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2013

2013 Journals

January 2013 February 2013 March 2013 April 2013 May 2013 June 2013 July 2013 August 2013 September 2013 October 2013 November 2013

 1JANUARY 2013 VOL 53 NO 1 Racinaea crispa. Photo by Peter Waters. Only two months until the conference! JANUARY 2013 VOL 53 NO 1 Racinaea crispa. Photo by Peter Waters. Only two months until the conference! Only two months until the 'Cool Broms' conference opens.

We have 210 registrations and there is real pressure on accommodation at the venue. There are not many rooms left. So, the message is, DON'T DELAY... BOOK TODAY! There is also a need for registrants who wish to attend the dinner on Friday night and the Sky Tower tour and dinner on Saturday night, both of which are optional extras, to reserve now as numbers, particularly for Saturday night are limited. You can pay on the website or for New Zealanders, a cheque or on the internet to account 03-0227-0071516-02 Bromeliad Society of NZ Conference account.

Partners who are not registered may also want to attend these events and also the Conference breakfast, banquet or two garden tours. Numbers for these, particularly the garden tours will also be limited.

The relevant prices are Friday night dinner $60, Saturday night Sky Tower dinner $75, Breakfast $30, Banquet $70 and the Garden Tours $25 each.

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME... MARCH 2013 THURSDAY 14th 2pm Displays set-up Foyers

5 – 8pm Registration Hospitality Desk

FRIDAY 15th 8 – 5pm Registration Hospitality Desk 8 – 10am Show set-up Promenade Room 10 – 1pm Show staging Promenade Room 1 – 5pm Sales plants set-up Banquet Room 2 1 – 5pm Show judging Promenade Room 1 – 5pm Plant sales raffle Hospitality Desk 5pm Raffle Draw Hospitality Desk 5-– 6pm Welcome party Horizon Lounge 5.30 – 7.30pm Sales plants open Banquet Room 2 6 – 9pm Show open Promenade Room 8pm Alfresco Dinner (optional) Exhibition Hall

7–8.30am SATURDAY 16th Breakfast Banquet Room 1

8 – 5pm Hospitality desk Foyer

8 – 8.45am Future Conferences meeting Cole Theatre

8.45am Conference opening Cole Theatre

8 – 1pm Show open Promenade Room

9 – 9.45am Seminar 1 – Elton Leme Cole Theatre Novelties in Brazilian Bromeliaceae

9.50 – 10.35am Seminar 2 – Michael Kiehl Cole Theatre A bromeliad journey 10.35 – 11am Coffee Break Horizon Lounge
SATURDAY 16th 11–11.45am SATURDAY 16th 11 – 11.45am Seminar 3 – Jose Manzanares Cole Theatre New classification of Tillandsioideae based on DNA studies 11.50 – 12.35pm Seminar 4 – Nigel Thomson Cole Theatre Bromeliads light up your life 12.35pm Lunch Horizon Lounge 1.30pm Garden tour West 5pm Raffle Draw Hospitality Desk 5 – 7pm Sales plants open Banquet Room 2 5 – 7pm Show open Promenade Room 7pm Sky Tower Dinner (optional) Sky Tower

SUNDAY 17th 8 – 5pm Hospitality Desk Foyer 8 – 1pm Show open Promenade Room 9 – 9.45am Seminar 5 – Elton Leme Cole Theatre A new approach to the taxonomy of Cryptanthus 9.50 – 10.35am Seminar 6 – Dennis Cathcart Cole Theatre Singapore's Gardens by the Bay 10.35 – 11am Coffee Break Horizon Lounge 11 – 11.45am Seminar 7 – José Manzanares Cole Theatre Ecuador, land of bromeliads (Condor Mountains) 11.50 – 12.35pm Seminar 8 – Andrew Maloy Cole Theatre Breeding vrieseas for colourful foliage 12.35pm Lunch Horizon Lounge 1.30pm Garden tour South 5pm Raffle Draw Hospitality Desk 5 – 7pm Show open Promenade Room 6 – 7pm Cocktail hour Horizon Lounge 6 – 9pm Auction viewing Horizon Lounge 7pm Banquet Banquet Room 1 9pm Auction Banquet Room 1

MONDAY 18th 8–12pm Show open Promenade Room 9 – 9.45am Seminar 9 – Hawi Winter Cole Theatre The simple science behind beautiful bromeliads 9.50 – 10.35am Seminar 10 – Michael Kiehl Cole Theatre fcbs.org and the Beadle legacy 10.35 – 11am Coffee Break Horizon Lounge 11 – 11.45am Seminar 11 – Dennis Cathcart Cole Theatre Tillandsias, from tiny to titans 11.50 – 12.35pm Internet bromeliads AD/GB Cole Theatre 12.35pm Lunch Horizon Lounge 1.30 – 2.15pm Seminar 12 – Elton Leme Cole Theatre The genus Alcantarea 2.15 – 2.45pm Conference closing Cole Theatre 3pm Break down

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc Bromeliad Journal – January 2013 issue CONTENTS 'Cool Broms' update and programme 2 President's Page – Jocelyn Coyle 5 Monthly Choice competition plants schedule 5 Bromeliad Society November meeting news – Dave Anderson 6 Racinaea crispa. Our cover photo – Peter Waters 7 New hybrids in New Zealand – Andrew Devonshire 8 'Buy & Swap' 9 2012 monthly competition and trophy winners 10 Ursulaea and a three year mystery - Andy Siekkinen 11 Queensland Spring Show photos – Jocelyn and Peter Coyle 14 Preparing bromeliads for shows – Brenda Wegner 15 Group News 16 Society officers, subs and Journal directory 19 Classic Brom Corner – Graeme Barclay 20
The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand
COMING EVENTS
Please see the Group News section starting on page 16 for details of group meeting times and venues.
JANUARY FEBRUARY 22nd Society monthly meeting at 3rd South Auckland Group meeting Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden 13th Bay of Plenty Group meeting and Windmill roads starting at 7.30pm. 20th Bay of Plenty Group garden visits Monthly choice competition: Aechmea 26th Society monthly meeting at nudicaulis and hybrids. Dave Anderson Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden will talk on 'Travels in Mexico'. and Windmill roads starting at 27th Northland Group meeting 7.30pm. Monthly choice competition:
Billbergias. There will be a preview of the 'Cool Broms' conference.
FRONT COVER: This very rare Racinaea crispa has just come into flower. Photo from Peter Waters and you can read Peter's notes about the plant on page 7.

PRESIDENT'S PAGE
W
W
elcome to 2013. I hope you have all had a Merry Christmas and you're ready for a great new year. My mother use to say, 'the years just fly by when you get older' and I find that now I have to agree with her!
I am sure we have an interesting year ahead of us with the 'Cool Broms' conference fast approaching in mid March. We currently have 210 people registered. It's going to be a great time to welcome friends and bromeliad enthusiasts to our country and share with them some of the wonderful hybridising and growing of bromeliads that we do in New Zealand.
Don't forget our annual show is also held in conjunction with the conference so please start sorting out those special plants now – i.e. don't be like us and leave it until the last week to rush around and find plants!
Please remember that you don't have to be attending conference to enter your plants in the show.
I would like to express a very big 'thank you' to everyone who phoned or emailed to ask how we got on when the tornado hit Whenuapai recently. Our phone lines were down for a week so we couldn't retrieve messages.
We can't believe how lucky we were when we look around at the devastation in the village... trees uprooted or just torn apart, roofs, windows, fences, sheds blown to pieces, power lines
down, trampolines flying through the air, glass panels out of glasshouses, recycle bins flying around with all the contents coming out and, sadly, three horses had to be put down. We were five minutes away when it happened and arrived home to a lot of debris over the lawn and one tree down on the boundary. Someone was certainly looking after us that day.
Last but not least, November was such a good meeting and congratulations to all those winners. Don't forget to spend your vouchers. The auction was very lively with some great bidding and really good plants. Thanks to everyone who contributed to make this a great meeting to finish the year.
I hope to see you all at our first meeting for the year on 22nd January.
Heads up on our monthly choice competitions
To help members plan their plant selection and grooming over the next busy months we thought we'd give everyone a preview of what's scheduled for the next few monthly society meetings.
January: Aechmea nudicaulis and hybrids February: Billbergias March: Aechmea fasciata and hybrids April: Best white plants May: Best red plants

