if kept too

close to passing foot traffic. I have also

noticed that wittrockias seem to do
better and mature faster if left to grow
into a clump rather than being broken
up for pup removal.

Group News

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Sandra Wheeler
Our June meeting was at the Reyburn
House Studio where Jan welcomed 31
members. Maureen Green was thanked for
arranging last month's bus trip.

Matthew Hennessey very kindly brought

along a number of DVDs from the 'Cool

Broms' conference in Auckland 2013. The

first was Elton Leme, from Brazil, on the

genus Alcantarea. This was amazing, with
photos of the 35 species growing in their
natural habitat. These were absolutely
stunning with alcantareas growing en
masse at high altitudes and on the sides of
vertical cliff faces. It showed in great detail

the flowers on the spikes that can grow to

4m tall. This was very well received and by
popular demand Matt showed us parts of

another much longer DVD. This was with
Dennis Cathcart, a Floridian supplier and

speaker, whose bromeliads helped create
Singapore's 'Gardens by the Bay'. This is
a place to visit that we all should put on our
'bucket lists.' Thanks very much to Matt
and Kath.

Competition Results:

1st Maureen Green – Neoregelia 'Letty
Abella', 2nd Jenny Coyne – Neoregelia
hybrid (Poppy), 3rd Decima Severinsen –
Neoregelia 'Small World'

All 12 names went into a lucky draw and

the winners were Lyn White and Decima

Severinsen

Next Meeting: Sunday July 27th 1.30pm
at the home of Jan Mahoney, 33 TeToiroa

Road, Ngunguru. Competition plant:

Vriesea.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
Our July meeting was held in the Plastic
House at the Auckland Botanic Gardens
with an excellent turnout. Marie Healey
welcomed everyone including new
members and guests and again reminded
members that annual subscriptions are due
for 2014.

Our guest speaker was Robert Flanagan on
tillandsias. He gave a really interesting and
informative talk on the difference between
soft-leafed green and grey tillandsias and

explained that growing them in the New
Zealand climate is very different to their

native habitat as they don't like the wet
and cold. Robert brought along some of
his tillandsias to show the group including

T. tectorum, T. capitata, T. flabellata, T.
streptophylla, T. streptophylla 'Anna',

T. tectorum var tectorum, T. cardenasii,
T. tricholepis, T. intermedia, T. baileyi,
T. baileyi 'Halleys Comet', T. ionantha
'Peanut', T. ionantha and T. disticha to
name but a few. Carolyn Scholes brought
along a T. guatemalensis, and Win
Shorrock a fragrant T. crocata.
The monthly raffles were won by Judy

Graham, Robyn Mason and Tony Green.

Next Meeting: Sunday, 3rd August, at the

Auckland Botanic Gardens at 1:30pm

in the Friends House. Hawi Winter will
repeat the PowerPoint presentation that he
gave at the 'Cool Broms' conference.

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Lynley Breeze
Lynley welcomed 44 members and visitors

to the meeting, a good attendance in spite

of the raging storm. Our guest speaker
Sandra Simpson spoke about her visit

to the Disneyland gardens in California.

Bill Evans designed the gardens and
worked there until he was 92. The design
represents various themes and the plantings
include lots of bromeliads, cycads, palms,

philodendrons and also many NZ plants.

The landscape defines the areas and breaks

them up in such a way that the boundaries
are not obvious. The maintenance is huge
and there are 100 gardeners who start

work at 2.00am and finish by 10.00am 365

days per year. All irrigation takes place

overnight. The plantings reflect the theme

of each area so a futuristic style is found
in 'Tomorrowland.' Sandra writes a good
gardening blog at http://sandrasgardenblog.
wordpress.com/

Competitions:
Plant of the month – Tillandsia:

1st Tillandsia rodrigueziana – Gill Keesing,
2nd T. tectorum – Gill Keesing, 3rd equal

T. stricta – B. Nalder and T. meridionalis
x stricta – Audrey Hewson. Also tabled
were Tillandsia erubescens, seleriana x
pruinosa, and streptophylla.
Open competition: 1st Billbergia
'Hallelujah' – Gill Keesing, 2nd Vriesea
'Joyful Charm' – Barbara Nalder.

Tillandsia: 1st Tillandsia fuchsii – Bertha
Schollum, 2nd T. ionantha – Audrey
Hewson, 3rd T. tectorum – Audrey Hewson,
others tabled were a large form of

T. latifolia, T. butzii and T. recurvifolia.
'Show and Tell': Jo Elder and Bertha
Schollum brought along Tillandsia
streptophylla grown in different conditions.
One had been grown outside and was not
stressed; the other two were stressed with
less water being supplied to them and were
very curly.
Next Meeting: 13th August. Peter and
Jocelyn Coyle will be our guest speakers.
The plant of the month will be any vrieseas.

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
Orchid Group – Alison Iremonger

Sue welcomed 31 members to our June
meeting, held in the Community Hall at
Matata. Our guest speakers for the meeting

were Dave and Joan Anderson. Our August

meeting was discussed, which is going to
involve making pottery plant holders to
hang in trees. A challenge, but it sounds
very interesting.

Pam Signal had a display of cattleyas and
oncidiums, which she talked about, in
our 'Show and Tell' part of the meeting.

Then Dave and Joan gave a presentation
on their trip to Mexico. Dave had brought

a collection of aechmeas, nidulariums,
vrieseas, alcantareas and tillandsias.
He talked about each of the plants, and
answered any questions the members had.
Sue then thanked Maureen, Jean and Ruth

for organising the day. Raffles were drawn.

The sales table had a great selection to
choose from. Afternoon tea was served.

Competition Results:
Tillandsia: 1st An assortment of tillandsias
on driftwood – Ross Fergusson, 2nd T.
crocata – Kevin Pritchard, 3rd T. albertiana

– Kevin Pritchard, 4th T. compressa – Pam
Signal
Non Flowering: 1st Vriesea 'Cherry
Snow' – Kevin Pritchard, 2nd Crypthanthus
'It'– Kevin Pritchard, 3rd Neo. 'Ryan Red
Beauty" – Ross Fergusson
Flowering: 1st Orthophytum gurkenii –
Kevin Pritchard, 2nd Aechmea 'Foster's
Favorite' – Kevin Pritchard, 3rd equal
Neo hybrid – Pam Signal and Nidularium
amazonicum – Ross Fergusson
Next Meeting: 20th July at the Professional
Real Estate rooms. Guest speaker: Kevin

Pritchard. Visitors always welcome.

Contacts – Ross Fergusson 07-312 5487,
Sue Laurent 07-307 1323, Maureen Moffat

07-322 2276.

Eden Garden... beautiful in winter

– Article and photos by Murray Mathieson
This two hectares of beauty, in the
heart of Auckland, has its own
special 'Bromeliad Glade'

Eden Garden was created in 1964
in an abandoned quarry. Fifty
years on and there are giant
nikau palms, kauri, rimu, totara and
ferns, all providing protection and a
backdrop for a wonderful collection
of under plantings including vireyas,
camellias, rhododendrons, hostas,
Japanese maples, succulents, roses,
perennials and bromeliads. The garden
is also home to tuis, wood pigeons,
fantails and kingfishers.

By definition a 'glade' is an open space

in a forest or wooded area. The Eden
Garden 'Bromeliad Glade' is all of
that... and more. The glade is actually
a very interesting and character-

filled rocky outcrop that is home to

great plantings of bromeliads that are
thriving around and on the rocks and
trees and in natural planting beds. There
are many surprises including stone
staircases, twisting paths, impressive
rock forms, secluded seated areas and
impressive lookout points.

In winter, the low morning sun filters

through the canopy high above and
splashes welcome light on moist plants
and rocks to create many beautiful and
subtle 'textures' and contrasts.

Our Society's close association with
Eden Garden dates back to January
1973 when our life member, Peter

Waters, approached Jack Clark, a key
founding member of the Eden Garden
Society, to see if it would be possible to
plant some bromeliads. In discussion
with Peter, a previously empty and
barren rocky outcrop was made
available. About twenty Bromeliad
Society members then donated broms
and put in many voluntary hours to get
the glade up and running. The project

got a major boost in the 1980s when

the estate of a former Brom Society
president, Bill Rogers, bequeathed an
extensive collection of plants.

The Eden Garden 'Bromeliad Glade'
has been an on-going informal
Bromeliad Society project and 'work
in progress' for over 40 years. At times
we've been very active with regular
'working bees' and many enthusiastic
helpers and at other times we've been
less involved and the glade has suffered
and slipped back a bit. Alan Thomson
led a group of Society volunteers
around the 2005 to 2007 period and
president Jocelyn Coyle got things
moving forward again over the last few
years. Peter Waters has always been
actively involved. In 2014, Society

members Isla McGowan and Lynette
Nash have been organising a small, but

enthusiastic, team of volunteers who
attend regular monthly working bees.
This winter the team has been focusing
on keeping the plants and paths free of
dead leaves and small debris resulting
from the several mini storms we've
experienced in Auckland.

Eden Garden...
Like to help?

Working bees are on the first Friday morning of every month starting around
9.30am : August 1st; September 5th; October 3rd; November 7th; December 5th.
Please contact our Society member: Isla McGowan Tel: 524-8733

Eden Garden is at 24 Omana Ave, Epsom. www.edengarden.co.nz

More photos on back cover 19

Eden Garden... beautiful in winter
Time for a break!
From left: Joan Anderson,
Isla McGowan and Diane Timmins

 August 2014VOL 54 NO 8

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – August 2014 issue

CONTENTS
President's Page – Graeme Barclay 3
Bromeliad Society July meeting news – Dave Anderson 4
The Hybridising Journey – Andrew Devonshire 6
'Kiwi Bromeliads' Open Day information 9
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 10
Group News 11
Symbiotic relationships – Dudley Reynolds 13
Learning about the genera: Dave Anderson on Catopsis 16
'Special Species Spotlight' – Graeme Barclay 18

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 11 for details of group
meeting times and venues.

AUGUST SEPTEMBER
26th Society monthly meeting at 7th South Auckland Group meeting
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt 10th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
Eden and Windmill roads, starting 14th Tillandsia Group meeting
at 7.30pm. The Monthly Choice 23rd Society monthly meeting at
competition: Neoregelia 'Wild Tiger'. Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt
Peter Waters will talk on aechmeas. Eden and Windmill roads, starting

at 7.30pm. The Monthly Choice

competition: Tillandsia aeranthos.

Lester Ching will talk on tillandsias.

FRONT COVER: Catopsis sessiliflora in flower. Photo by Peter Tristram.

This month in our 'Learning about the genera' series, we are taking an in-depth
look at the genus Catopsis. Dave Anderson has written an interesting article
starting on page 16.

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Hello everyone,

I hope you are surviving the winter
chills wherever you are and the 'cold
spots' have not made too much of an
appearance on your prize broms. We
were lucky to have had an awesome 12
days holiday in July over on the Gold
Coast and Sunshine Coast, escaping to
brilliant blue skies every day and 2023 degrees was bliss this time of year!

Going on holiday around this time of
year for me is best, as the greenhouse
plants and all the seedlings need
minimal water and attention to keep
themselves going. There was some
discussion during supper at our July
meeting about the prevalence each
winter of 'cold and wet' conditions
affecting the growing of broms here.
While many plants can deal with one
or the other for a period of time, it's
often the combination of them BOTH
at the same time that they don't enjoy.
When both 'cold and wet' are in full

flight, leaves go spotty and brown

around the edges and sometimes root
rot, vase rot and complete collapse can
occur. It's much easier (and cheaper)
trying to keep cold-tender plants drier
during winter by moving them under
shelter and minimizing the watering

– rather than keeping them warm.
This is the easiest thing you can do
to minimize damage, so if you are
having problems, maybe re-think your
positioning and the amount of water.
A reminder to check out the updated
details in this Journal of the 'Open
Day' coming up on October 12th at
Kiwi Bromeliads. This is shaping up to
be a great day, with silent auctions for
special plants, auctions, fun fundraiser

games, a plant competition, raffle,

sausage sizzle and some top growers
also selling plants to complement the
Maloy's fantastic vrieseas. We look
forward to a great crowd and plenty of
willing buyers!

I would like to thank the 29 other
members for leaving their slippers and
heaters at home last month to attend
our Auckland meeting. While we had
some apologies from a few regulars
who were ill or travelling overseas,
it was still the lowest turnout we
have had to a meeting in some years.
Remember, the meeting is for YOU to
enjoy, all BSNZ members are welcome

– bring a friend or family member
along as a visitor if you like!
We have some great speakers lined up
over the next few months, starting this
month with a not-to-be-missed talk on
the diverse Aechmea genus by Peter
Waters. A lot of work by a dedicated
committee and regular helpers goes
into preparing our monthly meetings
and talks – so if you haven't made an
appearance in a while, please consider
coming along to enjoy the evening and
supporting your Society... See you
there!

Cheers, Graeme Barclay

Bromeliad Society July Meeting News

– Dave Anderson
President Graeme chaired the
meeting and welcomed everyone
on a very cold and miserable
winter's night. He mentioned that Joan
Anderson is coordinating the tidying up
of the Bromeliad Glade at Eden Garden
on Friday 1st of August. Please give her
a ring if you can help. We are always
looking for articles for the Journal so if
you are able to write about a garden or
something on bromeliads please contact
the editor Murray Mathieson.

Peter Waters took us through the 'Show
and Tell' plants. First up for display were
two clumps of the species Tillandsia
velickiana. One clump had the pups
appearing from the base of the plant as
normal whilst the other clump had a pup
coming up from the centre of the plant

where the flower spike would normally

appear. Peter said that this sort of thing
does happen from time to time with a
number of bromeliads. Also for display
was the species Vriesea fosteriana
'Vista' showing the leaves with their
predominantly white bands.

Graeme Barclay then gave a brief talk
on some of the different implements
that people use for taking pups off the
mother plants. A list of the tools included
a hacksaw blade, a bread knife, secateurs
and a 'Stanley knife'.

David Cowie then showed a PowerPoint
presentation of three gardens from
San Diego in southern California. The
gardens looked absolutely superb.
Chris Paterson won this month's special

raffle prize. The door prizes went to Judy

Graham, Donna Cramond and Carolle
Roberts.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First David Goss
with Aechmea orlandiana (dark form) –
always a most attractive plant. David was
also second with Nidularium innocentii.

Open Foliage: Judy Graham was first

with Neoregelia 'Tiger' x 'Rainbow'.
Second was John Muddiman with
Aechmea 'Bert' (variegated). In
the competition were Aechmea
phanerophlebia, lueddemanniana
'MEND' and Guzmania 'Decora' hybrid.

Tillandsia: Lester Ching was first

with Tillandsia recurvifolia var
subsecundifolia. Second with a clump
of Tillandsia latifolia was Judy Graham.
Other plants on the table were Tillandsia
bulbosa, jucunda and tectorum.

Neoregelia: First John Muddiman with
Neoregelia 'Jewellery Shop'. Second
equal were Graeme Barclay with
Neoregelia 'Spotted Frog' and David
Goss with Neoregelia 'Gympie Bingo'.
Also in the competition was Neoregelia
'Night Sky'.

Named Monthly Plant – Aechmea
orlandiana: First was David Goss with
Aechmea orlandiana 'Rainbow'. Second
was David Goss with Aechmea 'Ensign'.

The Plant of the Month went to
Judy Graham's Neoregelia 'Tiger' x
'Rainbow'.

Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING: Tues 26th August.

Plants at the Society's July meeting...

Aechmea orlandiana 'Rainbow'
(David Goss). First in 'Monthly Choice' –
Aechmea orlandiana and hybrids.
Photo: Dave Anderson

Tillandsia recurvifolia var subsecundifolia
(Lester Ching). First in tillandsia section.
Photo: Dave Anderson
Neoregelia 'Jewellery Shop' (John
Muddiman). First in neoregelia section.
Photo: Dave Anderson
Neoregelia 'Tiger x 'Rainbow'
(Judy Graham). First in open foliagesection and 'Plant of the Month'.
Photo: Dave Anderson
Neoregelia 'Spotted Frog' (Graeme
Barclay). Second equal in neoregeliasection. Photo: Graeme Barclay

Neoregelia correia-araujoi Neoregelia 'Gold Fever'

The Hybridising Journey

Original seedlings 25 months; best seedling selected at 2yrs

Close up of Neoregelia 'Kohawhero'

The Hybridising Journey

– Article and photos by Andrew Devonshire
Andrew Devonshire is one of our active and successful hybridisers of bromeliads.
Over the next few months he is preparing a series of articles that will give us all
a deeper insight into the thinking, planning, attention to detail and the patience
that goes into making a new attractive and stable hybrid bromeliad that we can
all enjoy.