Bromeliad Society November Meeting News – Dave Anderson
A
A
t our last meeting of 2012 Jocelyn Coyle welcomed over 60 members, including Kay Steen from Thames. She thanked all those who had helped at 'Broms in the Park' – a most enjoyable day with $200 being collected for the 'Cool Broms' conference. The visit to Judy Graham's, David Blundell's and Ann and Graham Thompson's gardens on Sunday the 18th was a great success, enjoyed by the large number of people who travelled out to Waiuku and its environs. Jocelyn asked us to start preparing our plants for the annual show that will be held at the 'Cool Broms' conference next March.
The annual competition and trophy winners were then presented with their prizes.
The 'Show and Tell' followed and first up for display was a most attractive billbergia cross, in flower, hybridised from two different Billbergia vittata cultivars, grown by Robbie Burns from a seedling that was given to him by Peter Coyle. Next and also for display was a miniature neoregelia hybrid made by Diana Holt that had beautiful banding on the leaves. Diana also brought in a neoregelia that she had purchased at the BSI conference in 2006 namely a Neoregelia 'Hannibal Lector' F2 that had lovely red coloured banding on green leaves. A hybrid made by Peter Coyle of Neoregelia lilliputiana x 'Skotak's Tiger' had yellowish coloured leaves with red bands. A member wanted to know the name of the dark red leaved plant that he had brought in. It was a Neoregelia 'Perfection' that had lost its variegations that quite often happens
with this hybrid. For display was the especially beautiful species Vriesea elata with its long stunning red inflorescence and white flowers. Finally there was the wrongly named plant Nidularium antoineanum with a flower spike that initially has red bracts that turn blue with time. This plant has been in NZ over 30 years and is a hybrid, definitely not the species antoineanum, and was given the name Nidularium 'Litmus' some years ago. If you have this plant please change the label on it.
The annual auction of rare and special plants followed with Peter Coyle our auctioneer doing another wonderful job.
Peter Waters won this month's raffle prize.
The door prizes went to Lynette Nash, Kelly Greenhalgh and Jeanene Barclay.
COMPETITIONS
Open Flowering: First was Peter Coyle with Billbergia 'Theodore L. Mead' and second equal were Jocelyn and Peter Coyle with Aechmea 'Flama' and Neoregelia 'Apricot Nectar'x 'Jewellery Shop' respectively – the latter a hybrid made by Peter some years ago. Also in the competition were Aechmea 'Foster's Favorite Favorite', 'Ensign', 'Mirlo'; Billbergia 'Hazy Purple'; Canistrum triangulare; Guzmania 'Soledo'; Neoregelia pineliana, 'Morris Henry Hobbs' and Vriesea guttata. Open Foliage: First was Peter Coyle with Aechmea blanchetiana – always looks great if protected during the colder months. Alan Cliffe was second with

Guzmania sanguinea 'Tricolor' – a cv. of the species that is most attractive when in flower. In the competition were Aechmea fosteriana; Neoregelia pabstiana, 'Octi', 'Carnival'; xHohenelia 'Nifty Nev'; Vriesea 'Peppermint Slice', 'Jewel hybrid', 'Summer Ice' and 'Angela' x 'Snowman'. Tillandsia: Dave Dawson was first with Tillandsia albertiana a clump of several plants all out with their stunning red flowers and second was Lester Ching with Tillandsia yunckeri – a plant that was originally imported into NZ some 20 years ago as Tillandsia imperialis 'Giant'. In the competition were Tillandsia biflora, lucida, circinnatoides, straminea, deppeana, beutelspacheri x flabellata and tectorum. Neoregelia: Peter Waters was first with Neoregelia 'Shamrock' and second was Don Brown with a Neoregelia 'Totara Twist'. In the competition were Neoregelia smithii x 'Small World', 'Tara Beauty', 'Barbarian' x 'Enchantment', 'Gympie Spirit', 'Little Faith', 'Ryan' (variegated), 'Hannibal Lector' x 'Chubby' F2, 'Yang', 'Green Beauty', 'Starry Eyed', 'Knight Desire' and ('Lineata' x concentrica) x 'Royal Hawaiian'. Christmas Decoration: First was Judy Graham with a lovely arrangement – with red and silver colours and second was Nancy Murphy with an attractive arrangement in a glass bowl. All of the arrangements in this year's competition were as usual of a very high standard. As has been the custom in recent years the winner received a special present from our Patron - Patricia Sweeney. The Plant of the month went to Dave Dawson with Tillandsia albertiana. Congratulations to all the winners. Before Christmas supper Jocelyn distributed lucky dip presents that she and Peter had wrapped for all those in attendance that everyone appreciated. The closure of the meeting followed to complete a most convivial evening. NEXT MEETING: Tuesday 22nd January. Our front cover photo... by standing the pot in a saucer of water. Amazingly enough this does the trick and it grows quite happily producing pups and a very attractive yellow inflorescence somewhat reminiscent of that of Tillandsia dyeriana. Several members now have this growing and it should be well established here in a few years. Our front cover photo... by standing the pot in a saucer of water. Amazingly enough this does the trick and it grows quite happily producing pups and a very attractive yellow inflorescence somewhat reminiscent of that of Tillandsia dyeriana. Several members now have this growing and it should be well established here in a few years. Racinaea crispa – Peter Waters

R
R
acinaea crispa is an intriguing small epiphyte inhabiting rainforest in Panama, Colombia, Peru and Ecuador. First described in 1896 as Tillandsia crispa, it was moved into the new genus, Racinaea in 1993. A mature plant is only 10cm. in height.
After several abortive attempts to grow this in New Zealand I had given up hope, when I saw a large clump in Elton Leme's greenhouse. When I enquired into his obvious success, he told me the secret was to keep it continually damp

This month we feature some very nice 'Marble Throat'hybrids from Peter Coyle.

Neoregelia 'Totara Fire Opal' Neoregelia 'Totara Candy Opal' Neoregelia 'Totara Pink Opal' Neoregelia 'Totara White Opal'
New hybrids in New Zealand...
with Andrew Devonshire
Neoregelia 'Marble Throat' is said to be a cultivar of the species Neoregelia chlorosticta. It is a very distinctive little neo with its white marble-like pattern. The plant is popular with hybridisers, as it does have the ability to pass this marbling trait onto its hybrids. However, it's not easy to create a good 'Marble Throat' hybrid! While this plant can transmit the attractive marbled pattern, it also typically washes out colours, and tends to dilute any markings from the other parent.
A few hybridists that have managed to create some attractive 'Marble Throat' hybrids are Hatsumi Maertz, Sharon Petersen and Lisa Vinzant of Hawaii, as well as Vic Przetocki, and Shane Zaghini of Australia.
During 2008 Peter hit the jackpot with his cross of Neoregelia 'Marble Throat' and Neoregelia 'Little Dazzler'. This cross resulted in a
number of great hybrids, displaying a range of colours and varying degrees of marbling. I recall seeing the group before Peter made his final selections, and I must say I would have found it very hard to narrow down the group to a few favourites. Peter has selected 4 to name and register. They all carry the Totara prefix, and this group have Opal as the suffix, to distinguish them from other Totara hybrids.
Neoregelia 'Totara Fire Opal'. The bright fiery red colouring makes this an eye catching plant.
Neoregelia 'Totara Candy Opal'.
Featuring an attractive marmorated pattern of white spotting over a rich purple leaf colour.
Neoregelia 'Totara Pink Opal'. With an almost fluorescent pink colouring, this is sure to be a popular plant.
Neoregelia 'Totara White Opal'.
This is one of my favourites, the extensive white areas, on a fresh green background give it a clean and crisp look.
If you're interested to see other 'Marble Throat'hybrids, follow the link to BCR (Bromeliad Cultivar Register) at www. bsi.org and type Marble Throat into the search field. Peter's plants will soon be added to these registered hybrids on the BCR.
Alcantarea vinicolor seed wanted. Will happily pay for the seed.
Contact Bruce 09 4227 057 0274 776646 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. We will publish Buy or Swap notices frommembers of the Society. Maximum 30 words. Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or postto: 14 Matanui St, Northcote, North Shore City.
2012 Trophy Winners

Judged over eleven monthly meetings of the Bromeliad Society. DEPHOFF TROPHY – Most points novice

Not awarded
BEA HANSON TROPHY
Most points for person who has not won a trophy before

Michelle Tohi
CENTENNIAL TROPHY – Most points overall for the year Peter Coyle

GREENOUGH TROPHY – Plant of the month competitions Peter Coyle, Judy Graham

BEA HANSON MEMORIAL TROPHY

Awarded to a member who has given outstanding service to the Society and who typifies the founding spirit and commitment of Bea Hanson. (Judged by our President and Patron)

Noelene Ritson
2012 Monthly Competition Winners
Judged over eleven monthly meetings of the Bromeliad Society. FLOwERING 1st Peter Coyle 2nd Judy Graham 3rd David Goss 40 Points 31 26 NEOREGELIA 1st Peter Coyle 70 Points 2nd Peter Waters 22 3rd David Goss 20 FOLIAGE 1st Peter Coyle 2nd John Mitchell 3rd Peter Waters 47 Points 31 25 MONTHLY CHOICE 1st Judy Graham 37 Points 2nd Peter Coyle 33 3rd John Mitchell 23 TILLANDSIA 1st Lynette Nash 2nd Win Shorrock 3rd Lester Ching 57 Points 30 20 BEST PLANT OF THE MONTH 1st = Peter Coyle 3 wins 1st = Judy Graham 3 wins MOST POINTS OVERALL 1st Peter Coyle 199 Points 2nd Judy Graham 94 3rd John Mitchell 87

Ursulaea and a three year mystery
Andy Siekkinen writing in 'The Bromeliad Blade', July 2011 – the newsletter
of The San Diego Bromeliad Society

The genus Ursulaea was proposed by H. Baensch and R. Read in 1994 in the BSI Journal and is comprised of two species that were formerly classified in the genus Aechmea (a distinction that is still being debated). The genus was named for Baensch's wife Ursula. The two species are Ursulaea macvaughii and U. tuitensis respectively, both from western Mexico. U. tuitensis is a relatively common species in our San Diego collections and it responds well to our climate.
For those of you who have not seen it, this plant is quite stiff and succulent and ranges from green to red depending on the clone and how it is treated. The leaves are broad and shiny in an open vase shape.
The other species, U. macvaughii, is much less common in our collections although it was found and published well before U. tuitensis. I am not sure whether the lack of U. macvaughii plants in our collections is due to a preference for warmer temperatures, to the fact that it is a large plant, or to whether it is just a slower grower.
Curiously, when U. tuitensis was first found it was thought to be a form of
U. macvaughii. In fact, I have recently seen a tuitensis labeled as macvaughii in a local nursery. The simplest way to tell the difference is that macvaughii has a pendulous inflorescence while tuitensis has an upright, vertical inflorescence. That difference and the larger size of macvaughii should let you distinguish them.
For a personal or more entertaining story of these plants, Robert Kopfstein once told me of a very large Aechmea he had stumbled across in a cactus nursery near Colima, Mexico. It was supposedly from that area. He had never seen before. I scratched my head and knew that the only Aechmeas in the area should have been either A. bracteata or A. mexicana, but he said it was definitely neither of those plants.
Needless to say, with that information on hand, it was time for an adventure. This year we were able to take a trip to explore a little bit of the Colima volcano region as an extension to a group trip to the Puerto Vallarta area of Jalisco which is the adjacent state to the north.
Time for an adventure...
Colima is an active volcano on the border between the states of Colima and Jalisco. It rises to 12,600 feet above sea level. A larger, but dormant cone, Nevado de Colima (14,200 ft elevation) lies just over three miles to the northeast.
Cont'd P12 11

After asking leading questions of ... these berries, which After asking leading questions of ... these berries, which Cont'd from P11 – Ursulaea and a three year mystery
We found the plant still at the nursery even after Robert's sighting of it three years before. And what a plant it was! With a large, stiff vase-shaped rosette, it was quite an impressive sight.
The nursery's larger growing area was fortunately open and we could go in and see several of these plants. With our luck there were two with inflorescences setting berries.
Unfortunately, we missed the flowers, but the young berries were interesting and gave a good show, although it was much too early for seed. As soon as we got back I started searching through descriptions to see what this could be. The berries were covered very thickly in dense white fuzz much like all of the Podaechmea subgenus of Aechmea. So, that is where I started. None of the plants in that subgenus were close to a fit (mexicana etc.) and as far as I could tell none of the berries get anywhere near the size of these berries, which were about the size of a ping pong ball.
were about the size of a ping pong ball.

friends here and around the world I realized that these plants were none other than large and well grown Ursulaea macvaughii and had no idea these plants were so large. Earlier,
I had assumed they were maybe 2 to 3 times larger than tuitensis. Now I wonder if these plants are a large clone/ ecotype or if they just grow this large when happy in their natural climate.
We have a mission...
So, Robert and I have a mission to see these large beasts growing in their native habitat as well as the hope of seeing tuitensis growing there on boulders. After searching for information on the two ursulaeas I became aware of the different types of tuitensis, including a much more narrow-leaved plant than the one I have seen in collections in San Diego.

Ursulaea mystery...

Colima – active volcano 13

At the Queensland Bromeliad Society Spring Show...
Peter and Jocelyn Coyle attended the Queensland Spring show late in 2012 and have kindly supplied these photos of some of the 'star' plants in the competition:

Vriesea ''Marshmellow' – Grand Champion. Nigel Thomson

Neoregelia 'Yin' – Reserve Champion. Cryptanthus 'Brown Sugar' – Nigel Thomson Best Cryptanthus. Nigel Thomson.

Preparing bromeliads for a Show or Sale
– Brenda Wegner, writing in the East London (South Africa) Bromeliad Society Newsletter, September 2012.Brenda has put together a thoughtful article that may be of assistance to some of our members preparing for our show at 'Cool Broms' in March 2013. A
At some stage in your gardening or bromeliad collecting career you are going to want to show off your bromeliads or perhaps put them up for sale. Here are a few pointers to make the best of the opportunity.
Culture

The pot should be clean with no salt residue around the base and suitable for the type of plant. It should not be too large or too small. It is usually easier to repot a plant into a new pot than to clean the pot.
This is a good time to select a pot size in proper proportion to the plant. A larger pot makes it easier to center the plant. Don't pot the plant too deeply. Ensure that the surface of the potting mix is clean and free from moss, slime, debris or weeds. To clean up the bromeliad, remove trapped leaves and debris by hand or a long pair of tweezers to remove deeply embedded debris. Be careful not to dig around too harshly so you don't break or tear a leaf. Loosen stubborn dirt at the base of leaves with a soft artist brush. Use a hosepipe with a nozzle that will give a good spray without too much pressure to wash out remaining dirt and debris. Wipe clean the surfaces of leaves individually.
Diluted pineapple juice or any citrus juice can be sprayed on leaves to
remove salt deposits. Just be sure to rinse the juice off well or it may leave a sticky shiny film on the plant. You can also try club soda. Some gardeners say it does not leave a film on leaves. Check the lower leaves and remove any tatty or damaged leaves carefully. Unsightly burn or other marks near the ends of the upper leaves may be removed by trimming the leaves. A sharp pair of scissors works well.
When trimming a leaf, shape it to be the same as the leaf above and this is best done a few hours prior to showing the plant so that the leaf cut is fresh and not discoloured. Cutting a leaf too far back could change the natural shape of the leaf and the plant's conformation. Trimming a plant with a brown/damaged fingernail tip is tricky. You may decide not to trim at all if it will do more harm than good to the look of the plant. Plants must be healthy and not have any pests such as scale or diseases present.
It's interesting that the inflorescence (flower spike) is not as important when a plant is judged at a show. The conformation of the plant ie the shape must comply with the known and ideal characteristics and qualities of its type and class. Plants may come from different clones and look rather similar, but some clones will be better than others.
Cont'd P16 15