Why are hybrid bromeliads so
popular? Could it be because
we all have an insatiable
desire for the new, the different and the
unique?

Thanks to the dedication of bromeliad
hybridists, we have a steady stream of
new creations to feed our addiction.
However, to keep producing these new
and exciting plants, the hybridist has to
blend elements of science and art, along
with a good measure of imagination
and patience. I say patience as it
typically takes many years from the
concept of a new hybrid, to the reality
of the release of a new plant.

Over the next few months I will profile

some hybrids, so we can all take the
hybridising journey. This month I
profile Neoregelia 'Kohawhero' a
cross of correia-araujoi and 'Gold
Fever'.

My early hybridising focus was
on the large neoregelias like 'Gee
Whiz', johannis and correia-araujoi.
The goal was to create large, tough
garden plants that would stand up
to our hot summers and cold wet
winters.

Of these large plants, Neo. correiaaraujoi was a firm favourite. The outer

leaves of correia-araujoi turn a rich
brick red colour and they still look
good for many months. There are a
few different clones of correia-araujoi
in New Zealand and some are better

than others. I was determined to find

the best. After months of searching, I
was able to purchase a pup from a very
attractive clone.

Over the next couple of years as my
plant matured, I imagined all sorts
of possible hybrid combinations.
Neoregelia 'Justin's Song' was one
correia-araujoi hybrid that I really
liked and it provided inspiration for
what I wanted to create.

During December 2006 my correiaaraujoi came into flower and I had
Neoregelia 'Gold Fever' lined up as
the prime pollen parent. 'Gold Fever'
has brilliant crimson colouration, with
attractive gold spotting, however,
in our climate, it typically does not
develop great form. My goal was to
achieve a large tough landscaping plant
with good form, the best traits from the
mother plant and combine this with the
colour intensity of 'Gold Fever'.

I pollinated a good number of flowers

and about three months later the berries
were ripe, indicated by their rich chilli
red colouration. About a hundred seeds

Cont'd P8

Cont'd from P7 – The Hybridising Journey

were set up, they germinated well and
the seedlings showed vigorous growth.
After about a year of growth, I was able
to start selecting out the best seedlings.
Some were showing a hint of the rich
'Gold Fever' type colouring with well

defined marmoration. The default

setting for marmorated hybrids seems
to be washed out reddish colouration

with fine spots, so to have some

seedlings showing early potential was
very encouraging.

At the two year mark, I culled the grex

down to the best five plants. These

all showed the bright marmoration
of 'Gold Fever' and were starting to
develop the size and form of correiaaraujoi.

During December 2009, the first of
my selected plants flowered. This was

at least a season earlier than I had
expected, but it turns out that early

flowering is a trait of most correiaaraujoi hybrids.

The plant continued to develop very
well and it produced a good batch of
pups. This hybrid had the combination
of traits I was seeking, it had the nice
bright marmoration of 'Gold Fever'
and it has proved to be as tough and
almost as large as correia-araujoi.
A couple of bonus features are the
yellow bands that show up from time
to time and the white colouration that
develops in the cup as the plant comes

into flower.

After proving itself in the garden over
a couple of generations, the plant was

finally named and registered in 2012.

I enjoy the naming process... it's
like a mark of honour that the plant
has earned, and I always like to have

some significance, or a story behind

the name.

For this hybrid, the name I chose was
'Kohawhero'. It is a composite Maori
name with 'Koha' meaning gift of
treasure and 'Whero' meaning red. The
gift of treasure was the gold spotting
from 'Gold Fever' and the red was
obviously for the brick red outer leaves
and the bright red cup colour.

'Kohawhero' was first released at the

'Cool Broms' conference in March
2013, just over six years from when
those bright chilli red berries were
harvested. However, if you take into
account the fact that my original
concept for this hybrid was actually
planned out during 2003 that makes
ten years from concept to pollination,
to seedlings, to selection, to release.

As the famous tennis player Arthur
Ashe said,

'Success is a
journey not a
destination.
The doing is
often more
important
than the
outcome.'

COMING SOON...
OpeN Day

Sunday October 12th, 10am to 3pm

Your hosts will be Andrew and Rhonda Maloy,
16 Riverlea Road, Whenuapai, Auckland. Phone (09) 416 3543

Don't miss this exciting bromeliad event!

• OPEN TO ALL MEMBERS OF BROMELIAD SOCIETY OF NZ
• Plenty of vrieseas for sale, some only recently registered
with BSI

• A great range of other broms available from specialist
growers including – Peter and Jocelyn Coyle from Totara
Waters, Lester and Bev Ching, Diana Holt, Peter Waters
and Di Timmins.
• Off road parking
• Tea, coffee, sausage sizzle and toilet facilities
• Silent auction of some rare and sought after broms
• Kiwi Vriesea competition – bring along your best Kiwi
Vriesea and be in to win
• Bromeliad racing!!
• Raffles
October 12th – MARK YOUR DIARY NOW!
Footnote re 'Broms in the Park'. Due to an overload of
commitments, Jocelyn and Peter Coyle of Totara Waters are
unable to host the normal 'Broms in the Park' event this year.
The 'Kiwi Bromeliads Open Day' provides a welcome, worthy and
intriguing replacement. See you there!

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters

Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451
David Cowie 09-630 8220
Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Sandy Stonham 09-627 9658
Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
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Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first

Tuesday of publication month

Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
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Quarter Page $15.00

'Buy & Swap'

Listings in 'Buy & Swap' are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
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Group News

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Lynley Breeze
Lynley welcomed 42 members and
visitors to the meeting and noted that
there are now 104 paid up members. We
discussed taking a bus trip to Andrew
Maloy's 'Kiwi Bromeliads' Open Day
as 'Broms in the Park' is cancelled and
there was general enthusiasm for this so
we will visit on 12th October.

It was wonderful to have Peter Waters
as our guest speaker once again. Peter
started with a 'Show and Tell' session
about odd genera, which are not widely
known in NZ gardens. He showed a
Vriesea vagans with mottled leaves and

no dark tip, yet confirmed that the green

one with the dark tips is also correctly
named, but that we seem to have only the
one clone available in NZ. Until 1966,
Vr vagans was known as a synonym
of Vr philippo-coburgii. We got on to
nomenclature issues as someone asked
about the difference between tillandsias
and vrieseas when so many look very
similar. It used to be easy as vrieseas

have two flaps on the petals but the lines

are blurred since they are reclassifying
genera. Botanista is working on the

reclassification and basing it more on

appearances so that the grouping is
more logical. DNA analysis will also
contribute. There will be at least seven
new genera. New names are accepted
if there is a cogent article published in
a reputable Botanical Journal, which
is not challenged. You can expect a
lot of changed names as well as plants
moving from one genus to another. We

do appreciate this academic input, and
maintaining our links with the Bromeliad
Society of NZ.

There were three lucky raffle winners.

Competition results:
Plant of the month-Nidulariums: Only
four plants were tabled in this event, 1st
Gill Keesing – Nidularium innocentii
'Nana', 2nd Margaret Mangos –
Nidularium rutilans and 3rd Gill Keesing

– Nidularium fulgens
'Show and Tell': Wilma Fitzgibbons
had a tillandsia and was querying the
name, the label read orgens, and maybe
it is orogenes.
Novice Section: 1st Diana Fiford –
Vriesea 'Charm' hybrid
Open competition: 1st Graeme
Alabaster – Neoregelia 'Aussie Dream',
2nd Barbara Nalder – Vriesea 'Crimson
Autumn' and 3rd Graeme Alabaster –
Vriesea 'Pacific Ruby'. Also tabled were

Neoregelia 'Cayenne' and Aechmea

caudata var melonocrater
Tillandsia: 1st Tillandsia gardneri

– Audrey Hewson, 2nd Tillandsia
mitlaensis – Bertha Schollum and 3rd
Tillandsia tectorum – Audrey Hewson.
Also tabled Tillandsia recurvifolia var
subsecundafolia and Tillandsia 'Red
Fountain' also Tillandsia ixioides.
Next Meeting: 10th September. Roger
Allen will speak and have a PowerPoint
presentation about his visit to the
fantastic gardens in Singapore.

The garden visits for October have been
cancelled.

Cont'd P12 11

Cont'd from P11 – Group News

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
Our meeting on 3rdAugust was held in the
Friends House at the Auckland Botanic
Gardens and we had an excellent turnout.
Our Guest Speaker, Dr. Hawi Winter,
gave us the PowerPoint presentation

that he first gave at the 'Cool Broms'

conference in Auckland. Hawi did a
thoroughly professional job and it was
great to see him up and well again after

his horrific year so far. Marie Healey

welcomed everyone including new
members and guests and again reminded
members that annual subscriptions are
now due for 2014.

Members were reminded to bring
along their 'skite plants' to each of
our meetings. On 9th November we
will be having a trip to Matakana and
Warkworth. Please see Margaret Kitcher
for bookings. The cost will be $30 per

person. The monthly raffle of plants was

won by Dawn Ashton and Pat Johnston.

Next Meeting: Sunday, 7th September in
the Subtropical House at the Auckland
Botanic Gardens commencing at
1:30pm. Our guest speaker will be John
Mitchell talking about hybridizing.

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Sandra Wheeler
Our July meeting was held at the home
of our President Jan Mahoney, who
welcomed 25 members and visitors. The
garden was beautiful and we all enjoyed
at least one stroll among the bromeliads,
succulents, palms and much more.

McGregor Smith very kindly brought
along a number of plants to show us,

demonstrating what can attack your
favourite bromeliads during the cold
and wet winter months. Dieback results
from being too dry or too wet. We saw
an under potted dyckia with thick leaves
preventing moisture getting to the
plant... tillandsias that don't like the wet
and an example of an aechmea with bad
spotting due to the cold. There were two
quite different looking Neoregelia 'Gee
Whiz' with the difference in the colour
and growth due to situations like too
much shade/sun. Our hot summer has left
many broms with sun spots a reminder
to keep a watch and move if a plant is
showing signs of any stress or bleaching.
We were warned of the soil borne,
water mould fungus Phytophthora that
can spread among plants. The best way
to protect plants is to give them good
air circulation. Jan thanked Mac for his
very interesting talk. We all learned a lot
from it.

Tillandsia Group – Lester Ching

Our July meeting was held at Isabel and
Dave Dawson's home in Pakuranga.
Dave showed us through his glasshouses
where he grows tillandsias and lithops.
We then wandered through his garden
looking at different plants. The subject
for the meeting was Tillandsia ionantha.
It was very informative and the plants
on display quite varied, having been
grown in different situations. If you are
interested in tillandsias then you should
join this group to learn more and have
fun growing them.

Next Meeting: September 14th at
1.00pm at Lester and Bev Ching,
32 Pandora Place, We will be discussing
tillandsia displays with a difference. $25
for the winner.

Symbiotic relationships between
bromeliads and other organisms

– Dudley Reynolds, writing in the East London (SA)
Bromeliad Society Newsletter, June 2014.
The word 'symbiosis' means
'together life'. It refers to
organisms that live in close
approximation to each other. There are
three types of symbiosis:

• Parasitism – parasite benefits and
the host suffers as a result.

• Commensualism – one speciesbenefits and the other is neither
hurt nor helped.

• Mutualism – both species benefit.
This symbiotic behaviour occurs often
in nature between two organisms. One
that springs to mind is the unlikely
relationship between the Nile crocodile
and the Egyptian plover bird, where the
crocodile lets the bird clean his teeth
and the plover gets food. This would
be referred to as mutualism which we
are going to discuss further.

Let us think of a few organisms that
live in bromeliads especially in their
natural habitat, but also in our gardens:
tadpoles, tiny salamanders, tree frogs
and many small microscopic organisms
live in the water which is stored in the
many tank type bromeliads. Snails,

flatworms and tiny crabs might spend

their whole life in a bromeliad tank.
A large percentage of bromeliads are
epiphytic. (i.e grows on other plants,
rocks etc. and uses its roots to anchor

itself to the host. They are not parasites
as they take in nutrients through their
own leaves).

Leaves and other natural debris fall
into these reservoirs and help algae
and other single organisms to grow,
which in turn feeds mosquito larvae
which forms an important link in
the food chain and provide nutrients
for the larvae and the bromeliad.

Dragonflies and beetles lay their

eggs in the tanks. Many animals seek
shelter in bromeliads hiding from their
predators or harsh weather conditions.
Some snakes search for their prey in
bromeliads. Several small mammals
depend on bromeliads for a water
source, not to mention our own dogs
and cats that are often seen drinking
water from bromeliad tanks in our
gardens.

Water in bromeliads is not the only

resource they provide, the flowers

and their nectar draw a wide range

of pollinators that find nutrition

there.

These pollinators include bees,

wasps, butterflies and hummingbirds.
Bromeliad flowers are a refuge for

many acarid species (a type of mite)
that use the beak and nostrils of the
pollinating hummingbird as a means

of transportation from one flower

to the next in search of a mate. The

Cont'd P14 13

Cont'd from P13 – Symbiotic relationships between bromeliads and other organisms

relationship is so specialised that

the flower of a particular bromeliad

species has only one acarid species
that uses it as a host. Although the

hummingbird pollinates the flowers of

many different bromeliad species and
therefore carries many acarids in its
beak and nostrils, each acarid settles
on the appropriate bromeliad species

to find its mate and then goes on to

reproduce.

The humidity found inside bromeliads
is very important, not only to animals
but to some plants. Seeds that fall inside

a bromeliad during dispersal find more

favourable conditions for germination
than in drier environments outside
the plant. This happens frequently in
habitats where water is scarce and is
concentrated in a bromeliad, e.g. as
in the dry coastal plain environment
(restinga). Here seed germination
is rarer on the poor sandy soil than
inside bromeliads. These soils are poor
in nutrients and are exposed to high
temperatures because of the intense
sun shining on the sand.

The symbiosis between bromeliads
and the Wild Tamarind Tree (Lysiloma
latisiliquum) found in southern Florida
is demonstrated by the bromeliads that
grow on the sides and branches of the
tree seeking sunlight and nutrients.
During dry periods the tree extends
roots into the bromeliads living on its
surfaces to tap into the large reservoirs
of water.

Bromeliads being mostly epiphytic
attach themselves and grow on trees

and branches. Sometimes they over
populate a tree and because they can
hold litres of water become a negative
for the host tree. Some tillandsias
are called mermecophytes as they
play host to ant colonies. Ants take
refuge between the leaves on the
more bulbous types of tillandsias
creating a protected area for the ants

to live in. The benefit to the plant is

protection from plant eating predators
and automatic fertilisation from ant
deposits and matter!

Estimates from recent studies give
an idea of how important bromeliads
are in the environment in which
they live. One study estimated that
two million litres of water can be
stored inside the bromeliad Vriesea
neoglutinosa in a 210 hectares of
restinga in the state of Espirito
Santo, Brazil. Another study
estimated that there are nearly 104
000 bromeliads in each hectare.
If we estimate conservatively that
each bromeliad tank holds some
50 organisms of different species,
then every hectare would have at
least 5,200,000 organisms living in
bromeliads!

One last bit of information: a rainforest
canopy of trees is so dense and sunlight
hungry that only between 3% – 15%
of the sun's rays penetrate it. Now
we can understand why the majority
of bromeliads growing in the
rainforests have evolved as epiphytes
as they climb up the trees towards the
sunlight.

Symbiotic relationships...

The Egyptian plover bird picks food out of the Nile A tree in Espirito Santo, Brazil is
crocodile's teeth. host toVriesea neoglutinosa.

The leaves of Aechmea pectinata turn shocking pink at blooming time to
attract birds which pollinate the plant.

Learning about the genera : Catopsis

– Article by Dave Anderson
The genus Catopsis 'ka-top-sis'
was established by the German
botanist Rudolf Grisebach in
1864. The word catopsis comes from
the Greek word meaning 'view',
probably because they are mainly
found growing high up in trees.

The genus consists of approximately
twenty-two species found growing
in Florida, Mexico, through Central

America to Brazil and Peru. They
are epiphytes that grow in full sun
to semi-shade in the tropical forests.
Plants in this genus usually have

rather soft, floppy, green leaves that

form a vase like urn. On most plants,
the bottoms of the leaves have a waxy
appearance. The leaves often curl
back and downward away from the
plant. The leaves are spineless and

flowers protrude from the centre on

Catopsis nutans from
the wilds of Colombia.
Photo: Peter Tristram
Catopsis morreniana.
Photo: Shane Weston
Catopsis subulata. Photo: Peter Tristram
16

Learning about the genera : Catopsis
long stalks. The inflorescence usually

stands upright with numerous white

yellow or light green flowers.