Cont'd from P15 – Preparing bromeliads for a show or sale
Final evaluation before showing or selling
View the plant from all sides and from the top. Straighten the plant if necessary and firm the soil around it. Be sure the mix on top of the soil is neat. Neat appearance counts a lot. You could add an attractive ground cover such as bark or pebbles.
Ask: Does the plant appear healthy and properly grown? Does its foliage have the appropriate sheen? Are the colours
symmetry appealing and appropriate? Is the size close to maturity? Is the leaf damage inconspicuous?
Don't be overly critical. Fix what you can, but remember that there are very few, if any, perfect plants.
Transporting plants:
Take extra time packing your plants to be sure they don't damage each other or topple over in transit. Take your tools and extra potting mix with you just in
Group News rich? Are the markings clear? Is the case there's a mishap along the way. Northland Bromeliad Group
– Sandra Wheeler Our November 25th meeting was held in Dargaville at the home of Betty and Warren Mason. Jan Mahoney welcomed everyone and opened the meeting by thanking Betty and Warren for their hospitality. The garden was well established with a large variety of plants and many bromeliads. Warren was absent, waiting at their nursery in Dargaville, so our members could call on their way home for a retail fix. Twenty-
eight members were present. Mac spoke about two very spiky bromeliads he had brought along to show us. They were a Acanthostachys pitcairnioides and an Acanthostachys strobilacea (meaning pinecone-like). These plants colonise trees and rocks in Paraquay and extending into Brazil, they grow at an elevation of 800m. They are suitable for hanging baskets as long as they are out of reach as they are extremely nasty to touch. Just ask Jan. The use of a hot glue gun for attaching tillandsias to rocks and wood was questioned as to its lasting out in the
weather. Another solution suggested was to use florist wire.
The anti-spider spray we had previously been using for keeping our bromeliads looking clean and spider-free was compared to one published in the November Bromeliad Journal for dealing to mosquitoes. They both contain the same ingredients so for new members here it is again slightly refined. 500ml Sunlight dishwashing liquid, 60ml Cloudy ammonia, 60ml Dettol. All these are found in the cleaning aisle at the supermarket. To use, dilute 2 tablespoons to 1 litre of water.
Our Christmas lunch was held on
9th

Sunday December at the Kamo Club, Twenty five members attended and the prize giving for the 'Show and Tell' Competition for 2012 was held. Everyone brought along a donation for the Christmas hampers and a bromeliad and they were drawn by lucky number so no one went home empty handed.
There were eight plants in the final 'Show
1st

and Tell' competition. Neoregelia

'Karamea Alkazaar' – Maureen Green;
2nd
Neoregelia 'Inferno' – Pat Vendt; 3rd Neoregelia un-named – Jan Mahoney
Next Meeting: January 27th 2013 at Maureen Green's, 4 Tangihua Road, Maungakaramea at 1.30pm.
Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group – Jo Elder Lynley welcomed members and mentioned our bus trip to Totara Waters and to Margaret and Robert Flanagan's beautiful gardens. Everyone had a marvellous day out and we thank our hosts for their kindness and generosity. Roger Allan was our speaker and his topic: 'Plants for Free'. Roger donned his old gardening hat which he stated was a necessity whilst dealing with gardening topics and told us about propagating methods using ¼ to 1/3 hydrated coconut fibre with approximately ¾ of fine grade pumice. Hydrangea plants grown from seed; sprinkling the seeds on top of a pot containing 1/3 potting mix topped up with seed raising mix, and 1cm of sphagnum moss, cover with glass and then paper until seeds germinate. He also demonstrated layering of plants and grafting. A most informative and
amusing talk. Raffle Winners: Barbara Parnwell,

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and Maxine August, Romola Bailey, Jo Elder, Roger Allan, Isobel Hammond, David Munro, Brian Simmonds, Lynley Wilson and Orlando Gibbs. Plant of the month: Was variegated Bromeliads, and many fine plants were displayed including vrieseas, nidulariums, neoregelias and aechmeas.

Show and Tell; tabled were Dykia
marnier – lapostollei x 'Silver King', Neoregelia 'Harmony', Neoregelia 'Meyendorfii' (spineless), Aechmea distichantha, Guzmania sanguinea
1st

Novice Section: Tillandsia
2nd

gymnobotrya – Diana Durrant;
Neoregelia unknown – Doris Shea;
3rd
Neoregelia 'Red Bird' – Maisie Kokshoorn.
1st

Competition; Neoregelia olens x 'Lambert's Pride' – Gill Keesing; 2nd Vriesea fenestralis – Jo Elder; 3rd Neoregelia 'Meyendorfii (albomarginated)' – Gill Keesing.
1st

Tillandsia; Tillandsia capitata
2nd

– Cushla Chudleigh; Tillandsia aeranthos hybrid – Audrey Hewson; 3rd Tillandsia aeranthos – Bertha Schollum. Next Meeting: February 13th, at the TYPB clubrooms Sulphur Point at 12.30 pm. This meeting will be an 'Open Day for visitors and New Members'. There will be a special display and sales tables, a demonstration of removing pups from plants and spot prizes. All members are asked to help. Garden visits on 20th February starting at 10 am; 1st garden Graeme & Joy Alabaster, 23 Princess St, Te Kauri Village Katikati, 2nd visit to Gill Keesing, 30 Belmont Rise, Katikati.
Orchid Group
Our Christmas meeting was held in November at the home of Ken and Sue Laurent. 33 members, visitors and friends had a look around the garden and then enjoyed a shared lunch. Sue welcomed those present and reminded us that this was the 11th year that the group has been meeting. Several members were
Cont'd P18 17

South Auckland Bromeliad Group South Auckland Bromeliad Group Cont'd from P17 – Group News
congratulated as recipients of garden awards recognised by Pride Whakatane. Ross and Gail Fergusson won the Most Prestigious garden, Joy and John Horsborough won the Most Imaginative garden, Bill and Dianna Wardlaw won the Retired Persons garden, and Bubbles Rivett (Sue's Mum) received the award for Best Street on behalf of the residents in Berg Place. There were 10 entries in the Best Decorated Hat and 4 entries in the Xmas Table Decoration. A reminder was given to members about the start of our competition to be held each month.
Sue asked members to suggest speakers to attend our meetings next year. A trip to Tauranga to see begonias in flower, was also discussed, and the idea was well supported. Trevor and Pam Signal gave us a 'Show & Tell' display of some of their amazing plants. Raffles were drawn, and then we had Christmas presents to open and afternoon tea was served.
Next Meeting: Our first meeting of the 2013 year will be held in February at Ross and Gail Fergusson's home. For the competition members are asked to bring along the best Neoregelia that they have grown. Contact persons are Maureen Moffat 07-322 2276; Ross Fergusson 07-312 5487; Sue Laurent 07-307 1323
– Marion Morton The weather wasn't the best for our Christmas windup meeting at Nancy and Larry Murphy's place on Sunday, 2nd December. Fortunately there was a large roomy barn for us to use. It was a very lively meeting with lots of interesting plants both on the trading table and
in our Fun Auction. Our members all brought a plate of goodies for us to share and Larry Murphy cooked the bangers to perfection. He also provided us with a platter of his fresh smoked snapper garnished with his own secret dressing.
The raffles were won by May Morrison, Irene Clarke and Kathleen Carter. Many thanks to our gracious hosts for having us at their place.
The pickup times for our luxury coach trip to Onewhero are 10am on Sunday, 3rd February 2013 at the Botanic Gardens, and 10.15am at the Jolly Farmer, Drury. First stop will be the Pokeno Market where we will shop till noon. Then we go visit the home of Kim and Kathy Healey at 168 Kauri Road, Onewhero. Here we will have our regular monthly meeting and any members not on the coach trip are very welcome to join us by car at approximately 12.30pm. From there we drop in on Joyce and Eddie Fox and finish up at the home of Hawi and Susann Winter who have very recently become grandparents for the first time.
Members booked to go on our Kerikeri weekend away, 9th–10th February, will be departing the Botanic Gardens at 7am (this is the only southern pickup). North Shore pickup will be at Silverdale at approximately 7.30am. Please bring your lunch for Saturday and also munchies for the weekend, also a plant from each of us
as a thank you to our hosts.
Next Meetings: Our Sunday February 3rd meeting at Onewhero (see above notes). Our Sunday March 3rd meeting will be at 1:30pm at the home of Kevin Kilsby, 4 Weston Avenue, Mt Albert. Members are reminded to bring their mug and a chair.

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616 President: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272 Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114 Vice Presidents: Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451 Committee: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153 Don Brown 09-361 6175 Lester Ching 09-576 4595 Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671 David Cowie 09-630 8220 Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616 Chris Paterson 09-625 6707 Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt, Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366 Len Trotman, Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION
New Zealand:
Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February). Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).
Overseas:
NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012.
CORRESPONDENCE
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,
P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc. BROMELIAD JOURNAL
Deadline:
For all editorial and advertising, the first Tuesday of publication month
Editorial Committee
Dave Anderson Murray Mathieson Peter Waters
Regular Writers
Andrew Devonshire Graeme Barclay John and Agatha Lambert
Production
Murray Mathieson
Distribution
Dave Anderson
All enquiries and contributions welcome, please contact any member of the editorial committee or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Display Advertising
Rates are: Full Page $60.00 Half Page $30.00 Quarter Page $15.00
'Buy & Swap'
Listings in 'Buy & Swap' are FREE for members of the Society (max. 30 words). For advertising enquiries and material, please contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366 or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

by Graeme Barclay by Graeme Barclay This month we feature one of the oldest registered bromeliad hybrids, a plant that holds a special place in New Zealand bromeliad history.
Billbergia 'Muriel Waterman'
This plant was named after Mrs. Muriel Waterman, who was one of the first importers and collectors of bromeliads in New Zealand. In the very late 1940s she began importing plants via Mulford Foster in Florida, USA. He was one of the first growers to actively
PHOTO: G. BARCLAY Bill. 'Muriel Waterman' flower

PHOTO: G. BARCLAY Bill. 'Muriel Waterman' flower detail

hybridize bromeliad species, many of which he discovered and collected. Writing in the Bromeliad Society bulletin in 1957 Mulford Foster said;
'In naming this hybrid for Mrs. Muriel Waterman of Auckland, I am honoring her in acknowledgment of the tireless enthusiasm and interest she has shown for the bromeliads and the Bromeliad Society. Mrs. Waterman possesses -or shall we say, the largest collection of bromeliads 'Down Under' possesses Mrs. Waterman!'
The parentage of this great plant is Billbergia horrida var. tigrina x Billbergia euphemiae var. purpurea. It was made in 1946 and first flowered in 1950, revealing a large, nodding and very colourful inflorescence -the combination of both parent species. The undersides of the leaves are heavily banded in silver-grey, on a rich burgundy background. Its leaves can reach up to 50cm long in warmer climates, but are typically shorter and stubbier when grown hard in more temperate regions.
The key with this plant is to keep fertilizer to a bare minimum (if any) and to grow it in very high light or even full sun in New Zealand, otherwise the leaves will elongate and the underside colour and markings will dull considerably. It will clump well and having such attractive underside foliage makes it a fantastic plant to use in either a hanging basket, or as an epiphyte in thin canopied trees, where the silver bandings can be fully admired all year round.

FEBRUARY 2013
VOL 53 NO 2
FEBRUARY 2013
VOL 53 NO 2
Vriesea 'Hunua Orange Rocket'
John Mitchell's new hybrids • Counting down to 'Cool Broms'

CONFERENCE UPDATE
from Peter Waters, Conference Convenor

We
now
have
about
220
registrations
which
is
very
pleasing.
From
our
point
of
view
this
is
an
ideal
number
for
the
Conference.
The
greatest
number
are
from
Australia,
so
come
on
New
Zealand,
we
can
do
better.

There
is
real
pressure
on
the
bookings
for
the
Sky
Tower
dinner.
We
have
reached
our
target,
but
can
take
a
few
more
so
let
us
know
promptly
if
you
want
to
come.
There
is
no
problem
with
numbers
for
the
Friday
night
dinner.

Another
looming
problem
is
the
accommodation
at
Waipuna
Hotel.
There
are
only
8
rooms
left
at
the
special
rate
on
Saturday
night
and
about
15
on
Friday
and
Sunday.
Latecomers
will
probably
find
they
have
to
pay
considerably
more.

An
innovation
at
the
Conference
is
the
possibility
to
reserve
seating
at
a
table
for
you
and
your
friends
at
the
banquet.
Tables
take
11
seats,
so
you
only
need
to
email
me
the
names
of
your
group
and
we
will
keep
a
table
for
you.
Of
course
you
do
not
need
to
fill
all
11
places.
Email
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

A
very
popular
feature
will
be
the
Plant
Sales
opening
on
Friday
night.
There
will
be
a
great
selection
of
plants
and
something
of
interest
for
everyone.
A
raffle
will
be
held
during
Friday
and
the
prize
for
ten
lucky
people
is
the
opportunity
to
enter
the
Plant
Sales
area
15
minutes
before
opening
and
to
collect
up
to
ten
plants
each.

We
have
been
asked
about
the
ease
of
getting
a
phytosanitary
certificate
for
those
wanting
to
take
plants
home.
The
short
answer
is
that
it
is
not
easy.
The
officials
will
not
come
to
the
Conference
as
they
do
in
some
other
countries.
There
is
only
one
place
to
get
a
certificate,
near
the
airport,
and
it
is
not
open
in
the
weekends.
You
also
need
an
appointment.
We
have
wised
them
up
and
they
are
keeping
Monday
and
Tuesday
from
9.30
until
2pm
free
for
us.
You
will
need
to
clean
your
plants
thoroughly
as
they
inspect
every
single
one
and
will
not
provide
the
certificate
if
they
find
anything.
The
cost
will
be
at
least
$175
and
payment
is
by
credit
card.
For
an
appointment
call
Carla
on
09-257-0699.
We strongly recommend that before leaving home, you find out your country's
requirements for plant imports.

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc
Bromeliad Journal – Feburary 2013 issue
CONTENTS
'Cool Broms' Conference update... 2
President's Page – Jocelyn Coyle 4
We need your help! – the editorial team 4
Bromeliad Society January meeting news – Dave Anderson 5
'Buy & Swap' 6
April one day sale 7
New hybrids in New Zealand – Andrew Devonshire 8
Tillandsia albertiana – Jo Elder 10
What's in a name? – Alice H. Quinn 11
Reminders... 12
Group News 13
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 14
Hechtia matudae photo – Adolfo Espejo-Sema 15
Classic Brom Corner – Graeme Barclay 16

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 13 for details of group meeting
times and venues.

FEBRUARY 13th Bay of Plenty Group meeting.
26th Society monthly meeting at 20th Bay of Plenty Group garden visits
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden 15th – 18th 'Cool Broms' Bromeliad
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. Conference at Waipuna Hotel and
Monthly choice competition: Billbergias. Conference Centre, Auckland.
There will be a preview of the 'Cool 26th Society monthly meeting at
Broms' conference. Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden

and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
MARCH Monthly choice competition: Aechmea

3rd

South Auckland Group meeting. fasciata and hybrids.

FRONT COVER: This month we are excited to be able to show you some sparkling
new hybrids that have been created by BSNZ member John Mitchell. You can see
them in Andrew Devonshire's regular column on page 8. On the cover we feature
John's Vriesea 'Hunua Orange Rocket'.

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Hi everyone. Well what can I say.
I feel like a piece of toast with
all this heat, the lawn crunches
under your feet as you walk on it and
the garden is full of huge cracks and
screaming out for some rain, using
sprinklers is just not the same. The only
plus is that I only have to pick up leaves
from about 10 poplars instead of the 60
that were there last summer.

Our 'Cool Broms' conference is coming
up really fast and it's very exciting as
things are being finalised and falling into
place. The conference committee has
put a lot of time and planning into this
over the last 3 years so I hope everyone
who attends has a great time and goes
away with a bit more knowledge and
new friends. I hope you are getting your
show plants ready. All members are
welcome to enter plants and to call into

Waipuna Hotel and conference Centre to
look at the show plants and check out the
bromeliad displays.

You have all had your Neoregelia
'Africa' F2 seedlings for 12 months now
so bring them along and we can compare
the colours and growing habits.

We will be having en evening packed full
of interesting information on Tuesday
February 26 – Diana Holt is bring some
of her home bred minis (that was a
lovely bunch on the silent auction table
last month), Alan Cliffe will be talking to
us about bugs on our plants and last but
not least Andrew Maloy will share his
thoughts on a topic he has researched .

Take care.

Jocelyn

We like to see members' gardens, plants
and stories in our Journal!
We're always trying to maintain
the local New Zealand content
of our Journal and keep the
reprinting of material from overseas
bromeliad journals to a minimum –
only using articles from overseas that
we think will be of genuine interest and
value to our members.