The culture of Catopsis is relatively
simple in that the plants can be grown
like green tillandsias albeit that here
in Auckland they need to be given
some extra warmth through the winter
months. The following species that
have been brought to N.Z. can be
grown in pots or as epiphytes

Catopsis berteroniana is one of only
a few bromeliads that are considered
carnivorous. They are epiphytic
growing on trees, shrubs or on rocks
with an incredibly broad range
starting in the southern tip of Florida
and stretching down through Central
America and into Southern Brazil at
low altitudes. Catopsis berteroniana is
nicknamed the jungle lantern because
of their iridescent yellow colour.
The leaves are 30-40cm long and are
coated in a powdery wax that seems to
enhance the glowing appearance. The

tall inflorescence can reach a height of

90cm. These plants trap insects in their
central urn, where they drown and
become a sort of nutrient soup as they
decompose. It is debated as to whether
or not this plant is truly carnivorous,
but it is clear that insects are an
important part of this bromeliad's diet.

Catopsis hahnii is a small plant with
leaves some 45cm long by 4.5cm wide
that are covered with a white powder.

It has a 25cm long inflorescence with

white petals. It is quite a widespread
species found in Mexico, Guatemala,
Honduras, El Salvador and Nicaragua.

Catopsis morreniana a small species
with a dense rosette that has leaves
glaucous at their base. The branched

inflorescence produces delicate yellow
flowers.

Catopsis nutans – this endangered

species has floppy green leaves some
30cm long. The simple inflorescence
produces yellow to orange flowers.

Catopsis sessiliflora is a small
plant with leaves 8cm long. The

inflorescence rises above the foliage

and is usually simple having white

flowers. This particular species is

the hardiest of the catopsis that are
in NZ and can be grown outdoors in
Auckland all year round.

Catopsis subulata – this species grows
up to 60cm high with numerous green
leaves that form a pseudo-bulb at the
base. The leaves also have the white
powder on their undersides.

Catopsis are an overlooked genus of
bromeliad. While their foliage is not

always flashy and the inflorescence

isn't always stunning, they can be
attractive and very interesting plants.
If you are a bromeliad enthusiast, you
will no doubt collect some of these
species.

By Graeme Barclay
............................................................................................................................................
....................................................................................................................................

Neoregelia 'Skotak's Tiger'...
and the Neoregelia carcharodon tale

Around twenty odd years
ago, Chester Skotak of
Costa Rica visited Brazil
and encountered some new and
stunning large neoregelias in the
Niteroi region in Rio de Janeiro state.
These plants, while quite obviously
forms of .................... ....................Q
or close relatives, possessed some
exquisitely different features.

One specimen had a burnt orange-
yellow colour to the leaves, irregular
black bandings and spots on both sides
of the leaf, an upright funnel-form
rosette, large black spines and black
leaf tips. It was an awe-inspiring sight
to Chester, prompting him to later
comment – "....................................................
..............................................................................
................ ...... ........ .......... .......... ....´

– with reference to the fact he was
................................................................................

destroyed by forest clearing, or goats
eating them!

The plant was eventually acquired via
a local collector and shipped back to
Florida – along with three other new
....................Q forms we now know as
..................D 'Rainbow', 'Macho' and
'Silver'– where they entered cultivation
and were all quickly multiplied.

At this time, it was indeed considered
(along with the other three plants)
to be a cultivar of ....................
...................... and thus not formally
described as a new species. Hence,
it was named and registered with the
BSI Registrar ..................D 'Tiger', due
to its remarkable resemblance when
fully coloured in orange and black, to
the largest cat in the world. The name
was recently amended to included

.................... .... .. .......... .... .......... ....

differentiate it from the other registered
'Tiger' (now known as 'Baker's
Tiger') and in recognition of Chester,
who introduced it into cultivation.

.................... ....................Q as a species
has historically been clouded in
mystery. There has been confusion
and ongoing arguments over the
years regarding 'what does the true
...................... actually look like?'...
and...'where is a true specimen of it
now?' It was originally discovered

......................................................................

described in 1935 by botanist Dr.
Lyman Smith. A famous drawing
made in 1882 still exists, depicting a
large rosetted, grey-green plant, with
impressive spines resembling a 'shark
tooth'....................................................................

..........................................Q – in reference

to the teeth shape of ......................
..................V – the latin name for the
'Great White Shark'.

The problem is this originally
described plant no longer appears to
be in cultivation to compare, or its
identity has possibly been usurped by
other similar looking forms – i.e. what
we now know as either ..................D
'Silver' or 'Spines'. Today these
plants and many of their large hybrids
are affectionately known as 'Sharks'
amongst many brom growers – so if
you hear this term used, you now know
what it means!

Further 'bloodying the waters'
in the late 1970s, another 'shark'
was circling, known as ....................
....................Q 'Rubra'. It was a softer

................................................................................

and was used by Chester Skotak as
the pollen parent to create ..................D
'Yin' and 'Yang' – but was listed
simply as "......................" in the BSI
Cultivar Register. At one stage in the
early 1990s, bromeliad expert Harry
Luther, considered this to be the true
.................... ......................, but this
appears to have been retracted, as it is
now formally described as ....................
........... While also large and toothy, it too
has a few different forms and turns out
not be as closely related to ....................
...................... as once believed.

Another well known plant,
.................... ......................, also
resembles 'carcharodon types' in
many ways and may be related, but
it comes from Bahia state much
further north. In the late 1980s and
early 1990s it was also circulating

N.......................................................
................................
in New Zealand and Australia as
'carcharodon', but it now correctly
stands as a separate species on its own.

..................D 'Skotak's Tiger' is a
fantastic plant to grow in New Zealand
gardens. It handles the cold weather
relatively well and can be positioned
in full sun here over summer, without
burning. It is vigorous and very
generous with numerous pups around

..............................................................................

80cm in diameter and 80cm high when
grown well The trick is to get the slow
release fertiliser and light level for pups

.................. 19

Cont'd from P19 – Special Species Spotlight

right so it attains good form and size
as it grows. When mature, starve and
bake it in full sun so the leaves develop
a burnt-orange colour that sets off the
black bandings and leaf tips. For this
reason it's one of my favourite broms
of all and an awesome sight to enjoy.

It grows mainly as an epiphyte in
the wild, so is a great candidate for

N. 'Skotak's Tiger' in Hawaii.
Photo: L. Vinzant
N. 'Skotak's Tiger' rosette.
Photo: G. Barclay
tree or stump mounting in full sun
and growing it hard. Unfortunately
the leaf colour we achieve on our
New Zealand clone is not as intense
and evenly orange as plants grown
in warmer and more humid climates.
Also the black bandings tend to be
less pronounced and more irregular
on our clone, and I have heard there
are also plants in Brazil that have
virtually no bandings. It therefore
appears we have one of the 'midrange' specimens banding wise, but we
can still achieve a great looking shark!

One of the other great attributes
Neoregelia 'Skotak's Tiger' has, is
the ability to pass on many of its
outstanding traits of size, shape, colour,
spines and zonated bandings when
used as a hybrid parent. However, one
thing it does not ever do is self-set its
own seed, or, to my knowledge, sport
variegated pups. Therefore it can only
be propagated by offsets and any 'Tiger
Variegated' plants you may see are
actually hybrids with almost certainly
Neoregelia carolinae (variegated) or
similar in the mix.

Chester Skotak and many other
hybridisers around the world have used
it to create a number of now famous
plants, such as Neoregelia 'Hannibal
Lector', 'Clarice' and 'Norman Bates'
to name a few, with many more new
variegated Skotak plants about to
become readily available. Peter Coyle,
Andrew Devonshire, John Lambert
and myself have also recently used it
extensively in our local hybridising
programmes with some excellent
results – so watch this space for our
own new 'Kiwi Sharks'!

20

 October 2014
VOL 54 NO 10
Lisa Vinzant's nursery in Hawaii Photo: Peter Waters
Racinaea

Learning about the genera : Racinaea
V

This is a genus of 75 species
formerly included in Tillandsia
but separated out in 1993 by
Lyman B Smith and Michael Spencer
and given their own genus, Racinaea
In Tillandsia

Racinaea crispa U

subgenus V and differed
from other tillandsias by the shape of
their sepals They had a rather weird
shape being assymetric and broadest
near the apex Their habitat is centred
on Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and

varV

Venezuela, although there are a few
in Central America, West Indies and
Brazil The name Racinaea honours
Racine, the wife of Mulford Foster

Many are rainforest inhabitants and
don't take kindly to cultivation, but
there are a few that are in collections
because of their unusual leaf formation

they need to be treated as tillandsias,
some needing warmth during winter as
they are not frost tolerant The species
that are at present being grown in New
Zealand, are as follows:

Racinaea adscendens is a medium
sized tillandsia-like plant with stiff
green leaves and dark base The

because it is not that attractive when in

Racinaea crispa is a small crinkled
leaf plant no more than 10cm high

of orange bracts and yellow petals

stand it in a saucer of water

Racinaea fraseri is a large, green
leaved plant which has a large

bracts and white petals It grows as a
terrestrial in Colombia and Ecuador
Quite spectacular and easy to grow in
New Zealand

D also has an

and yellow or red bracts It comes in
three varieties and has been around for

these days

Racinaea pugiformis is another plant
with plain tillandsia-like leaves, like
, and until it produces its

identify Grows readily in Auckland

Racinaea tetrantha has seven
varieties, about 20cm in size The most
common variety D produces
a beautiful orange and yellow pendant

Some other species have been in New
Zealand, but have probably succumbed
due to cultivation problems They
are , pendulispica,
and

Do you have a
Society monthly
competition trophy?

Please return to our
October monthly meeting
so we can prepare them
to present to this year's
winners in November

Thanks

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – October 2014 issue

CONTENTS
Learning about the genera: Peter Waters on Racinaea 2
President's Page – Graeme Barclay 5
Bromeliad Society September meeting news 6
'Special Species Spotlight' – Graeme Barclay 8
'Bromeliads in Paradise' – World Bromeliad Conference – Diana Holt 11
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 15
Getting the best out of your tillandsias – Lester Ching 16
Group News 17
'Kiwi Bromeliads Open Day' – photos 19

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 17 for details of group meeting

times and venues

OCTOBER
26th Northland Group meeting
28th Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, starting at 730pm
The Monthly Choice competition:
Vriesea spotted plants Andrew Maloy
will present photos from the September
2014 BSI World Conference held in
Hawaii, followed by more photos from
Queensland presented by Graeme
Barclay

NOVEMBER

2nd South Auckland Group meeting
9th Tillandsia Group meeting
12th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
19th Bay of Plenty Group garden visits
25th Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden and
Windmill roads, starting at 730pm The
Monthly Choice competition: Christmas
plant arrangements
We will be presenting our monthly
competition trophies and also running
our annual plant auction This will be
followed by our Christmas supper
Please bring a plate!

FRONT COVER: Peter Waters took this photo of Lisa Vinzant's exotic looking
nursery at Waimanalo, Hawaii during the World Bromeliad Conference in
September There's a conference report by Diana Holt and more photos starting on
page 11

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Hello everyone,

Well, what a great Open Day we just
had at Kiwi Bromeliads! The weather
played its part and the showers stayed
away, bringing around 200 members
throughout the day from all around the
North Island to this much anticipated
event The doors opened at 1000am

and hordes of keen buyers flooded

in to be met by a fantastic range
of Kiwi foliage vrieseas and many
other varieties of broms put up for
sale by six other Society growers
We had members from all our regional
bromeliad groups arrive, some in
buses, others sharing cars – and all
going home happy with boot loads
full of wonderful broms! We also
had a dozen rare plants up for silent
auction A few achieved good prices
with one stunning pink Kiwi vriesea
going for over $600! Other than the
buying, it was a great chance to see
how a world-class bromeliad nursery
is set-up and some of the special
plants used for breeding I know many
members enjoyed the opportunity –
so a special thank you to Andrew and
Rhonda Maloy and Peter and Jocelyn
Coyle for making the day possible and
opening their greenhouses For those
that couldn't make it, I hope you enjoy
the photos!

I'm also delighted to let you know we
had a great sales turnover for a one
day sale, that will amount to a healthy

boost of funds for our Society to keep
producing the Journal and running our
'Fiesta' show and sale each year On
behalf of Andrew and Rhonda and all
the other sellers and BSNZ committee

– a BIG THANK YOU to all the
buyers and also to all the extra helpers
on the day for making it such a success
Now the weather has warmed up
nicely, I'm sure we'll see some
excellent plants tabled – and hopefully
a few more members too – at our last
two Auckland meetings of the year Do
check out your 'spotty vrieseas' (both
species and hybrids are allowed) and
bring along your best to enter in our
monthly choice section on October
28th

We will also have what I'm sure will
be a fantastic PowerPoint presentation,
with some amazing photos of a number
of member's brom experiences in
Hawaii for the recent BSI conference
and in Australia at the Queensland
garden expo This is a not-to-bemissed
meeting, so get the early dinner
sorted and book the babysitter now!

Lastly, if you have a Society monthly
competition trophy or end-of-year
award trophy, please bring it to the
October meeting so we can have them

ready for our November final prize

giving

Cheers,

Graeme Barclay

Bromeliad Society September

Meeting News Q

President Graeme Barclay
welcomed everyone He
mentioned that we had had a
hailstorm through some suburbs last
weekend and hoped that member's
plants had not suffered He thanked
people who write articles for the journal
noting that we are always looking for
more He reminded members that the
'Kiwi Bromeliads Open Day Sale' at
Andrew and Rhonda Maloy's is on
Sunday 12th of October

If anyone wants boxes of plant labels,
(1000 in a box), please contact Lester

to purchase plastic pots in NZ however
Graeme has sorted out a supplier and
hopes to bring some sample pots along
to the next meeting to see if members
are interested in purchasing them

Graeme also chaired the discussion on
the 'Show and Tell' plants There were
three tillandsia plants on the table – the

not opened yet and the plant could not

species V that had

if the surface had been rubbed away
No one knew what would cause this
damage Lastly for display was the
species V with

spike

Following this Lester Ching gave an
informative talk on growing tillandsias

The door prizes went to Carolle Roberts,
Graeme Barclay and Gene Dillman

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First was Graeme
Barclay with Quesnelia 'Tim Plowman'

– an attractive clump of plants with

with Also in the
competition were 'Covata',
D (dark form), 'Aztec Gold',
'Gold Tones';'Black' and
'Smokey Rose'

Open Foliage:

with D (albomarginated) – a most attractive plant
purchased in Australia Second was
David Goss with a very large D
'Kiwi' – D hybrid Also
in the competition was a clump of
'Marble Throat'

Tillandsia:

with He was also
second with a Also
on the table were ,
'Druid', , ,
and
x

Neoregelia: First Peter Coyle with
D 'Lime and Lava' a lovely
coloured plant that also deservedly
took 'Plant of the Month' Second was
Lester Ching with D 'Big Star'
x 'Big Boy' Also in the competition
were 'Pink Volcano', 'Chili
Verde', ampullacea x D and 'Tiger
Cub' x ampullacea

Named Monthly Plant (Tillandsia NEXT MEETING: Tuesday 28th
): First was Lynette Nash with October
a most attractive clump of Tillandsia

PS If you have a Society monthly
full blooms trophy at home please bring it back

to the October meeting so we can get
The Plant of the Month went to Peter it ready to present at our November
Coyle with D 'Lime and Lava' meeting
Congratulations to all the winners

From the Society's September meeting...

(albo-marginated)
(Peter Coyle) First in open foliage section (Lynette Nash)
First in named monthly plant section(Tillandsia aeranthos)
'Lime and Lava' (Peter Coyle)
First in neoregelia section and 'Plant ofthe Month'
Quesnelia'Tim Plowman' (Graeme

'Big Star x 'Big Boy' (Lester
Ching) Second in neoregelia section
(David Anderson)
First in tillandsia section

8
Vriesea 'Sons
of Tiger Tim'
PHOTO: P TRISTRAM

PHOTO: P TRISTRAM
Vriesea 'Tiger Tim' x Vriesea
seedling
PHOTO: G BARCLAY

PHOTO: P TRISTRAM

By Graeme Barclay
(and Peter Tristram)
With our Open Day / Sale in October at Kiwi Bromeliads there has been a lot
of focus on vrieseas so it seems very much in keeping this month to look at the
stories of two outstanding vriesea species cultivars:

Vriesea ospinae var gruberi and Vriesea 'Tiger Tim'

B

Like all great plants there's often a
story behind the name Back in the late
'80s a magic new variety of
H was written up in the BSI
Journal by Harry Luther What a plant
Needless-to-say, I went on a mission
to try to locate some I soon contacted
Harry, who I regularly discussed

contact Franz Gruber in Colombia –
the man the cultivar was eventually
named after as
This made sense, as I had often
purchased plants from Franz in the USA
and I also contacted Dennis Cathcart at

must have been reading my mind as
he indicated he was also getting in
a shipment of this new 'bromeliad
wonder' from Franz, so I started the

ball rolling to get in on this opportunity

Eventually about 150 plants arrived
in Sydney and were promptly gassed
with methyl bromide To my horror and
disbelief, this treatment (which is still
used today in some cases) resulted in
about 50% of these treasures dying and
many near fatalities One of the near-todeath plants was an absolute stand-out,
with a very white background to the
glyphs on the leaves I nursed it, upside
down, for a couple of months and it
eventually produced a single pup After

plant of what I originally called D
'White Windows', not a registered
name but simply a descriptor

My son, Tim, was a bit of a wild boy and
was affectionately called 'Timmy Tiger'
or 'Tiger Tim' by my family, especially
by my father At that time, in the mid
'90s, I was registering many plants
that were distinctive (mainly Skotak
neoregelias that I had also imported) so
I decided to register it and honour my
son with this spectacular plant from the
wilds of Amazonian Colombia Despite
the plant's near death from the nasty
gassing that took out so many of its
siblings, it grew well, proved very cold

with some outstanding results Some

Cont'd from P9 – Special Species Spotlight

of the grex seedlings were sold by
Greenstock Nursery, all over Australia,
as I had shared the seed with Bruce
Dunstan who worked with the company
at the time I named a group of the
whitest seedlings 'Sons of Tiger Tim'
One spectacular clone was smudged
and named 'Smudge Grub' and another
was variegated and is being further
developed to hopefully stabilise this
feature So the progeny live on too
Some distinctive clones from the grex
have also been named by other growers
There is still only one Vriesea 'Tiger
Tim' though, all being pups from that
original plant, which originated in
the wilds of Colombia I thank Franz
Gruber for introducing it to horticulture!

I recently visited Franz's nursery,
Bromelias De Colombia, in Fusagasuga,
down the range from Bogota on the
edge of the Magdalena Valley He is sort
of retired these days and the nursery is
very ably run by his children, Juan
and Patricia Over a few refreshing
Colombian beers we discussed many

things including the magnificent Vriesea
ospinae var gruberi One day I would

like to try to find it in nature, though the

area isn't safe yet and its habitat is likely
cleared now At least many clones made
it into horticulture assuring its survival
outside of its habitat The exciting
thing is that Juan Gruber has been busy
selectively breeding plants too, so many

more amazing forms will likely find

their way into the nursery trade soon

Different clones of Vriesea ospinae
var gruberi vary in cold tolerance,
some easily coping with temperatures
to near frost, like Vriesea 'Tiger Tim',
and others dying in colder weather
Tiger Tim's seedlings were cold-hardy
too Being a terrestrial, they prefer

a larger pot and plenty of water and
fertiliser, though the best markings can
be produced as the fertiliser runs out
(probably the nitrogen component)
A well grown 'gruberi' can be around
50cm diameter and can develop a stem
up to 50cm tall, which can be cut off
to produce basal pups while the top is
replanted They only produce roots in
warm weather and prefer bright light,
including direct sun at times, though
not during the middle hours of the day
in Summer, when they can suffer
sunburn They always pup from the

leaves next to the inflorescence and can
be easily cut or snapped out once firm at

the base, with some of the leaves split
back to expose the bases of the pups
They will also pup again from further
down the rosette A well grown and
fed plant with a large root system can
easily produce over ten pups A large
clump of ten or more heads can easily
be propagated too, an awesome display!

Graeme Barclay's footnote: Thanks to
Peter for a great article As a follow-
on, a few years ago some Australian
hybridisers crossed Vriesea 'Tiger Tim'
with clones of Vriesea ospinae var
gruberi – and also the reverse cross too,
with Vriesea 'Tiger Tim' as the pollen
parent These crosses have produced
many offspring with varied colouration
and leaf patterns though, as you would
expect, they are all similar looking and
their flowers will be near identical, due
to their species genes of Vriesea ospinae
only being involved While Vriesea
'Tiger Tim' still remains a rarity here,
plants from both crosses above are now
readily available in New Zealand and
will be excellent garden plants So now
you know the full history, keep your eye
out for them!

WoRlD BRoMElIAD CoNFERENCE 2014...
'Bromeliads in Paradise'

– Article by Diana Holt
Diana was one of a small group of kiwis who attended the BSI World Conference in
Hawaii in September and she filed this personal report for us

It certainly was 'paradise' for me
arriving in Hawaii to the wonderful
warmth after the cold and wet days
of Auckland The conference was held
at the Ala Moana Hotel, alongside the
Ala Moana Shopping Centre – four
levels, 450 shops with stairs, escalators
and elevators everywhere It took me a
while to find my way around but I did
manage to get in a little'retail therapy'
and exploring before the conference
started This area is just north of Waikiki
and only a short bus ride from the heart
of the tourist area and main beach

I was last in Honolulu ten years ago
and the growth of new hotels in
Waikiki is amazing, the palms seem to
have got bigger and there are so many
more people I am not sure how many
attended the conference, but I think
someone said 250 people, coming from
South Africa, Philippines, Thailand,
Australia, New Zealand, Bahamas and
from many states of America

DAY 1 – WEDNESDAY

Awelcoming Hawaiian Song of greeting
along with the opening speeches started

the day then onto the five one hour talks

scheduled

First up was Geoff Lawn, BSI Cultivar
Registrar – 'BSI Bromeliad Cultivar
Register' Geoff spoke of the reason

for such a register, the history, how to
register a new plant and how to access
the register

Alan Herndon from Tradewinds
Tropicals – 'Shades of Chantinii' Alan
spoke of the very strong demands for
this plant and the great variety of new
clones into the market place along with
the many variations in leaf colour and
banding patterns This is a very hard
plant to grow successfully in NZ unless
one has special facilities to keep it
warm

Nigel Thomson from Dandaloo Valley
Nursery – 'The Good, the Bad, or
the Ugly' Those attending the 'Cool
Broms' conference in Auckland last
year will remember this talk but this
time he didn't dance! Mostly he spoke
about various methods to fertilise and
whether or not to fertilise

Andy Siekkinen from Eagle Eye
Adventures – 'The Bromeliads of
Oaxaca' (pronounced 'Wa-haka')
Oaxaca is located in southern Mexico
and due to the wide diversity of low
lands, dry forests, mountains, canyons
and deserts means there is a very wide
range of bromeliads there

Pamela Koide-Hyatt from Bird Rock
Tropicals – 'Tillandsia, Natural,

Artificial and Accidental Pamela has

Cont'd P12 11

World Bromeliad Conference 2014... 'Bromeliads in Paradise'

been working for more than 30 years
with Tillandsia and spoke in depth on
the subject

by bus for a Hawaiian evening at the
Willows Restaurant for an excellent
meal of Hawaiian style food and a
chance to catch up with friends in
beautiful surroundings of palms and
ponds

DAY 2 – THURSDAY

Tour day In the morning, we all headed
off to Lyon Arboretum in the hills
Developed by Harold Lyon in 1931
and now managed by the University
of Hawaii, it covers many acres that
would take a good day to explore all
the walking tracks We only had about
an hour so most of us headed up to the
bromeliad area

The afternoon was a bus tour around
Downtown Honolulu including a stop at
the palace of the last King of Hawaii,
now the courthouse In the evening the
Plant Sale and Display area was opened
for all the Conference attendees There
was the usual big rush and buying spree

night and within half an hour her four
tables were almost cleaned out!

DAY 3 – FRIDAY

The morning was spent on a couple
more talks First a discussion led by Jay
Thurrott (President, BSI International)
and Alan Herndon (Editor of Bromeliad
Society Journal) The topic was 'Lets
Discuss the Journal and Website' It
gave a chance for good discussion...
how effective they are... room for
improvement Some good points raised

The next talk 'Bromeliads – Hawaiian
Style, A Roundtable Discussion with
Peter De Milo, David Fell, Sharon
Petersen, David Shiigi and Lisa Vinzant
Each spoke about their hybridising
and showed slides Peter De Milo,
Tillandsia; David Fell, Vriesea; Sharon
Pederson, Neoregelia; Liza Vinzant,
mostly Neoregelia, some Bilbergia;
David Shiigi, Vriesea and Neoregelia
All were most interesting to listen to
David Shiigi is also a chef so many
suggestions were offered about him
cooking our dinner!

After lunch it was back to the buses
to go and visit David Fell and Sharon
Pederson at their nurseries in the
Waimanalo area (Windward Oahu) In
both there were vast tables full of many
beautiful plants overlooked by the
high mountain range with hang gliders
drifting on the wind currents above the
ridges With the beautiful lush tropical
foliage all around and lots of warm
sunshine you really felt you were in
paradise

DAY 4 – SATURDAY

Many headed off to the Dole Plantation
and Polynesian Centre but I wanted to go
out to the Farmers Market at Diamond
Head to see a hibiscus hybridiser I knew
and then on to Foster Botanical Garden
located in Honolulu Approximately a
mile square, this garden is home to a
collection of rare and beautiful plants
from the tropicas I used local buses that
are cheap and run regularly around the
city

Saturday evening was the time for the
Banquet and Rare Plant Auction The
meal was a bit rushed as they wanted
to get to the Auction Around the walls

Vriesea at David Fell's
PHOTO: PETER WATERS
Tillandsia display by Peter de Mello
PHOTO: PETER WATERS
Andrew Coote at
David Fell's nursery
at Waimanalo
PHOTO: DIANA HOLT
were silent auctions of many things
besides plants There were some good
plants including a number of special
tillandsias up for auction with some
very spirited bidding As there were
a number going to the Big Island the
following day with a 500am start,
there were not many left in the room by
900pm

DAY 5 – SUNDAY

At 500am, two busloads headed to the

Big Island to be greeted by our coach
for the day First stop was at David
Fell's home to view both his nursery
and beautiful landscaped gardens It was
then on to David Shiigi's nursery and
then his home Time did not allow a full
search of the thousands of plants there
but what we saw was very interesting
Hilo is close to the volcanic activity
After visiting the two nurseries we were
taken to the Kilauea Visitor's Centre
overlooking a huge smouldering crater
surrounded by miles of bare volcanic
rock then on to the Thurston Lava Tube

13

World Bromeliad Conference 2014... 'Bromeliads in Paradise'

Tillandsia house at Sharon Petersen's Hawaiian Bromeliad Society display
Vriesea 'Gold Fellow' David Fell
'Golden Idol'
Sharon Petersen
MORE PHOTOS BY PETER WATERS...
where we walked through a natural lava
tunnel then through bush very similar to
our own

Between the visit to nurseries and the
volcanic area, our bus decided to give
us our own little adventure Rolling
along the highway, we were suddenly
overtaken by our own wheels as they
came off one side of the bus! Luckily

for a replacement bus but great laughter

all around as we enjoyed hanging out
on the side of the road... a great way to
meet the locals

14

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters

Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451
David Cowie 09-630 8220
Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Sandy Stonham 09-627 9658
Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $3500 ($500 discount if paid before the end of February)
Dual membership (same household) NZ $4500 ($500 discount also applies as above)

Overseas:

NZD $4500 Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

PO Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
waterspj@ihugconz

Deadline:

Tuesday of publication month

Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $6000
Half Page $3000
Quarter Page $1500

'Buy & Swap'

Listings in 'Buy & Swap' are FREE for
members of the Society (max 30 words)
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: mathiesonmarketing@xtraconz

Getting the bestout of your tillandsias

At the Society's September monthly meeting Lester Ching gave an informative
talk on looking after tillandsias Here, in summary form are key points from
Lester's talk

LIGHT

Tillandsias need high to direct
sunlight May to October to generate
photosynthesis to enable the plants to
grow strong During November to April

they like more filtered light, as our sun

can burn the plants The way I look at
it is, 'if I burn the tillandsias can burn
too' The 'green leaf' tillandsias are
especially prone to burning Summer
greenery on trees can provide too much
shade and without enough light the

tillandsias may suffer and not flower

WATER

Wet your tillandsias two to three times
a week, less often in the cool of winter,
under 5ºC In the summer months,
water more often, depending on where
they are kept In a glasshouse, where
it is more humid, or in a shade house,
even outside more watering is required
Importantly, tillandsias need to dry out
within 4 hours of watering or they can
rot

AIR CIRCULATION

This is very important so plants can dry
out and minimise pest problems

FERTILISER

Fertiliser can be used in granule form
for potted 'green leaf' tillandsias and/
or in water soluble form at 20% of
recommended doses Remember – all
tillandsias feed through the leaves,
and some through the roots as well
and over fertilising can damage your

plant Better to liquid feed with weaker
solutions more often Liquid fertilisers
are best used Spring and Summer to
March Tillandsias will not absorb
much in the way of nutrients in cold
months Fertilisers used for air plants:
Blossom Booster 3-18-27 to bring the

plants into flower Plant Fol 20-20-20 to

provide leaf growth and roots

TEMPERATURE

A favourable temperature range for
tIllandsias is 10ºC to 35ºC

MOUNTING

You can mount your plants on almost

anything that is firm eg scoria, cork,

ponga, driftwood, seashells, coral,
crystals, rock (be careful of burning!)
by using a water based glue eg 'NO
MORE NAILS', tie and/or staple plants
until glue dries Note: petroleum based
glue will kill the plant

TERRARIUMS

I fear not best suited for tillandsias
as they cannot sit in water and they
also need air movement, watering and
enough light to generate photosynthesis

without burning However my final

judgement is still out on terrariums until
I have seen the long term effects

Enjoy your growing of tillandsias
and if you have any questions,
please contact Lester by email –
bevandlester@xtraconz

Group News

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Jo Elder
Our President Lynley is away and Kevin
Pritchard very ably ran our September
meeting and welcomed 49 members and
three visitors Roger Allan gave us a
very interesting PowerPoint presentation
about his visit to both the Singapore
Botanical Gardens and the new 'Gardens
by the Bay' The government had wanted
to call Singapore the 'Garden City' but
now call it 'The City in the Gardens' He
spoke about the enormous domes and the
wonderful gardens and encouraged us to
travel there and visit

Plant of the Month – Aechmea:

1st Kevin Pritchard with Aechmea
'Ensign', 2nd Gill Keesing with Aechmea
'Xavante' 3rd equal Kevin Pritchard
with Aechmea 'Burgundy' and Colin
Sutherland with Aechmea 'Covata' also
tabled was Aechmea 'Lucky Stripes'

Novice Section: 1st Diana Fiford with
Neoregelia 'Predator', 2nd Manual
Lafaele with Aechmea pectinata

Open Competition: 1st Kevin Pritchard
with Vriesea 'Highway Beauty', 2nd
equal Graham Alabaster with Neoregelia
'Manoa Beauty' and Jo Elder with
Neoregelia 'Break of Day', 3rd equal
Graham Alabaster with Neoregelia
'Gold Fever' and Kevin Pritchard with
Aechmea 'Ensign Reverse'

Tillandsia Competition: 1st Bertha
Schollum with Tillandsia ionantha,
2nd equal Audrey Hewson with Tillandsia

recurvifolia var subsecundifolia

and Kevin Pritchard with Tillandsia
meridionalis (recurvifolia), 3rd Jo

Elder with Tillandsia fasciculata var
densispica also tabled T tenuifolia (blue)
and erubescens

Kevin spoke about how he had kept
his plants warm during the winter and
answered many questions about the plants
being shown and about dividing plants
It was decided that a demonstration of
dividing vrieseas would be held at our
November meeting

Next Meeting: Wednesday November
12th at 1230pm at the Yacht Club
Speaker; Lynley Breeze who will show
photos of a visit to Hidcote and Kifsgate
Court gardens in the Cotswolds, UK
There will also be a discussion on the
'Elms' in Tauranga

Garden visits: Wednesday November
19th starting at 1000am 1 Maisie
Kokshoorn, 21 Bridgewater Way, The
Lakes 2 Instead of a second garden we
will visit the Garden and Art Festival
pavilion at the Lakes

Tillandsia Group

– Lester Ching
On a fine but cool day, 13 members

gathered to discuss the display plants
and hear Lester talk on several of his
tillandsias Thanks to all those who
brought displays along to be judged
Members then looked at the tillandsias in
two shadehouses, racks of tillandsias in
the garden, the glass house and the sales
area We welcomed Win Shorrock and
Leanne Hoskings along and both enjoyed
the meeting During the afternoon, we
shared a lot of information on caring for
and growing tillandsias

Cont'd P18 17

Cont'd from P17 – Group News

Next Meeting: Sunday November 9th
at Margaret and Robert Flanagan's, 120
Flanagan Road, Drury Enquiries: please
call Lester Ching 576 4595 evenings