The problem is we are not getting
enough quality New Zealand material
and members will notice that for the
first time for a year or two we are only
running 16 pages in this February issue.
It's summer and our members' gardens
and plants will never be looking better.
Now is the time we'd like to arrange

for someone to visit your garden and
gather some good material for the
Journal. Note: you don't have to write or
photograph the plants yourself – just let
us know about your garden (or a willing
friend's garden) and we will try and
make the arrangements. We'd love to
be able to get a good number of articles
'in the bank' for use through the coming
winter months, when members always
say, 'don't visit my garden in winter!'

If you can help please contact one of
the editorial team -Murray Mathieson:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; Peter
Waters: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; Dave
Anderson: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Bromeliad Society
January Meeting News – Dave Anderson

Jocelyn Coyle chaired the meeting
and welcomed members and
visitors. The 'Cool Broms'
Conference is less than 2 months away
so if you have not already booked to
attend the 'Cool Broms' conference
please do so as soon as possible. The
annual show competition is being held
at the conference and is open to all
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand
members even if not attending the
conference. All members – please
enter your plants! If you intend to sell
plants at 'Cool Broms' they must be
of a very high quality. Jocelyn asked
how members' Neoregelia 'Africa' F2
seedlings, that were given out a year
ago, were growing and to please bring
them in next month. Finally please note
that annual subscriptions are due at the
end of February with a $5 discount
applying to those who pay before the
end of the month.

Peter Waters once again took us
through the 'Show and Tell' plants.
First up for display was a Vriesea
delicatula with the owner wanting to
know why there were 4 flower spikes
coming from the centre rosette? Peter
said that, unusually, this plant had
4 extra small plants sitting in the
cup that had given rise to the flower
spikes. Next was a plant identified as
Nidularium 'Madonna' notated on the
BSI website:

Nidularium 'Madonna' Rehak, Jarka*
1997: cv. of unknown parentage –
(Other cv. = 'Miranda'?) – Butcher
said, "Grown from seed in NSW

allegedly from Seidel circa 1980 –
has suggestions of a large innocentii
but has a scape 6" long – primary
bracts start out white but become
bright red at anthesis – white petals

– the inflorescence threatens to fall
over because the scape is so long".
Ref: Illawarra Bromeliad Society
Newslink, July 2009. Discovered
and named by J. and N. Rehak, circa
1982-83 at a North Shore, Sydney AU
nursery in uniform seed batch (ex A.
Seidel, Brazil).Upright scape to 15cm
long, inflorescence 6cm long. Sibling
seedling with Nid. Miranda.
Next for display were two forms of the
plant of Tillandsia 'Wildfire' one being
much larger than the other. ANeoregelia
'Painted Delight' x 'Clarise' grown
from frozen seed was shown with the
owner enquiring whether using frozen
seed was common. The answer was
that it was quite common to freeze
seed in Holland, being best to do so by
'Blast Freezing' using liquid nitrogen
that did not allow the ice crystals to
grow within the seed. A Neoregelia
'Maggie's Pride' was identified by its
distinctive colours. The quite common
Vriesea vagans was identified by its
vagrant flower spike. A tillandsia with
white petals, wanting identification
was thought be either vernicosa or
didisticha with the softer foliage
leaning towards the latter name. Lastly
for display was Tillandsia compressa.
It is going to take a PhD student to sort
these fasciculata type plants out as so
many of them look so similar.

Cont'd P6

Cont'd from P5 – Bromeliad Society January Meeting News

Following the 'Show and Tell', Dave
Anderson gave a PowerPoint display
of a recent tour through Mexico.

Donna Cramond won the special
raffle. The door prizes went to Nancy
Murphy, David Goss and Lester Ching.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First David Goss
with Billbergia 'Golden Joy' – a most
attractive clump of plants that does
look great at this time of year. Nancy
Murphy was second with Aechmea
flavorosea x fasciata a very attractive
hybrid. Also in the competition were
Aechmea 'Sangria' and 'Pink Rocket';
Canistrum triangulare; Neoregelia
'Yin', 'Yang' and 'Takemura' x
'Painted Desert'; Nidularium rutilans,
'Ruby Lee' and Vriesea x 'Poelmanii'.
Open Foliage: First equal were Peter
Coyle with a Neoregelia carcharodon
'Rainbow' x 'Silver' and Nancy

Murphy with Vriesea hieroglyphica x
'White Chestnut'. In the competition
were Aechmea spectabilis; Neoregelia
'Black Knight'; xNeomea 'Strawberry';
Quesnelia 'Tim Plowman' and Vriesea
bleherae, 'Connections' and 'Solar
Flare'.
Tillandsia: David Anderson was first
with Tillandsia 'Maya' - a Guatemalan
natural hybrid of Tillandsia
xerographica x capitata that looked
stunning. Second was Bev Ching with
Tillandsia 'White Spice'. There were
also on the table Tillandsia xcorrealei,
beutelspacheri x flabellata, capitata
'Peach', lucida, latifolia, leiboldiana
and 'Mr Toot'.
Neoregelia: Jocelyn Coyle was first
with Neoregelia 'Apricot Nectar'

x 'Jewellery Shop'. Second was
Michelle Tohi with a Neoregelia
'Ed Prince'. In the competition were
Neoregelia pauciflora, 'Blushing
Tiger', 'Pink Volcano', 'Starry Eyed',
'Big Star' x 'Big Bing', 'Break of Day'
x 'Gold Lotto', 'Rosy Morn', 'Ritzy',
and 'Tara Tiger'.

Named Monthly Plant (Aechmea
nudicaulis & its hybrids): First was
David Goss with Aechmea nudicaulis
'Silver Streak' followed by Lester
Ching with Aechmea nudicaulis var.
capitata. In the competition were
Aechmea nudicaulis (variegated),
'Aequalis', 'Black' and 'Mary Hyde'.

The Plant of the month went to David
Anderson was first with Tillandsia
'Maya'.

Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING: Tuesday 26th
February.

WANTED TO BUY

Blooming Bromeliadsby Baensch+Baensch.
English Version.

Contact Diana Durrant
phone: 07-5524782
email:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

We will publish Buy or Swap notices from
members of the Society. Maximum 30 words.
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or postto: 14 Matanui St, Northcote, North Shore City.

See you there!
BROMELIAD SALE
OUR ONE DAY ONLY
Sunday April 7th
Open to public
9.00am to 3.00pm
FREE ENTRY
Mt Eden War Memorial Hall
489 Dominion Road, Balmoral, Auckland.
(Members please note: Because of the
'Cool Broms' conference there is no
'Fiesta' this year and the
Annual Show is being held
as part of 'Cool Broms')
BROMELIAD SALE
OUR ONE DAY ONLY
Sunday April 7th
Open to public
9.00am to 3.00pm
FREE ENTRY
Mt Eden War Memorial Hall
489 Dominion Road, Balmoral, Auckland.
(Members please note: Because of the
'Cool Broms' conference there is no
'Fiesta' this year and the
Annual Show is being held
as part of 'Cool Broms')

This month we are fortunate
to preview the first group of
John Mitchell's hybrids to be
named and registered. John has been
hybridising since 2005, and he was
featured during our hybridising series
(see the full article in our September
2010 Journal). John has a disciplined
approach to hybridising, and he sets
very high standards, resulting in top
quality plants.

This initial group will give a taste of
what John has in the pipeline... I've
also seen a few of his as yet unnamed
hybrids, and I can tell you that vriesea
fans are in for a treat.

John has chosen the prefix of 'Hunua'
for naming his hybrids. Hunua is a
beautiful area of Auckland, home to the
Hunua Ranges, and the Hunua Falls,

so this is a fitting prefix to distinguish
John's stunning new plants.

Vriesea 'Hunua Embers': John has
featured this plant in his hybridising
program, and it is definitely worthy of
a name. John's research has indicated
that the plant most likely originated
from Len Trottman around 1990.

Vriesea 'Hunua Orange Rocket':
(Vriesea 'Pacific Blush' x Vriesea
'Hunua Embers')

Vriesea 'Hunua Blizzard': (Vriesea
'Kiwi Sunset' x Vriesea 'Vista')

Billbergia 'Hunua Berry Fizz':
(Billbergia 'Domingos Martins'
x [Billbergia amoena viridis
horrida])
Photos by John Mitchell.