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Sandra Wheeler
On a fine and sunny spring afternoon

we met for our September meeting at
Don Nicholson's beautifully maintained
garden Jan welcomed 34 members and
thanked Don for his hospitality

Maureen brought along a number of
superb variegated and marginated
bromeliads from her collection
Macgregor Smith talked about these
plants and told us that the word variegata
comes from the Latin word variegatus
meaning variable colouration with
patches of different colours These may
be bands, dots, lines or streaks caused by
the green chlorophyll-containing tissues
and the albino tissues Marginata means
that leaf margins are white with green
centres

A large number of these bromeliads are
progeny of Neoregelia carolinae

Members may like to google 'variegation

in bromeliads' where you will find

an excellent page at 'Jacks Florida
Bromeliads'

Many thanks to Maureen and Mac who
can always be relied upon to provide us
with an interesting subject for discussion

'Show and Tell' Competition:

1st Lew Panther – Vriesea 'Highway
Beauty', 2nd equal Pat Vendt – Neoregelia
'Vivacor' x 'Roseo Striata' and Joy
Barnes – Neoregelia 'Fall in Love'

Next Meeting: Sunday 26th October
130pm at Sandra's garden, 410 Crane
Road, Kauri

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
We had a very good October meeting
despite the fact that our guest speaker,
Russell Hutton, let us down at the
last minute but we understand that
he is having an Open Day at Labour
Weekend Members were therefore
given the option of visiting Gardenza at
the end of the meeting as David Brundell
is having a closing down sale Marie
Healey reminded members of our trip
to Matakana on 9th November and that
there are still a few seats available for
anyone interested, and also our trip to
Hamilton Gardens on 1st March 2015

For our skite plants, Judy Graham
brought along a Neoregelia 'Painted
Delight'; Marie Healey an Aechmea
orlandiana 'Ensign'; Norma Cook a
beautiful display of tillandsias; Margaret
Flanagan a Neoregelia macwilliamsii,
and Marion Morton a Tillandsia
recurvifolia var subsecundifolia, and a
Tillandsia tenuifolia hybrid

The monthly raffle winners were

Kathleen Carter, Marion Morton and
Tris Wakelyn, and the auction plant was
won by Norma Cook

Next Meeting: Sunday, 2nd November
in the Friends House at the Auckland
Botanic Gardens commencing at 1:30pm
Our guest speaker will be Martin Walker
from Coromandel Cacti Limited

For those that couldn't make it to Kiwi Bromeliads in
Whenuapai on October 12th, here are some hot-off-thepress shots of what you missed out on There was a
fantastic range of plants for sale and large garden areas
around the residence planted with many beautiful foliage
vrieseas, alcantareas and spring colour Read more
about the day in the President's report on page 5 – we
hope you enjoy the photos

PHOTOS By GrAeMe BArCLAy, MurrAy MATHieSON AND DAVe ANDerSON

19More photos on P20

20

 September 2014VOL 54 NO 9
Learning about the large and diverse Aechmea genus.
Aechmea caesia. Photo: Graeme Barclay

Edmundoa update – Graeme Barclay

In our June 2014 Journal we looked at the medio-picta variegated and
albo-marginated forms of Edmundoa lindenii var. lindenii that were both
registered under the same name as Edmundoa 'Alvim Seidel'. The BSI
Registrar, Geoff Lawn, has recently decided to create a new name for the
centrally variegated clone to prevent ongoing confusion. Hence, this plant
is now registered as Edmundoa 'Brazil', while the albo-marginated form
retains the name Edmundoa 'Alvim Seidel'.

Please change your name tags NOW to reflect this change.

While on the subject, in the June article I also asked whether anyone had a
variegated Edmundoa lindenii var. rosea (with rose coloured inflorescence)
growing in New Zealand or Australia. It turns out this plant is actually
grown in Australia, albeit quite rare, but I have not heard of it making it to
New Zealand as yet. It will also likely receive a cultivar name of its own in
the future after origin and details are confirmed, so it is not confused with
the white flowered Edmundoa 'Brazil'.

Edmundoa 'Brazil'. Photo: Kerry Tate.

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – September 2014 issue

CONTENTS
An Edmundoa with a new name – Graeme Barclay 2
President's Page – Graeme Barclay 4
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 5
Bromeliad Society August meeting news – Dave Anderson 6
'Special Species Spotlight' – Graeme Barclay 8
Group News 11
'Kiwi Bromeliads Open Day' update 13
The Hybridising Journey – Andrew Devonshire 14
Learning about the genera: Peter Waters on Aechmea 17

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 11 for details of group meeting

times and venues.

SEPTEMBER

23rd Society monthly meeting at

Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden and
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The
Monthly Choice competition: Tillandsia
aeranthos. Lester Ching will talk on
tillandsias.
28th Northland Group meeting

OCTOBER

5th South Auckland Group meeting
8th Bay of Plenty Group meeting

12th OPEN DAY at Kiwi Bromeliads,
Whenuapai, Auckland. See page 13 for
full details.

19th Eastern BOP meeting
28th Society monthly meeting at

Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden and
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The
Monthly Choice competition: Vriesea

– spotted plants. Andrew Maloy will
present photos from the September
2014 BSI World Conference being held
in Hawaii, followed by more photos
from Queensland presented by Graeme
Barclay.
FRONT COVER: Graeme Barclay supplied the photo of the attractive flowering
Aechmea caesia for our cover. Starting on page 17, Peter Waters takes on the daunting
task of 'making sense' of the large, diverse and somewhat confusing Aechmea genus

– with its 259 species, currently grouped into 8 subgenera.

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Hello everyone,

On Sunday 24th August, I had the
pleasure of being invited to speak at the
Northland Bromeliad Group's monthly
meeting in Whangarei. It was a lovely
weekend weather-wise and great to
see a healthy number of members
enjoying their monthly get-together.
It was interesting for me to see how
other groups run 'brom things', being
the first meeting outside of Auckland
I've been able to attend. I hope the
members enjoyed and got something
out of my ramblings and photo
presentations, as much as I enjoyed
delivering it and meeting everyone on
the day. Special thanks to Jan, Colin and
McGregor for organising things so well.

Whilst on the subject of meetings, it
was also great to see a much better turnout at our August meeting in Auckland
last month. Over 50 people were in
attendance, which is pretty good for a
winter month. We also had a fantastic
'double-banger' raffle with two great

plants and lots of participation –

special thanks to Sandy Stonham for

organizing that and selling plenty of

tickets. I look forward to seeing more
of you coming along to join in as the
nights begin to warm up.

Plans are almost finalised for the
Open Sale Day coming up on Sunday
October 12th at Kiwi Bromeliads.
I hear there are quite a number of
buses and car-convoys coming from
out of town with members from many
of the regional bromeliad groups.
It's sure to be an excellent day, with
plenty of fun and 'new releases'
for sale from all of the growers.

Finally a friendly reminder again to

all our affiliated regional bromeliad
groups to please consider sending

in a few photos and a short story to

go with them of any of your coming
garden visits, member's collections or
meetings. Even photos of competition
plants or unique and unusual show-
and-tell specimens from one of your

monthly meetings is perfect for

inclusion in our monthly Journal.
It's great for others around the country
to see exactly what you grow and
how well you are growing it! We are
always looking for Journal material,
however large or small, so please
get your fingers clicking on those

cameras and simply email any photos

and text directly to Murray our editor
at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Many thanks in advance!

Cheers,

Graeme Barclay

For all the details about the Kiwi Bromeliads 'Open Day',
including detailed driving instructions, please go to page 13
in this Journal.

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters

Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451
David Cowie 09-630 8220
Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Sandy Stonham 09-627 9658
Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month

Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

'Buy & Swap'

Listings in 'Buy & Swap' are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Bromeliad Society August

Meeting News – Notes and photos by Dave Anderson

Graeme Barclay chaired the

meeting and welcomed everyone

including two members from
Northland. Coming up in September
we have a talk on tillandsias by Lester
Ching and in October a PowerPoint
presentation from the BSI conference in
Hawaii and a talk from Graeme on his
recent trip to Australia. Then we have
the 'Open Day' coming up fast at Kiwi
Bromeliads on Sunday 12th October.

Peter Waters took us through the 'Show
and Tell' plants. First up this month was
a Vriesea fenestralis that had quite bad
quilling (looking like a soda straw).
Quilling is the 'cementing' of the leaves
caused by lack of good moisture while
the plant is in an active growing period.
If you have a plant that is quilling,
take a mild liquid detergent, and put
several drops into the tight centre cup
and fill it with water to overflowing.
This procedure should produce lots of
suds. The soapy water will dissolve the
hardened sticky substance and then with
the gentle use of a flat but blunt object,
such as a plant marker, the leaves may
be loosened from the outer-most to the
inner-most of the leaves around the quill.
Make sure after loosening the leaves that
all traces of the soapy water are flushed
off the leaves with lots of water.

Next, a plant that had lost its name
was identified as Billbergia 'Dulce' –
a hybrid made by Don Beadle. Lastly
there was a guzmania also wanting a
name. Unfortunately there are so many
guzmania hybrids that have been made
over the years it is impossible to identify
the plant further.

Peter Waters followed with a most

interesting PowerPoint presentation and

talk on the genus Aechmea.

The special raffle prizes this month were
won by Ed Foot and David Goss. The
door prizes went to Hazel Foot, John
Muddiman and Graeme Barclay.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First was Peter

Coyle with xCanmea 'Wild Tiger' –
this hybrid of Canistrum triangulare x
Aechmea fasciata shows the attractive
cross banding of its canistrum parent.
Mark Van Kaathoven was second with
Aechmea 'Mirlo' – a cv. of Aechmea
victoriana v. discolor(?) x orlandiana(?)
with upright rosette w/strappy copper-
amber leaves. Also in the competition

were Billbergia 'Gloria'; Aechmea
warasii and Vriesea 'Highway Beauty'.

Open Foliage: David Goss was first
with Aechmea chantinii – a lovely
clump of three plants. Second was David

Anderson with Aechmea mexicana

(albo-marginated). In the competition
were xCanmea 'Wild Leopard' F2;
Neoregelia 'Totara Twist'; xNeophytum
'Gary Hendrix'; Vriesea fosteriana (gold
form), Alcantarea vinicolor, Vriesea
'Dark Knight' x 'Snowman', 'Rafael'
and 'Chestnut Wave' hybrid.

Tillandsia: First was David Anderson

with Tillandsia ventanaensis and Lynette
Nash was second with a Tillandsia
hybrid. Other plants on the table were
Tillandsia flagellata, ionantha, ixioides,
montana, macropetala, and recurvifolia
var subsecundifolia.

Neoregelia: First Peter Coyle with made in 1998): First Peter Coyle with a
Neoregelia 'Blushing Zebra' and second beautiful red coloured plant. Alan Cliffe
was Graeme Barclay with Neoregelia was second.
'Wee Willy' x 'Skotaks Tiger'. Also in
the competition was Neoregelia 'Exotica The Plant of the Month went to David
Red Prince', 'Playball' x carcharodon Anderson with Aechmea mexicana
'Skotaks Tiger' and 'Screaming Tiger'. (albo-marginated).

Congratulations to all the winners.

Named Monthly Plant (Neoregelia
'Wild Tiger' – a Grace Goode hybrid NEXT MEETING: Tuesday 23rd Sep.

From the Society's August meeting...

Aechmea mexicana (albo-marginated)
(Dave Anderson). 'Plant of the Month'.
Aechmea chantinii (David Goss).
First in open foliage section.
xCanmea 'Wild Tiger (Peter Coyle).
First in open flowering section.
Neoregelia 'Blushing Zebra' (Peter
Coyle). First in neoregelia section.
Tillandsia ventanaensis (Dave Anderson).
First in tillandsia section.

To go with our 'Learning about the genera: Aechmea' article this month, we
examine two of the first variegated aechmea species cultivars.

Aechmea 'MEND' and Aechmea 'Alvarez'

Aechmea 'Alvarez'.
Photo: Graeme Barclay
Aechmea 'MEND'.
Photo: Kerry Tate
Both of these lovely variegates
originated from the species
Aechmea lueddemanniana,
which is widespread in Central
American countries from Mexico and
Guatelamala to Belize. It is part of
the subgenus Podaechmea, grows
mainly on rocks between 270-1200
metres altitude and was first named
in 1886 after French plant collector
Mr. G.A Lueddemann. It is closely
related to and often confused with
Aechmea mexicana that grows in
the same regions, as they both have
the same peachy-green coloured leaves
and whitish, cylindrical and slightly
pyramidal inflorescences. The easiest

differences to note when grown well in

New Zealand are, Aechmea mexicana
is a larger plant at around 75cm to 1
metre diameter with around 10-12cm
wide leaves, versus 45-60cm diameter
and 6-8cm wide leaves for Aechmea
lueddemanniana. Also, the flower
petals of Aechmea mexicana are lilac

to red and the inflorescence longer
and more robust, normally around
40-50cm in length, whereas Aechmea
lueddemanniana has rose and blue
petals, turning dark crimson and the
inflorescence length is shorter, around
10-25cm.

Once again, early seed propagation in
Florida USAwas responsible for the first
Aechmea lueddemanniana variegate
to appear. In 1960, Mr. Julian Nally
gave some Aechmea lueddemanniana
seed to Mr. Edward Ensign, who
duly sowed it and eventually some
very small seedlings were given
to Mr. Jean Merkel to grow on.
To his delight, a single albo-marginated
'mutant' arose amongst the normal
green seedlings and was nurtured to
maturity, revealing a stunning green
plant with bright pink margins.

After the first flowering (which
confirmed it to be a true Aechmea
lueddemanniana) all eyes were on the
emerging pups, which mostly proved to
be stable clones of the mother, with the
same pink marginated rosettes. It was
eventually named Aechmea 'MEND'

which is an acronym derived from the
following names – (M) for Mildred,
Jean's wife, (E) for Mr. Ensign who
sowed the seed; (N) for Mr. Nally who
gave Ensign the seed; (D) in memory
of early bromeliad hybridiser Ralph
Davis, who encouraged Merkel to
propagate the plant. Aechmea 'MEND'
received an Award or Merit from the
Royal Horticultural Society of England
in the 1971 Chelsea Flower Show.

Another similar albo-marginated clone

is registered as Aechmea 'Rodco' that

supposedly came from Japan, possibly
ex Mexico originally. This is a slightly
different looking plant colour-wise,
with more striated leaves and while
difficult to tell apart, should not be
confused with Aechmea 'MEND'.
Self-set seed from Aechmea 'MEND'
will germinate and surprisingly for
an albo-marginated plant (which
would normally produce only albino
white seedlings that die very small)
two notable 'pinkish' plants have
been registered in the early 1980s
as Aechmea 'Aurora' and Aechmea
'Ballerina'. I have not heard of either
of these plants growing in New
Zealand to date.

The origin of the centrally variegated

form of Aechmea lueddemaniana is

somewhat more obscure. It was known
and commonly sold in the 1970s and
'80s as Aechmea lueddemanniana
'Medio-Picta'. Eventually, a plant was
registered in the BSI cultivar registry
as Aechmea 'Alvarez', where it states
it originated 'from wild collection' and

Cont'd P10

Cont'd from P9 – Special Species Spotlight

came from Brazil. This seems strange,
as we know Aechmea lueddemanniana
does not grow in Brazil, though it
is entirely possible nurseries there
obtained the plant elsewhere and
propagated it. By the late 1970s,
this plant made its way to Tropiflora
Nursery and others in Florida, where

it was offered for sale and the name

registered. Aechmea 'Alvarez' has a
wide, central, cream stripe down the
centre of each leaf that turns pink-
orange in high light, making a stunning
contrast with the olive-green leaf
margins.

As with Aechmea 'MEND' there
are also several other medio-picta
variegated registered cultivars,
namely Aechmea 'Pinkie', 'Blanca
Alvarez' and 'Rodco Inverta', which
was obviously a sport from the
albo-marginated Aechmea 'Rodco'.
It remains unclear how Aechmea
'Alvarez' got its name, or who exactly
named it. Also unclear is whether
variegated plants from countries such
as Mexico also made their way into
cultivation around the same time
that were eventually given the other
cultivar names Aechmea 'Pinkie'
and 'Blanca Alvarez' mentioned
above – and whether they originated
from plants known as Aechmea
lueddemanniana 'Medio-Picta'. So,

how many different clones are there

actually around? Like most variegates,
these plants have a tendency to throw
pups with varying types of variegation
and also plain green pups, so different
named cultivars are not surprising.

Being a species from the equatorial
regions and relatively low altitude,
both of these beautiful aechmeas are
not the easiest broms to grow outside

in New Zealand conditions.

They normally seem to need some
protection and extra warmth in the

winter months to prevent bad cold
spotting and leaf die-back on the lower
leaves. Hence, they are best kept in a
greenhouse or conservatory to keep
them looking their best, where they
can receive a lot of warmth, humidity
and light to allow the pink colours to
flourish and cold damage is minimised.

They will grow in the garden or as

epiphytes, as long as they are in a
sheltered area with plenty of light, but
under these conditions will normally
only attain a size of 30-40cm diameter,
versus 40-50cm when grown under
protection. I have also found they need

some slow release feeding in spring

and again in late summer to ensure
good form, larger size and health over
winter, so experimentation with this
to suit your growing conditions is
worthwhile to see if you can improve
how they look.

Group News

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
Orchid Group – Alison Iremonger

The August meeting was held at Ken and
Sue Laurent's home with 32 members and
visitors. Our meeting in September will
be replaced with a bus trip to Tauranga.
Jean Richardson from Tauranga is the
organiser and she gave a brief outline of
the places that were to be visited.

Ken Laurent then gave a very informative
talk with photos on the releasing of the
North Island robin. A group had travelled
to Mokoia Island, Rotorua, to capture the
robins. They were then released in the
scenic reserve at Ohope. An interesting
insight into the dedication of this group
trying to save the North Island robin.

Raffles were drawn and then the members
went for a walk around Ken and Sue's
lovely garden including that of 'Bubbles'
Rivetts (Sue's Mum) next door. The
orchids growing in the bush and the mass
of bromeliads were stunning. We had a
sales table. To fill the afternoon Jacqui
and Nell Israelson opened their colourful,
compact garden. Thank you to Ken, Sue,
Jacqui and Nell. We finished up at the
Robert Harris café for afternoon tea and
a good chat.

Next Meeting: 19th October. Visitors are
always welcome to our meetings.Contacts

– Maureen Moffatt 07-322 2276; Ross
Fergusson 07-312 5487; Sue Laurent 07307 1323.
Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Lynley Breeze
Lynley welcomed members and visitors to
the meeting and advised that Matua Hall
is booked for our display and sales day Sat

29th November, 8am – 12pm. There will
be no garden visits in October but there is
great interest in our bus trip to the 'KIWI
Bromeliads Open Day' in Auckland 12th
October. (Cost per person $40.00).

Our guest speaker, John Beech, the
organiser of the New Zealand Garden
and Arts Festival 2014, spoke about the
programme. This year will be the 18th
Festival and the 9th programme. It will be
held 17th – 23rd November . It is run as a
charitable trust and gives $100 vouchers
to be donated to the charity of choice by
each of the gardeners. Last year they gave
$6,000 to charity. Most events there will
be free of charge. There will be sculptures,
water features, exhibitions, speakers and
the public are encouraged to come out and
picnic. Sponsorship is required and much
appreciated.

There were seven lucky raffle winners.

Plant of the Month – Vriesea: 1st Helen

and Dean Morman – Vriesea 'Cosmic
Jewel', 2nd Gill Keesing – Vriesea
'Waihi Dawn' and 3rd Colin Sutherland –
'Poelmanni Selecta'. There were a lovely
selection of vrieseas tabled including
'Vistarella', fosteriana (rubra), fenestralis,
and 'Snowman'.
Novice Section: 1st Diana Fiford –
Neoregelia 'Exotic Velvet', 2nd Manuel
Lafaele – Neoregelia 'Aussie Dream" and
3rd Claire Martin – Neoregelia 'Orange
Crush'. It was very nice to see more
members entering the Novice competition.
Open Competition: 1st Helen and Dean
Morman – Vriesea 'Highway Beauty',
2nd Graeme Alabaster –Neoregelia
'Perfection' and 3rd Jo Elder – Neoregelia
'Small World'. Also tabled were Vriesea
'Vista', Vriesea 'Pacific Twilight',
Neoregelia 'Dark Knight' and Neoregelia
'Orange Crush'.

Cont'd P12 11

Cont'd from P11 – Group News

Tillandsia Competition: 1st Audrey
Hewson – Tillandsia ionantha, 2nd Jo Elder

– Tillandsia latifolia (small form) and 3rd
Jo Elder – Tillandsia duratii. Also tabled,
Tillandsia leonamiana, tectorum, 'Fat
Chance" recurvifolia var subsecundifolia.
Next Meeting: Wednesday 8th October in
the TYPB rooms at 12.30. Guest speaker
will be Hawi Winters. No plant of the
month.

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Sandra Wheeler
We had a good attendance at our August
meeting in the Reyburn House Studio.
Guest speaker, Bromeliad Society
of New Zealand president, Graeme
Barclay, presented a slide show of the
Neoregelia carcharodon plants. This was
a fascinating look at the huge variety of
colours and forms in this group. Graeme
also had photos of stunning Alcantarea
imperialis – many of which were huge
with variegated markings.

Competition:1st equal Pat Vendt –
Neoregelia 'Moonlight Lady' and Stacy
Ellison – Vriesea 'Highway Beauty',
2nd Jenny Coyne – Vriesea 'Vistarella'

Next Meeting: Sunday 28th September at
1.30pm at 42 Kamo Road, Whangarei.

Hawkes Bay Bromeliad Group

– Pieter Franklin and Julie Greenhill
Our latest meeting was held in St. John's
Hall Taradale and was attended by 19
people. We discussed having a stall at the
Saturday market to try and create interest
in broms and find new members. We
are still trying to entice speakers to our
meetings. Any offers appreciated!

A variety of ponga logs and kiwifruit
stumps were kindly supplied by Suzanne
Hampton and Linda Wong. Thanks to
everyone else for donating plants and
materials for a workshop which kept us
busy and tested our artistic skills.

Competition:
Flowering: 1st equal Yvonne Richardson
– Nidularium fulgens and Bill Young –
Aechmea caudata

Non-Flowering: 1st Bill Young –
Neoregelia 'True Love', 2nd Julie Greenhill

– Neoregelia 'Tiger' x 'Hannibal Lector'.
Tillandsia: 1st Pieter Franklin – Tillandsia
confertiflora, 2nd Pieter Franklin –
Tillandsia punctulata, 3rd Margaret Bluck
– Tillandsia stricta.
Miniatures: 1st Bill Young – Cryptanthus,
2nd Pieter Franklin – Neoregelia 'Small
World' x 'Red Planet', 3rd Julie Greenhill
– Neoregelia pauciflora.
South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
We had a beautiful day for Fathers Day
and our September meeting. Marie
Healey welcomed everyone including
our new members. Our guest speaker
was John Mitchell who talked to us
about hybridising and this was absolutely
fascinating. John brought along some
magnificent vrieseas that he had created
which were all to die for, and some of
which were not yet registered. It was
a stunning collection. Thank you John.
The monthly raffle of plants was won
by John Mitchell, Leanne Hosking and
Robert Flanagan and the special raffle by
Judy Graham.

Next Meeting: Sunday, 5th October in the
Plastic House at the Auckland Botanic
Gardens commencing at 1:30pm. Guest
speaker: Russell Hutton on orchids.

Open Day
Sunday October 12th, 10am to 3pm
Your hosts will be Andrew and Rhonda Maloy,
16 Riverlea Road, Whenuapai, Auckland. Phone (09) 416 3543
Don't miss this exciting bromeliad event!
•Open TO aLL MeMBeRS OF BROMeLIaD SOCIeTy OF nZ
• Plenty of vrieseas for sale, some only recently registered with BSI• A great range of other broms available from specialist growers
including – Peter and Jocelyn Coyle from Totara Waters,
Lester and Bev Ching, Diana Holt, Peter Waters and Di Timmins.
• Off road parking• Tea, coffee, sausage sizzle and toilet facilities• Silent auction of some rare and sought after broms• Kiwi Vriesea competition – bring along your best Kiwi Vriesea and
be in to win
• Bromeliad racing!!
• RafflesneXT MOnTH...
How to find Kiwi Bromeliads...
• Travelling from the southern motorway:
Follow signs for Helensville until reaching the roundabout at end of the North
western motorway, take third exit into Brigham Creek Road, then first left into
Totara Road, next left into Dale Road, next right is Riverlea Road.
• Travelling from north on the northern motorway:
Follow sign for Waitakere and along Constellation Drive to SH18 motorway.
Take Brigham Creek Road (Whenuapai) exit, go through two roundabouts and
under the motorway onto Brigham Creek Road, travel along past the RNZAF
air base (on the right), after the shops turn right into Totara Road, left into
Dale Road, right into Riverlea Road.
We will have signs showing which entrance for cars and mini-buses only. Large
buses will have to park in the street to unload then probably go down the road and
left into Rope Rd where there is very little passing traffic.

Neoregelia 'Pacific Maui'
Neoregelia 'Pacific Maui' x
Neoregelia 'Skotak's Tiger'
The Hybridising Journey

The Hybridising Journey

– Article and photos by Andrew Devonshire
Last month I profiled the process involved in creating the hybrid Neo.

'Kohawhero', a cross done in 2006 with correia-araujoi and 'Gold Fever'. Like
many hybridists, my compulsive tendencies dictate that I can never be content
with just one cross, so my correia-araujoi mother plant was set up with a number
of other pollen parents. I hope you enjoy reading part two in my 'journey'.

Aplant I definitely wanted to
use for this project was Neo.
'Barbarian'. I really like the
distinctive pattern of 'Barbarian' and
I had a feeling it would cross well
with correia-araujoi. I had just one
problem... I didn't have 'Barbarian' in
my collection!

One aspect of hybridising that I have
really appreciated is the willingness
of hybridists, and growers to share

plants.

It is one thing to come up with creative
ideas for new hybrids, quite another
to have all the suitable parent plants.
A couple of phone calls was all it
took to find a generous friend who
had a 'Barbarian' that I could use for
this project. It was a well patterned
plant and best of all, it was producing
bromeliad gold. Yes, the plant was in
flower.

Over the next few weeks I was able
to pollinate a number of flowers and
the cross took extremely well. Every
flower I pollinated with 'Barbarian'
produced seed, a 100% success rate!
The berries fattened up quickly and

then turned a deep chilli red colour,
indicating they were ripe. I set up
about 100 seed to germinate, enough to
give me a good number of seedlings to
select from. My goal with this cross was
to produce a plant with the distinctive
'Barbarian' pattern while adding wider
leaves and size from correia-araujoi.
The seedlings proved to be vigorous
and I was able to select the best half
dozen plants after two years of growth.

These six plants were grown together

outside for another year and one of
these proved to be a stand out plant.
This plant flowered for me in January
2010 and as the flower developed,
the plant really started to glow. The
central leaves lightened and opened up
as the outer leaves turned a rich brick
red. This gave the impression of the
plant holding onto the sun, therefore
it deserved to be named 'Maui' after
the legend of Maui capturing the sun.
When I went to register this plant in
2012 I discovered that the name 'Maui'
had already been taken, so I added the
prefix 'Pacific' giving the registered
name of 'Pacific Maui'. The plant
pupped well, so I was able to build up
numbers and had it ready for release at
'Cool Broms' in March 2013.

Cont'd from P15 – The Hybridising Journey

The 'Pacific Maui' hybridising journey
does not end here. In the last article I
mentioned that correia-araujoi hybrids
have a tendency to flower early in our
climate. This tendency can result in the
plant not reaching its full potential as
it doesn't have a chance to develop the
stacked rosette of leaves as it would in
a warmer climate.

As I am hybridising obsessed, my brain
is always thinking of ways to improve
on my hybrids. My thought process
with 'Pacific Maui' was to cross it with
a plant that would retain the colour,
size and toughness, while extending
the flowering cycle, allowing the plant
to produce a nice full rosette of leaves
for that lush tropical look. At this time
a number of hybrids from 'Skotak's
Tiger' were starting to show up
overseas and I liked the look of them,

so a cross to this carcharodon was an

obvious choice.

During 2006 when I did my original
correia-araujoi crosses, carcharodon
was not readily available. However,
when 'Pacific Maui' first flowered for
me during January 2010, 'Skotak's
Tiger' was available and it was
producing bromeliad gold. I pollinated
twelve flowers and fortunately 50%
proved successful. The rich chilli red
berries were ripe in about four months

and I grew on some 300 seed. The
seedlings turned out to be relatively
fast growers and I was able to have
them potted up and growing outside
during the summer of 2011. As the
plants developed they have shown a
wide range of interesting patterns. The
typical 'Barbarian' and marmorated
leaf patterns seem to be dominant in
the grex, as only a few seedlings show
any hint of 'Skotak's Tiger' zonation.

The grex is now just over four years

from seed with none showing any sign

of flowering. (Most of my primary
correia-araujoi hybrids had already
flowered by this stage).

I'm pleased the way this project is
turning out as extending the time

before flowering was one of my goals.

Many of the plants are showing
potential, but there is one that has

proved to be a real stand out...

It has developed the form of a
carcharodon with bold red leaf tips
setting off the unusual marmorated
leaf markings that make me think of
a snake skin pattern. If this plant can
continue growing for another season
or two before flowering, it will be
stunning plant, giving me that lush
tropical look I desire. If not... I do have
another couple of crosses in mind...

Learning about the genera : Aechmea
– Article by Peter Waters
The name aechmea comes from

the Greek 'aechme' meaning

speartip, taken from the sharp
point on the primary bracts and
sepals of most species. The genus
was originally named Aechmea by
the Spanish botanists, Ruiz and Pavon
in 1793 and the bromeliad so named
was Aechmea paniculata from Peru.
The very broad description of genus
Aechmea has allowed the entry of
some 259 species, many with widely
divergent characteristics. This genus
has become somewhat of a repository
for any species that doesn't quite fit
elsewhere. In the late 1800s the species
were divided into eight subgenera in an
attempt to restore some order. In 1990
Smith and Kress raised each of the
eight Aechmea subgenera to the level of
genus. However this was not accepted
by many of the leading botanists at the
time, and Luther returned them to the
status quo. There is no doubt though
that this will happen again when more
study has been done, particularly
in the DNA field. In 1992 the 21
species in the genus Streptocalyx were
transferred to Aechmea this time by
Smith and Spencer. This was accepted
as a logical move.

In an attempt to try and make some
sense of Aechmea, the following
descriptions of the eight subgenera and
the names of aechmeas that are in New
Zealand may help.

ORTGIESIA

This subgenus contains 22 species,
many of which are commonly found
in cultivation. Inflorescences may
be compound or simple, lax or
dense, usually elevated on a scape or
stem. Flowers are sessile (attached
directly to stem and not on a stalk or
pedicel), petals obtuse or rounded, and
sepals have a distinct spine (armed).
Unfortunately they are extremely
easy to hybridise and there are so
many hybrids, that it is becoming
difficult to find the true species. They
occur in Eastern and Southern Brazil
and one, recurvata extends into
Uruguay, Paraguay and Argentina.
Because of the similar climate in
their natural habitat, they are found to
be particularly easy to grow in New
Zealand. Species include recurvata,
pimenti-velosoi, caudata, winkleri,
coelestis, organensis, gracilis, comata,
blumenavii, calyculata, apocalyptica,
cylindrata and gamosepala.

CHEVALIERA

Unlike the other subgenera, Chevaliera
are lacking or have only rudimentary
petal-appendages. The plants are
very large and the inflorescence
generally resembles a ball with many
flowers. They are sparsely spread
through Central America, Venezuela,
Colombia, Peru and Eastern Brazil and

Cont'd from P17 – Learning about the genera

the majority have a terrestrial habit. Of
the 25 species, maybe only three have
found their way to NZ, magdalenae,
leucolepis and sphaerocephala.

Because of their size, up to 2 metres,

they are of academic interest only to

the average grower. This subgenus is
the most likely to become a genus in
its own right and in fact Manzanares
treats it as such in his book on the
bromeliads of Ecuador.

PODAECHMEA

Six species from Mexico to Peru,
with compound, lax (or loose)
inflorescences, scurfy with flowers
on pedicels. Three species may
be encountered, lueddemanniana,
mexicana and haltonii. The flowers
are rather small but quite attractive and
colourful, turning into blue berries.
Because they hail from warmer areas
these species can be quite touchy,
particularly through the winter.

LAMPROCOCCUS

Fifteen species mainly from Brazil's

Atlantic Forest with a couple from
the Amazonian area. The latter have
a simple inflorescence with pedicels,
while the ones from Brazil have mostly
compound (or branched) inflorescences
and sessile flowers, i.e. no pedicels.

Some of these are commonly grown

in NZ and are weilbachii, racinae,
miniata, warasii, and fulgens. Less
common are farinosa, victoriana,
carvalhoi and andersonii. The flowers
on these species are the berry type and

often pendent as commonly seen on

the hybrid 'Foster's Favorite'.