Vriesea 'Hunua Embers'

John Mitchell's new hybrids...

Vriesea 'Hunua Blizzard'

Vriesea 'Hunua Orange Rocket' Billbergia 'Hunua Berry Fizz'

Tillandsia albertiana Tillandsia albertiana
Tillandsia
albertiana

This beautiful Tillandsia
albertiana grows in the garden
of Jo Elder. Tauranga. The
clump must be 15-20 years old and 30
x 42 centimetres in size. It has been
growing on the outside wall of the
shade house for all that time apart from
a week or two in a different position
where the plant showed signs of stress
and was promptly moved back to the
place it was previously happy in. The
clump has beautiful red flowers on it
from December through to May each
year.

What's in a name?

– By Alice H. Quinn from Alajuela, Costa Rica is reprinted from the September
1997 newsletter of the Bromeliad Society of Broward County, Inc.
The bromeliad family has been
a privileged one, at least in the
English speaking world. With
very few exceptions, the botanical
names derived from members are
names by which they are known:
Aechmea, Billbergia, Tillandsia,
Hechtia, Guzmania, etc.

One appreciates the system of
botanical nomenclature even more
when confronted with the problem
of securing a particular plant in a
foreign country. Common names
of plants create an exasperating
confusion everywhere. Costa Rica is
no exception. There are probably more
common names per plant and even
more plants per common name here in
Costa Rica than there are in the United
States.

Sometimes a common name in Spanish
translates into about the same one for the
identical one in English. An example
would be Euphorbia milii commonly
known as 'Crown of Thorns.' In
Costa Rica, it is known in spanish as
'Coronade Christo." (Incidentally, E.
milii is used extensively here as barrier
hedges, growing beautifully and
profusely with exuberant blooming.)

The common name 'Flame of the
Forest' for Spathodea campanulata
is the same in Spanish –'Llama del
Bosque'. But the same tree also has
another common name: 'African
Tulip Tree' in English while Llama

del Bosque is also applied to some
other plants. And in English, 'Flame
of the Forest' is also attached to Butea
monosperma.

Examples of even greater confusion
could easily be cited in either Spanish
or English common names, as used in
the United States or Costa Rica. Add
to those the different common names
used for these same plants in other
Spanish speaking countries and the
nomenclature is totally out of hand!

In the United States, with the great
mushrooming of nurseries and plant
shops selling ornamental plants
for the home, an unfortunate trend
has developed. Commercial plant
vendors (not dedicated knowledgeable
nurserymen) have labeled plants with
cute names, or fanciful names, or justeasy-
to-say names. 'Creeping Charlie'
(an ugly name for an attractive bit of
hanging greenery) has been given to
three different plants, none of which
are in the same genus as the other:
Lysimachus, Pilea and in California
only, a Plectranthus.

The bromeliad family, having a more
recent introduction into ornamental
cultivation in the United States, got
off to a reasonably untarnished start.
You could ask for an Aechmea fasciata
or a Billbergia pyramidalis and know
there would be no confusing it with
any other plant of the same name.
Commercialisation, though, has begun

Cont'd P12 11

Cont'd from P11 – What's in a name?

to muddy up our nomenclature. We
are now finding such contrived names
as 'Pheasant Leaf', 'Zebra Plant' and
'Heart of Flame' – all of which has
been applied to plants in other families
as well.

All of this is not to say we disapprove
of a little wit, whimsy, or imagination
in naming new hybrids. For instance,
Aechmea 'By Golly' is the correct
registered name of that beautiful
hybrid by Erwin Wurthmann. Nobody
should call it anything else. (But try
pronouncing it in Spanish!)

Any plant lover seriously interested
in the bromeliad family should at
least learn the correct name of the

• Membership
SubsfortheyearMarch1sttoFebruary28th,2014arenowdue.IfyoupaybyFebruary28th2013youwillreceivethe$5.00reductionforasinglesubscription–
from$35.00to$30.00.
• Conference
It'sstillnottoolatetoenrolforthe2013'CoolBroms'conferenceinAucklandMarch15thto18th.Pleaserefertopage2ofthisJournal.
• One day April Sale
ThiswillbeheldonSundayApril7thattheMtEdenWarMemorialHall.Pleaserefertopage7ofthisJournal.
REMINDERS...
bromels in his/her collection. It's easy
and logical as learning the names of
people – your friends and those whom
you respect and admire. Vendors
should label plants with their correct
botanical names. Botanical names
open up a world of information to
you too because they often tell you
something descriptive about the plant.
For instance, Guzmania sanguinea:
the genus was named for a person by
the name of Guzman and the species
name tells us it is reddish – 'washed
with blood'. So you see, there is much
in a botanical name. Let's keep our
bromeliad family's nomenclature pure

– unconfused and uncontaminated
with phony childish names that could
apply to dozens of unrelated species.

Group News

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Jo Elder
Our last meeting for 2012 was a
Christmas luncheon at the home of Jo
and Bruce Elder. Prior to lunch members
visited the lovely garden of Tom and
Heather Slee. It was a bright sunny
day and the 50 members who attended
enjoyed the delicious Pot Luck lunch
and the opportunity to have a good chat.

Next Meeting: March 13th, at TYPB
clubrooms Sulphur Point at 12.30 pm.
This will be our AGM and will be
followed by a 'Fun Auction' (a great
success last year). Please look in your
cupboards and around your garden for
suitable auction items. Bids are at $1.00
and increments thereof. Don't forget to
bring along some money! There will be
no plant of the month or sales table

Garden Visits: 20th March starting at
10.00am 1. Triny Edge 114 Russley
drive, Bayfair, Mount Maunganui 2.
Toni and Marcel Authier, 39 Lotus
Ave, Mount Maunganui. There is the
possibility of a third garden to visit at
Bayfair.This will be confirmed later.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
We had an overcast day for our first
meeting of the year and it was great
weather for travelling. Our first stop
was the Pokeno Markets, and ice creams
were the order of the day.

We then proceeded to the garden of
Joyce and Eddie Fox. It is always a
delight to visit their garden which is so
colourful and interesting. The next door

neighbour's kitten was also visiting and
got thoroughly spoilt.

Then we had our meeting at the garden
of Kathy and Kim Healey. They
have some very unusual plants, well
established trees and a beautiful big lake
on which they keep black swans. Various
prominent sculptures are scattered
around the property. The garden was
very peaceful and cool under the shade
of the trees.

Our next stop was Hawi and Susann
Winter at Pukekawa. It is amazing what
they have both accomplished since
purchasing the property almost 25 years
ago. We noticed many changes since our
last visit and Hawi's handiwork is very
much in evidence throughout the garden,
while the bromeliads are thriving in his
pottery pots.

We were very sorry to learn that Audrey
Calthaux had recently passed away and
our condolences go out to Dawn and
Eric Ashton and family.

Graham West mentioned that the
inaugural meeting of the South Auckland

Bromeliad Group was held ten years
ago on 1 February 2003 at which 20
members attended. Our numbers have
substantially increased over the past 10
year period. Graham has also helped
some of the other northern bromeliad
groups get set up.

The raffles were won by Marion Morton,
Pat Lawson and David Thomson.

Next Meeting: Sunday, 3rd March at
1:30pm at the home of Kevin Kilsby, 4
Weston Avenue, Mt Albert. Please bring
a mug and a chair.

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
President: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272 Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Vice Presidents: Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451 Committee: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Don Brown 09-361 6175 Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671 David Cowie 09-630 8220
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616 Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt, Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366
Len Trotman, Patricia Sweeney,
Peter Waters

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Regular Writers

Andrew Devonshire
Graeme Barclay
John and Agatha Lambert

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

'Buy & Swap'

Listings in 'Buy & Swap' are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Hechtia matudae Hechtia matudae
We had to show you this...

A stunning photograph of Hechtia matudae. This photo appeared in
the Illawarra Bromeliad Society 'Newslink' in October 2012. The
photograph was taken by Adolfo Espejo-Sema and it has appeared
in the BSI Journal in 2008.

Hechtia matudae

It is found on cliffs and crags of volcanic rocks where it forms extensive
colonies. The species is known from the states of México and Morelos,
Mexico, growing between 1700 and 1900 m elevation. The size, abundance,
colour, and delicate scent of the flowers make it a plant with great ornamental
potential.

by Graeme Barclay by Graeme Barclay
February is the time of year many Neo's are flowering and looking great. This large
hybrid has developed into a true classic, but it also has a very mysterious history.