MACROCHORDION

Eight species with a dense conelike
inflorescence and unarmed sepals, i.e.
without a spine. Seen in our gardens
are lamarchei, triangularis, maculata
and bromeliifolia. Their natural
habitat is Brazil with the exception

of bromeliifolia which grows from

Guatemala to Argentina and is one
of the most widespread bromeliad
species. They are reasonably hardy and
grow well in full sun in New Zealand.

POTHUAVA

Somewhat similar to subgenus
Macrochordion but the difference
here is that the sepals are armed, or
have a spine at the tip. This is very
evident if you try to run your hand
down a pineliana inflorescence. The
inflorescences are dense, simple and
with sessile flowers. This group of 25
species comes mainly from southern
Brazil with some species from Central
America and northern South America.

One of the most widespread species
is nudicaulis, which explains the
great variation in its appearance.

The Brazilian species are hardy and

include pineliana, ornata, alopecurus,
vanhoutteana and pectinata.

PLATYAECHMEA

This subgenus consists of seventeen
species. These include chantinii,
zebrina, retusa, tessmannii,
manzanaresiana, and romeroi from the
Amazonia region, and from the West
Indies, dichlamydea, smithiorum and
serrata. Aechmea distichantha and

wittmackiana come from Southern
Brazil. The common floral feature of
these is the decurrent floral bracts,
which form a pouch around the
flowers. The Amazonian species
have very attractive and long-lasting
inflorescences, but are difficult to
cultivate in New Zealand without
some form of heating over winter.

AECHMEA

Subgenus Aechmea is a conglomeration
of the remaining 141 species. There
are many groupings included in this
division, for instance the familiar
orlandiana, fosteriana, milsteiniana,
correia-araujoi and disjuncta complex
and the fasciata, flavorosea, caesia and
dealbata group. Other species which
may be encountered in New Zealand
include gigantea, blanchetiana,
biflora, mulfordii, phanerophlebia,
araneosa, nallyi, spectabilis, fendleri
and azurea. Inflorescences may be
simple or compound, lax or dense,
flowers opposite each other or around
the stem, and always sessile, and sepals
may or may not have spines. This
means that there is a large variation in
this group. Hopefully DNA sampling
will be able to help get some order
into Aechmea, subgenus and genus.

The only thing we can be sure
about is that we will need many

label changes in the future.

A selection of aechmeas...

Aechmea caudata.
Photo: Andrew Devonshire
Aechmea mexicana.

Photo: Graeme Barclay

Aechmea lamarchei.

Photo: Peter Waters

More photos on P20 19

Aechmea alopecurus.
Photo: Graeme Barclay
Aechmea distichantha.
Photo: Graeme Barclay
Aechmea fosteriana.
Photo: Peter Waters
Aechmea fasciata.
Photo: Andrew Devonshire
Aechmea blanchetiana.
Photo: Graeme Barclay
Aechmea gigantea. Photo: John Mitchell
Aechmeas...
Aechmea milsteiniana.
Photo: Peter Waters

 November 2014
VOL 54 NO 11
Orthophytum burle-marxii. Photo: Peter Waters
Guzmania

By Graeme Barclay

Alcantarea 'Bobby Powell' and Alcantarea 'Bobby Gold'

These variegated alcantareas are alcantarea seed posted to her from
the result of a species seedling Adda Abendroth in Brazil. Apparently,
mutation and a vegetative sport. only two seedlings survived
Around 1980, Queensland bromeliad germination and were nurtured into
grower Olwen Ferris grew some large potted specimens of what she

Alcantarea 'Bobby Gold' – PHOTO GRAEME BARCLAY

Alcantarea 'Bobby Powell'
– PHOTO RICK CAIRNS
Alcantarea 'Bobby Gold' – PHOTO PETER TRISTRAM

believed to be a form of Alcantarea
imperialis. Eventually, when Olwen
had to move into a retirement home,
she gave the plants away – one went to
her friend, Bobby Powell, in the Gold
Coast to grow on. Bobby planted it in
the ground, where it supposedly took
around another 12 years to mature
and bloom. When it did so, no other

she was able to give self-set seed to
nurseryman Bruce Dunstan to grow.

In 2000, when Bruce's seed

single centrally variegated seedling in
the grex, which he naturally nurtured
with great care. When mature, it
revealed a green rosette with uneven
golden-yellow variegations and
striations down the centre of each

plant the seed came from, so was quite
obviously a true alcantarea species, but
certainly not
They appeared to be closely related
to Alcantarea extensa, but tended to
lack the white-grey scurfed banding
some clones of extensa have. As with
a lot of alcantarea seed sent ex Brazil
in the earlier days, exact provenance is
often unrecorded or unknown, so it is

they are – especially when botanical
descriptions such as Alcantarea
extensa are not that detailed. Around
2011, Bruce registered and named the
variegated plant Alcantarea 'Bobby
Powell', to honour the provider of the
seed. He also subsequently registered
the original non-variegated green plant
in 2011 as Alcantarea 'Gold Coast',
to honour its origin in Australia.

But the story does not end there. After
the variegated Alcantarea 'Bobby

normal vegetative pups in 2006. One
pup had a much broader, centrally
variegated, solid golden stripe than
its siblings. It proved to be very stable
and grew into a beautiful, striking
specimen. Pups also proved to be
stable (more so than grass pups that
often revert to green or striated) and

in 2012 as Alcantarea 'Bobby Gold'.

These variegated alcantareas are large
growers up to 1.5m diameter and make
fantastic garden or potted focal points,
with their contrasting green and
gold colours. Despite their delicate,
variegated looks, they are extremely
hardy and will take full sun conditions
with ease. Like all alcantareas, they
enjoy a good feed and plenty of water
in the warm seasons in order to attain a
large size and healthy growth, but must
be protected from frosty conditions.

As with most variegated bromeliads,
growing seed from these two striped
plants will unfortunately not mass
reproduce their variegated forms. It is
possible some variegates may result
from seed sown, but the hit-rate is
virtually a nil chance! This means
we have to wait for pups, hence they
currently remain rare and expensive,
with lengthy 'waiting lists'. However,
it hopefully won't be too many more
years before more pups from these
fantastic new broms are available so
they can be grown and admired in
Kiwi gardens.

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – November 2014 issue

CONTENTS

'Special Species Spotlight' – Graeme Barclay 2
President's Page – Graeme Barclay 5

Bromeliad Society October meeting news – Dave Anderson 7
More photos from World Conference – Peter Waters 10
German tricks for mounting tillandsias – Hawi Winter 12
Group News 14
Learning about the genera: Dave Anderson on Guzmania 17

do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 14 for details of group meeting

times and venues.

NOVEMBER
23rd Hawkes Bay Group meeting
25th Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden and
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The
Monthly Choice competition: Christmas
plant arrangements. Presentation of
monthly competition trophies and our
annual plant auction. Then we have more
fun at our Christmas supper. Please bring
a plate!
30th Northland Group Christmas Lunch

DECEMBER

7th South Auckland Group meeting
10th Bay of Plenty Group meeting and
garden visit
14th Far North Group meeting

JANUARY
27th Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden and
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The
Monthly Choice competition: Billbergia.
Peter Waters will talk about the 'Fiesta'/
Show competition rules and Nancy

display from a judge's perspective.

FRONT COVER: Photo by Peter Waters. This
spectacular species was discovered in 1965 in Bahia, Brazil, growing on limestone
plateaus. Its brilliant red colouration has it called 'Sunburst' by the locals. It requires

type of orthophytum found since burle-marxii and they will probably be moved to a
genus of their own. Roberto Burle-Marx (1909-1994) was a Brazilian whose designs
of parks and gardens made him world famous. He was also a painter, print maker,
ecologist, naturalist, artist and musician. Over 500 plants bear his name.

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Festive greetings everyone,

last Society meeting for the year is
nearing and the festive season is well
on the way. Apart from a few rogue
hail storms in a few areas, the weather
is warming up nicely and the broms
are 'on-the-go' again. I've had over
35 degree temperatures already in my
greenhouse in late October and it could
be a very warm Summer – so do get
that shade cloth sorted and be prepared!

A little reminder – if you're looking
for something to do this Summer –
visit Eden Garden on Mt. Eden to see
the refurbished 'Bromeliad Glade'.
This area is set on and over a rocky
cliff outcrop under native bush, with
a seating area and winding paths and
steps and it is now looking fantastic,
thanks to some much needed tidying up
and replanting, regularly undertaken
over the past year by a few dedicated
Society members. Special thanks to
working bee organiser, Isla McGowan
and her helpers. There is now a sign
detailing that the Bromeliad Glade is
maintained by the BSNZ. If you have
a chance... enjoy a beautiful walk and
a coffee at the café.

the year is Tuesday November 25th
and will again include our rare plant

auction. It's not too late to enter a
special plant in the auction, remember
you will get 80% of the price attained.
Give me a call on 09-817 4153 by
Monday night (November 24th), if
you have a plant to enter. All genera
accepted – and even bromeliad
books and artwork are welcome.

We will be presenting our monthly
competition and society service
trophies – congratulations in advance
to the trophy winners – followed
by our Christmas supper, so please
remember to bring a plate. There were
some fabulous plants tabled this year
and thanks to all those members who
put the effort into bringing plants along
each month. Without your support, we
would not really have a meeting to
enjoy.

I will also look forward once again
to the amazing Christmas bromeliad
arrangements in our monthly choice
competition – give it a go, you might
be surprised what you can create !

Finally, on behalf of all the BSNZ
committee, I wish you all a safe
and happy holiday season – and a
prosperous 2015. Take care in the
sun and enjoy the weather with your
families, friends, gardens and broms.

Cheers, Graeme Barclay

November 25th. Please ring Graeme Barclay to enter your plant.

.

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters

Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451
David Cowie 09-630 8220
Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Sandy Stonham 09-627 9658
Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or

policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.

BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first

Tuesday of publication month

Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

'Buy & Swap'

Listings in 'Buy & Swap' are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Bromeliad Society October

Meeting News – Notes and photos by Dave Anderson

President Graeme Barclay
welcomed everyone and then
discussed the current business,
starting with the Kiwi open day sale
held at Andrew and Rhonda Maloy's
on Sunday October 12. It was a great
success and he thanked everyone who
helped on the day. The 'Fiesta', with our
annual show competition, is booked for
February 20, 21 and 22 next year. It is
only four months away so please start
preparing to groom the plants that you
are planning to enter. We are always
looking for articles to publish in the
journal and appreciate those members
who have contributed. Next month,
November, we have our annual auction
of rare bromeliad plants – if you have
any for sale please contact Peter Waters
or Graeme Barclay. Also, November is
the last meeting of the year so would
you please return any books that you
have borrowed from the library.

Peter discussed the 'Show and Tell'
plants. First up for display were the
two closely related species Tillandsia
gardneri and chapeuensis that were

in flower. Next was a neoregelia that

was probably a hybrid of Neoregelia
concentrica with the owner wanting
to know if its name was Neoregelia
'Thunderclouds' – "cv. of concentrica
'Plutonis' x sarmentosa 'DeLeon's
Species #8' – (Other cv. = 'Stormy
Weather') – Medium small short stoloned
plant of 15-16 leaves irregularly spaced

– stiff and leathery". No it wasn't as
Neoregelia 'Thunderclouds' is a much
smaller plant than the one displayed.
Two different sized plants of the species
Quesnelia leiboldiana, in flower, were
displayed with Peter suggesting that

the inflorescence of deep blue flowers

and red bracts could be dwarfed. Also
for display was the comparatively very
small species Alcantarea farneyi in

full flower. Peter mentioned that Elton

Leme has just described another small
species as Alcantarea nana. Most
alcantareas are usually bigger than 1
metre in diameter. Two plants of the
species Tillandsia recurvifolia in flower
were displayed with owner wanting to
know how one could tell which variety
they were. Peter explained that many
of these plants were and are wrongly
named in NZ as Tillandsia meridionalis
so please change this name if you are
using it. The way to tell the difference
in these plants is as follows:

Tillandsia recurvifolia var.
subsecundifolia has orange bracts and

white flowers;

Tillandsia recurvifolia var. recurvifolia

has pink/red bracts and white flowers

and the often wrongly named similar
plant Tillandsia leonamiana has pink

bracts and lavender blue flowers. Lastly

Peter displayed the beautiful species

Quesnelia edmundoi var rubrobracteata

that grows endemically in Bahia. One
of the plants he was growing outside, in
Auckland, had suffered badly from the
colder temperatures we have compared
to those in NE Brazil. The second plant
he was growing in a heated house and
looked quite stunning with its dark red/
black foliage.

We then had a PowerPoint presentation
showing some marvellous photos from

Cont'd P8

Cont'd from P7 – Bromeliad Society Meeting News

the recently held BSI world conference
in Hawaii with commentary by Andrew
Maloy, Peter Waters and Diana Holt.

Our supper break was something very
special with Larry Murphy and his
helpers cooking up a superb array of
whitebait fritters. A special thank you
to Larry.

Anderson.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First equal were three
plants – Peter Waters with Orthophytum
burle-marxii -a quite stunning plant

David Goss with Vriesea
hybrid' and Peter Coyle with Billbergia
'Arribella'.

Also in the competition were Aechmea
gracilisGuzmania xNeomea
Neoregelia 'Avalon' x

Vriesea 'Christiane' and 'Snowman'.
Open Foliage: First was Peter Coyle
with L x
'Tiger Tim' – a striking plant with the
red banding and colour intonation in
the leaves. Second was Peter Waters
with xQuesmea (Aechmea orlandiana
x Quesnelia edmundoi rubrobracteata).
In the competition were Aechmea
nudicaulis (a clump of a very red form
of this species), 'Ensign', 'Fosters
Billbergia 'Domingos
Neoregelia
correia-araujoi, 'Lynx' x 'Aussie
Dream', 'Carnival', 'Downs Point'
and Vriesea 'Tiger Tim' x

gruberi – a reverse of the cross that won
1st in this section.
Tillandsia: Lynette Nash's Tillandsia
fuchsii forma gracilis

most attractive number of plants in

second also going to Bev Ching's
Tillandsia cacticola. There were on
the table Tillandsia straminea, stricta
x aeranthos, 'Phoenix', roseoscapa,
caulescens, stricta and .

Neoregelia:
with Neoregelia
very attractive hybrid. There a total of
four entries of this Margaret Paterson

Graham was second with a Neoregelia
'Chiquita Linda'. In the competition
were Neoregelia 'Totara Fireworks',
eltoniana, carolinae 'Hot Flash', 'Big
Star' x 'Big Boy', 'Milagro', 'Gympie
Bingo', 'Grace Avalanche' x 'Punctate
Red', 'Spotted Devil' x carcharodon
'Skotaks Tiger', 'Exotica', 'Unravelled'
and 'Tiger Candy' x 'Midnight'.

Named Monthly Plant (Vriesea with
spotted leaves): First was Peter Coyle
with a Vriesea '2007 Snow Candy'.
Second equal were Graeme Barclay
with a Vriesea botafogensis
Mitchell with
gruberi x 'Angela'. In the competition
were Vriesea splendens F2, lubbersii,
gigantea x guttata, aff. lubbersii,
fenestralis and 'Hoelscheriana '.

The Plant of the Month Trophy went
to Peter Coyle with Neoregelia 'Totara
Fireworks'.

Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING: Tues 25th Nov.

Photos from October monthly meeting...

BY DAVE ANDERSON

Neoregelia 'Totara Fireworks'
(Peter Coyle). 'Plant of the Month'.

Billbergia 'Aribella' (Peter Coyle). First

Tillandsia fuchsia forma gracilis

(Lynette Nash). First in tillandsia section.

Neoregelia 'Jewellery Shop' (ChrisPaterson). First in neoregelia section.
Vriesea ospinae var gruberi x 'Tiger Tim'
(Peter Coyle). First in open foliage section.

10More beautiful plants from the WorBromeliad Conference 2014...
PHOTOS BY PETER WATERS
Neoregelia 'Cats Pyjamas'
Vriesea 'Tulip'
Neoregelia 'Purple Majesty'
Neoregelia 'Hawaiian Beauty'

11xNeophytumEcstasy'
WerauhiaEdna Shiigi'
VrieseaAbigail Jean'
Neoregelia 'Talk of the Town'

Mounting tillandsias ... German tricks

Mounting substrates for tillandsias

Tillandsia carriers A big stick in the middle, drilled and
waiting for their plants. wired, smaller twigs on the outside. Tillandsia tied on to the
carrier and hung up.

Tying tillandsias

The rings – 'made from nylon Starting with two of the rings,
stockings or panty hoses. they get over-lapped...

...then pulled throughto link them.
Through a loop the
nylon gets attached tothe twig.
Now the nylon gets wound aroundthe stick (Tillandsia is missing in
this demo).
Once the nylon strand getstoo short, it gets extended byattaching another nylon ring.

Mounting tillandsias ... German tricks

U

When visiting Germany I was
privileged to get a guided
tour through the bromeliad
and plant collections of the late Prof.
Dr. Werner Rauh at the botanic gardens
of the University of Heidelberg. The
man in charge is a well-known person
in the bromeliad community: Timm
Stolten. Timm is best described as
friendly, competent, knowledgeable
and enthusiastic and a very worthy
guardian of the Rauh legacy. Timm
showed me around the glasshouses, the
outside areas and the workshop. I will
share with you a few of the things I
learned from him and his experiments.

V

When you collect tillandsias it is
necessary to attach the plants to
a carrier. Normally one goes for
substrates that are readily available,
cheap and aesthetically pleasing. In
Heidelberg, surrounded by vineyards,
traditionally grapevine wood was
used for the mounting of tillandsias.
Due to the mediocre durability of this
carrier several other types of wood
were trialled. The German oak, the
national tree of Germany, proved to be

other types of European wood. In
the end Taxus baccata, the European
yew tree, proved to be the best in the
search for a durable and workable
substrate. Also the pruning debris of
rhododendron shrubs (Rhododendron
ponticum) proved to be suitable. The
methodology of making bigger carriers
out of thinner twigs is intriguing:
around a thicker twig (drilled and

wired) several thinner twigs are
arranged and the whole bunch is
held together with the aide of some
galvanized wire (see picture).

The toxicity of yew and rhododendron
wood proved to be preventing both
borer and fungal attack. Tillandsias
like to send their little roots into the
gaps and cavities in between the twig
bunches.

Timm lamented the fact that he has
only two hands where he would have
liked to have three in the process of
mounting tillandsias to the carriers.
Again, through trial and error, he has
devised a practical solution that is both
advantageous for the plants as well
as aesthetically pleasing. His ties are,
as it is generally an accepted material
amongst bromeliad collectors, nylon
stockings and panty-hoses. But Timm
cuts them differently. He cuts the legs
of panty-hoses into 20 to 30 mm rings
(several panty-hoses at the same time
using sharp scissors). The rings are
hitched together as one goes, which
has the advantage of being able to work
with a short piece of string that can get
easily extended (without having three
hands).

Tillandsia adhesive

Alternatively one can use neutrally
curing type silicone sealant or adhesive
to attach tillandsias to carriers. The
acidic type silicone (smells of vinegar)
is not suitable and kills the plants.

Group News

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Jo Elder
Roger Allan presided over the October
meeting and welcomed 49 members and
8 visitors. He spoke about the bus trip to
Andrew and Rhonda Maloy's nursery on
12th October, the Sales day at the Matua
Hall to be held Saturday 29th November.
Members wishing to sell plants that
day need to book a table with Maxine
August.

Our guest speaker Hawi Winter had
travelled down from South Auckland
to speak to us. He gave the presentation
that he had given at the 'Cool Broms'
conference in Auckland last year. Our
members found the talk and the diagrams
extremely interesting and informative.
He told us about the Facebook Group,
which now has 850 members. To join,
go to Facebook and search for Kiwi
Bromeliad Group.

The Plant of the Month – Neoregelia:

1st Natalie and Brian Simmonds with
Neoregelia 'Scarlet Charlotte', 2nd Dean
Morman with Neoregelia 'Governors
Plea', 3rd equal Dean Morman with
Neoregelia 'Bobby Dazzler 'and Kevin
Pritchard with Neoregelia 'Meyendorfii'
(variegated).
Novice section: 1st Tom Slee with
Neoregelia 'Perfection', 2nd Gayle
LeRoy with Vriesea 'Crimson Vista',
3rd Diana Fiford with Neoregelia 'Alley
Cat'
Open Competition: 1st Gill Keesing
with Aechmea recurvata 'Tokuri', 2nd
Anne Stacey with Neoregelia 'Orange
Crush' and 3rd Dean Morman with
Neoregelia 'Sweet Noble'.
Tillandsia: 1st Audrey Hewson with

Tillandsia ionantha, 2nd Audrey
Hewson with Tillandsia tectorum,
3rd Marlene Thomson with Tillandsia
guatemalensis.

Next Meeting: December 10th.
Christmas Pot Luck lunch at Diana

and Cam Durrant's, 47 Junction Road,
Minden. Please bring finger food to share

and a plant or gift for the continuous

raffle. There is disabled parking up at the

house – everyone else please park in the
paddock at the side.
Garden visit, 10.30 am prior to lunch –
Rosemary Pettit's garden which is up the
driveway from Diana's.

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Sandra Wheeler
Twenty members made it to the meeting
in Sandra and Alan's garden at Labour
Weekend. It was a superb day and a very
lively meeting, followed by afternoon
tea out on the lawn under a tree.

Those who visited the Kiwi Bromeliads
Open Day in Auckland had a great trip
with many interesting purchases. Not
surprisingly we all came home with
much lighter wallets!

The meeting was told of the passing

of John Frew. John was a foundation

member of the Group, who, along
with his late wife Colleen, will be
remembered for all the good work they
did as members of our Group.

Vrieseas and their flowering habits

were discussed, with some members

concerned at the lack of flowers or pups.

It was suggested members just enjoy the

plants growing to a large size and not be

in a hurry for flowers and pups which

will see the demise of the plant.

'Show & Tell' Competition:

1st Laura Maton – Aechmea 'Purple
Heart', 2nd equal Pat Vendt – Neoregelia
'Totara Gold Spot' and Lyn White –
xNeomea 'Strawberry'.

Not a large number of plants in the
competition but all of very good quality.

After the raffles, Sandra headed out

into the garden with secateurs in hand
and where the tillandsias and Aechmea

recurvata in flower caught the eye and

many members went home with some
new little treasures.

Christmas Lunch: Please remember
Christmas Lunch on November 30th
replaces our November meeting.

Far North Bromeliad Group

– Erin Titmus
We did not meet in October but we
held another very successful show in
conjunction with the local orchid society.

Our November meeting was held in

the magnificent gardens of Mal and

Susi Liddington in Waipapa West. We
were spoiled to be able to enjoy the
surroundings set up for a wedding the
previous day: marquee, lounging chairs,
seating and cool drinks bar all sited
beside the pond and decked platform.
The previous week the property had
been part of the Rotary Garden Safari
held annually in the Kerikeri district.
To see some great pictures go to www.
susiliddington.com

We had a large auction of some of the

bromeliad collection of our late founder

members John and Colleen Frew (there

will be an obituary published in this

Journal in January). Bidding was lively

for some rare plants with proceeds

going toward a memorial seat to John

and Colleen at the new Opua Railway
Station.

Next Meeting: Christmas meeting on
December 14th. If you are visiting and
would like to join us please contact Dot
phone 09-405 7607.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
We had a good turnout for our November
meeting. Marie Healey reminded
members of our trip to Hamilton Gardens
on 1st March 2015. (Margaret Kitcher is
now taking names for the trip). Margaret
Flanagan advised that we have been
invited to visit Russell Hudson's Orchid
nursery in late March.
Because of Fathers Day parking
problems, in future we will hold our
September meeting on the second, rather

than the first, Sunday in September.

Our guest speaker was Martin Walker
from Coromandel Cacti and he gave an
excellent presentation. Members avidly
purchased the plants that he brought
along for sale.

For our skite segment Dawn Ashton
brought along an Aechmea recurvata,
Jenny Gallagher an Aechmea 'Bert',
and an Aechmea 'Bert' (variegated);
Margaret Flanagan a Tillandsia
leonaniana which has a pale blue tinge

to the flowers; John Muddiman an

xNeomea 'Strawberry', Don Brown a
Vriesea platynema variegata. and Basil
Lawrence an Arisaema candidissimum,

Cont'd P16 15

16 Cont'd from P15 – Group News
Next Meeting: Christmas meeting and
BBQ, Sunday, December 7th, at Margaret
and Robert Flanagan's, 120 Flanagan
Road, Drury. Members are reminded to
bring along a plate of finger food, a chair
and a mug. We will have our usual fun
auction and a prize will be awarded to
the person who wears the Christmas hat
that makes the judges smile the most.
Our first meeting of 2015 will be on
February 1st at the home of Ann and
Graham Thomson, 265 Ponsford Road,
Te Toro at 1:30pm.
Hawke's Bay Bromeliad Group
– Pieter Franklin and Julie Greenhill
Our bi-monthly meeting was attended by
19 members, including a new recruit who
has moved to the Bay from the Thames /
Coromandel Group. We enjoyed a talk on
the splitting, planting and general care of
Cryptanthus, given by Bill Young. This
was very well received as we don't see
a lot of these plants and some members
had not had any previous experience
with them.
We then had a workshop where we rolled
up chicken netting into a tight cylinder
and threaded a wire down the centre to
form a hook for hanging the creation.
Next the cylinders were twisted and
formed into a spiral shape (although any
shape could be made) and were wrapped
in Tillandsia usneoides. The finished
specimens would be great hanging in
trees where there was a bit of a breeze
to move them. Thanks to Bill Young and
Dave Lowe for the talk and supply of
Tillandsia usneoides for the workshop.
Competition:
Flowering: 1st Vriesea 'Highway Beauty'
– Yvonne Richardson, 2nd Neoregelia
'Flama' – Julie Greenhill, 3rd Vriesea
'Highway Beauty' – Julie Greenhill.
Non Flowering : 1st Neoregelia 'Aztec
Gold' – Margaret Bluck, 2nd Neoregelia
'Champagne Delight' –Julie Greenhill,
3rd Neoregelia 'Manoa Beauty' –Yvonne
Richardson.
Miniature: 1st Neoregelia 'Rosie
Fireball' – Julie Greenhill, 2nd
Neoregelia 'Lilacena' – Pieter Franklin,
3rd Neoregelia 'Alley Cat' – Yvonne
Richardson.
Tillandsia: 1st Tillandsia aeranthos (on
rope) – Pieter Franklin, 2nd Tillandsia
aeranthos (on mount) – Pieter Franklin,
3rd Tillandsia stricta – Pieter Franklin.
Next Meeting: Sunday, November 23rd
will be our last for the year and we are
looking forward to welcoming guest
speaker, Andrew Flower from Anwyl
Bromeliads.
Tillandsia Group – Lester Ching
We met at Margaret and Robert
Flanagan's in Drury. Thanks for hosting
the meeting. Some nice plants of
straminea, cacticola, purpurea, which
come from Peru and Equador at an
elevation of 300 to 2300 metres. Tom
Good had a nice clump of ionantha
which we could not name, Lynette Nash
had 'iggy', and 'mess it up red' (Andrew
Flower hybrids) and an ionantha from
Mexico. These all had brilliant red colour
due to high light, also present were
fuchsia var gracilis and brachycaulos in
flower with brilliant colour. Most plants
will grow on wood, bark even small
stones in a pot. They are easy to grow.
If unsure please ring Lester Ching for
advice. Our next meeting date and venue
will be advised in the New Year.

Cont'd P18 17
The genus Guzmania was
established by Ruiz and Pavon
in 1802. They named it in honour
of the Spanish pharmacist Anastasio
Guzman. However it was not until
another 73 years had passed; when the
French plant collector Edouard Andre
came back from his expedition of 1875
to South America with 25 species of
these very colourful attractive plants
that interest was aroused in this genus.
They are endemic through Central
America and the West Indies to as far
south as western Brazil. Generally they
grow as epiphytes on trees and bushes
in the shady, humid and warm areas
of the tropical rainforests but some do
grow as terrestrials at high altitude in
the Andes and these are often 1.5-2m in
diameter. Like tillandsias and vrieseas
to which they are closely related too,
guzmanias grow between sea-level and
3,000m. They distinguish themselves
from vrieseas in that they have fine
deep reddish/brown lines at the bases
of the leaves and in some instances the
leaves are striped or barred.
Even though there are far fewer species
of guzmania, (about 215), compared
to either vrieseas or tillandsias they
are grown in much larger numbers in
nurseries than the latter two genera
because of their beautifully coloured
bracts and flowers. In particular the
nurseries in the USA, Holland and
Belgium have produced many beautiful
hybrids that are ideal for inside window
Learning about the genera : Guzmania
– Dave Anderson
boxes and small greenhouses as long
as they have warmth and humidity.
Because most guzmanias brought into
cultivation are native to tropical areas,
they prefer warmer temperatures and
humidity. Guzmania should not be
allowed to stand in temperatures lower
than 120C and prefer temperatures
between 200C and 250C. They will also
fail to thrive if the temperatures remain
above 300C for an extended period of
time. Be especially careful during
the winter not to let your guzmanias
become too cold and dry. The funnels
should always be kept full of water.
In Auckland the culture of guzmanias
is relatively simple in that the plants
can be grown like vrieseas albeit that
they need to be given some extra
warmth through the winter months.
The following are some of the species
that have been brought to N.Z. and can
be grown in pots.
The first six species below can be
grown outside in Auckland year round
but need protection through the winter
months:
• Guzmania sanguinea – A handsome
species that was first collected from
the Andes of Colombia and brought
to Europe in 1876 by Andre. It has a
widespread habitat being found in
Costa Rica, Venezuela the West Indies
and other Central American countries.
The name sanguinea means blood red
and is given because of the colour of

Cont'd from P17– Learning about the genera

the inner rosette leaves when in bloom
especially the variety brevipediculata.
There are two forms of this species var.
sanguinea with 40cm long leaves and
the smaller form var.
with 20cm long leaves. The vibrantly
colourful leaves when in bloom make
it one of the most beautiful guzmanias.

D – This

in Peru and Ecuador growing
epiphytically and terrestrially at
altitudes of 1,300 – 1,700m. The name

with the scape rising some 50cm above
the leaves that are 60-80cm long. The

D – A large
species with colourful red/yellow
primary bracts that looks most

growing epiphytically and terrestrially
from 1100-2,800m in Venezuela to
Peru.

L – A largish
species with a 1m high long lasting

primary bracts depends on the variety
and varies from red through lilac to
yellow making it a most attractive
plant. It comes from Colombia and
Ecuador at an altitude of 250-1,500m.

H – A medium
sized plant with leaves 60cm long
and 3.5cm wide. The cone shaped

being white compared to the yellow

at an altitude of 2,100-2,600m and
consequently does well outside in
Auckland all year.

D – A

high when in bloom. The primary
bracts are bright red contrasting with
the white petals with the species

period. A plant that grows in the cloud
forests and is well suited to our climate.

The following species need to be grown
in a humid warm house particularly
through the winter months:

L – The leaves
on this beautiful plant are dark green
with white patterned wave bands.
The leaf blades are up to 70cm long
and 5-7cm wide so the plant can look
quite stunning in its non-blooming
state. Its habitat is North and Central
Peru where it grows epiphytically in
mountain forests at 1,200-2,500m.
L – Another
species with highly patterned wide
leaves that can grow up to 2.5m high
with a rosette some 1.5m diameter. It
needs to be grown in warm conditions
as it originates from the tropical
rainforest of NE Peru at 800m.
L – The leaves of this
small species are green on top and red/
brown on the underside. The bright red

petals making it a colourful plant.

D – A plant
with glossy green leaves 30-40cm

starts off green, then develops dark red
lines with vivid red bracts at the top

D – The name
refers to the tongue shaped bracts. This
species is found growing extensively
throughout Central America. It is very
popular in cultivation as it produces

and always has many offsets.

D – A moderately
large species with the name referring
to the patterned leaf markings. It is a
very decorative plant even when not
in bloom. It inhabits the rain forests
and swamps of Panama and Colombia
from sea level to 500m where it grows
as an epiphyte.
L – A species of
moderate size whose red rosette
and bracts contrast with the yellow
Guzmania wittmackii Red Form
PHOTO RICK MAJEWSKI
Guzmania wittmackii
PHOTO MCGREGOR SMITH

common in NZ collections some years
ago but not often seen now, especially
the variegated form.

Although the plants most readily
available from commercial nurseries
of this genus are hybrids the species
themselves are extremely colourful
and well worth the effort of obtaining
them.

Guzmania variegata

PHOTO DAVE ANDERSON
PHOTO PETER TRISTRAM
More photos on P20 19

More Guzmania
photos...

Guzmania squarrosa Yellow Bract Form
PHOTO PETER TRISTRAM
Guzmania squarrosa
PHOTO JO ELDER
Guz. sanguinea
PHOTO RICK MAJEWSKI
Photo: Peter Waters

2015 Bromeliad

AND SHOW 2015
Guzmania zahnii
PHOTO JOHN MITCHELL

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