Neoregelia 'Rosy Morn'

It's not often we find such a large
and popular hybrid that has so many
"unknowns" about its origin. What
we do know, is that around the early
1980's Amazon Nursery in NSW,
Australia imported a batch of seed
from the USA, which purportedly
came from a plant of Neoregelia
'Morrisoniana'. The exact origin of the
seed and whether in fact it was naturally
"self-set", or purposely hybridized
by someone, remains a mystery.

The resulting seedlings were sold off to
the public in Australia under the name
'X Morrisoniana', but this eventually
caused much confusion, as the original
'Morrisoniana' (which is a very early
Mulford Foster hybrid) is quite different
and a much smaller plant. As we know, a
hybrid grex will show some differences
between seedlings, therefore various
looking plants entered circulation under
the same name. In the early 1990's, it was
decided that the plants were deserving
of their own name, but because there

PHOTO: G. BARCLAY
Neoregelia 'Rosy Morn'

were a number of different variants
that looked similar that no-one could
accurately identify, the name Neoregelia
'Rosy Morn' would be applied as a
"grex name" to all offspring. This
explains why some Rosy Morn's we see
around (particularly in Australia), may
look slightly different to one another.
Some appear to be larger, redder or more
spotted underneath that others, but they
nearly all have the stunning hot-pink
centre blush and patches of "bubbled
ribs" on their leaves, which is a good
feature to identify it amongst other Neo's.
The consensus now is that 'Rosy Morn'
is likely a hybrid with the parents of
'Morrisoniana' x cruenta - or something
similarly as large as cruenta. Once again,
we will never know for sure unless
DNA analysis is done at some stage.

Neoregelia 'Rosy Morn' is a large plant,
reaching around a metre in diameter
when fully mature. It is an excellent
garden subject that grows well in high
light or dappled shade, but also can take
near full sun year round in New Zealand.
One endearing feature is the spotty pups
turn from light green to a lovely apricot/
pink hue almost all over, if they are
potted up and grown in very high filtered
light from a young age. This makes them
great to have in sunny spots in the garden
where they will transform into large, flat
mature specimens with wide, bronzy
coloured leaves at flowering time. That
is when the hot-pink centre begins to
glow for 2-3 months and becomes a real
show-stopper!

 

 

March 2013
VOL 53 NO 3
Tropicana… at Kerikeri. We visit Jim and Wendy Matthews. Photo: Erin Titmus.
March 2013
VOL 53 NO 3
Tropicana… at Kerikeri. We visit Jim and Wendy Matthews. Photo: Erin Titmus.
In the impressive theatre at theWaipuna Conference Centre
A traditional New Zealand welcome
Brian Simmonds of Tauranga
won the ‘Champion of the Show’award with his Tillandsia tectorum
José Manzanares
from Ecuador –
one of our keynote
presenters
Part of the NZ Hybrids display
Lunchtime chat – Andrew
Raff from Melbourne (left)
with Auckland’s Hawi
Winter
A small section of the large Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand display
In the impressive theatre at theWaipuna Conference Centre
A traditional New Zealand welcome
Brian Simmonds of Tauranga
won the ‘Champion of the Show’award with his Tillandsia tectorum
José Manzanares
from Ecuador –
one of our keynote
presenters
Part of the NZ Hybrids display
Lunchtime chat – Andrew
Raff from Melbourne (left)
with Auckland’s Hawi
Winter
A small section of the large Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand display
John Crawford and Julie Hewetson
show their Gold Coast colours
Photos by Murray Mathieson and andrew
devonshire. More Photos and More ‘Cool
broMs’ news in aPril Journal.

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc
Bromeliad Journal – March 2013 issue
CONTENTS
‘Cool Broms’ first photos… 2
President’s Page – Jocelyn Coyle 4
Bromeliad Society February meeting news – Dave Anderson 5
Far North Bromeliad Group celebrates 10 years – Erin Titmus 7
Tropicana… at Kerikeri – Erin Titmus 8
Bromeliad Society One Day Sale 10
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 11
The Eden Project in Cornwall, England – Billy Gerretsen 12
Photos from Society’s February meeting – Peter Coyle 14
Billbergias becoming more popular – Peter Coyle 15
Group News 15
Classic Brom corner – Graeme Barclay 20

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 15 for details of group meeting

times and venues.

MARCH
24th Northland Group AGM
26th Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
Alan Cliffe will speak on bugs and sprays.
‘Cool Broms’ show winners on display.
The Monthly Choice competition:
Aechmea fasciata and hybrids.


APRIL
6th / 7th Far North Group trip to Auckland


7th

Bromeliad Society one day
sale – Mt Eden War Memorial Hall,
489 Dominion Road, Balmoral. 9.00am
to 3.00pm.

7th

South Auckland Group meeting
10th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
17th Bay of Plenty Group garden visits
23rd Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
The Monthly Choice competition: Best
white plants.

FRONT COVER: This month we go up to the far north and visit Jim and Wendy
Matthews’ beautiful Tropicana garden, overlooking the Kerikeri inlet. Our cover
features Neo. johannis as the base of an attractive layered-up scene. Thanks to
Erin Titmus for the photos and the article – see page 8.

PRESIDENT’S PAGE

Hello everyone. By the time
that you read this the ‘Cool
Broms’ conference will be
well and truly over and I will be
coming up for air. I would like to
extend a huge thank you to everyone
who has helped us prepare and run
this major bromeliad event. Your
collective commitment and effort over
many months has been amazing and
I’m confident the conference will have
been a huge success.

The next conference in two years time
will be in Sydney so hopefully we’ve
set them a really high standard to try
and match.

The stress of this long hot summer
has definitely been very harsh on our
plants. The bromeliads are looking
very bleached and I am sick of moving
sprinklers around the garden and you
know it is just not the same as hours
of nice steady rain. I think most of the
plants have got the stage where they
are screaming out, ‘I have had enough,
please just give me some rain’.

We have just had a new house built
to house Peter’s billbergias that he
has been busy hybridising. He just
loves them and he is always putting
one in front of me and saying ‘look
at the shape of these leaves’, ‘look at
the colour’, ‘look at the spots’, ‘look
at these markings’. I think he will be
spending a lot of his time in this new
‘Billy House’.

Our Society’s big one day sale will
held on Sunday April 7th, so if you
wish to reserve a table to sell plants,
please let me know as soon as possible.

At our March meeting Alan Cliffe will
speak on bugs and sprays and we will
also be showing you the winning plants
from the ‘Cool Broms’ conference.
And a reminder – because of the timing
of our ‘Cool Broms’ conference, our
AGM, which is normally held in
March will now be our April meeting.

Take care.

Jocelyn

Bromeliad Society
February Meeting News – Dave Anderson

President Jocelyn chaired the
meeting and welcomed members
and visitors, then spoke about
the ‘Cool Broms’ conference coming
up fast in March. The Society’s
annual competition will be held at the
Waipuna Hotel during the conference
and all members are encouraged to
enter their plants even if not attending
the conference. Please bring in your
competition plants on Friday 15th
between 10.00am and 1.00pm. The
show will be judged by overseas judges
attending the conference. Nancy
Murphy is putting on the society’s
display and wants plants dropped in to
the hotel before 2.00pm on Thursday
14th. Do make sure your plants are well
named and pick them up after 3.00pm
on Monday 18th.

Peter Waters once again took us
through the ‘Show and Tell’ plants.
First up for display was an albino plant
belonging to the Neoregelia ‘Milagro’,
‘Hot Gossip’ grex. Unfortunately
these albino plants die very quickly
from lack of chlorophyll once they
are removed from the mother plant.
Next was a Neoregelia ‘Picolo’ with
the owner saying that it had produced
numerous pups. A member said that
you can get between 30 and 40 pups
from this hybrid. Lastly a plant wanting
identification was thought to be the
hybrid Neoregelia ‘Sweet Nellie’.

Jocelyn had asked everyone at the
January meeting to bring in their plants

of Neoregelia ‘Africa’ F2 that were
given out a year ago. As one would
expect from an F2 hybrid there was
tremendous variation in the colour of
the plants and also in the size of them

– quite a show.
Diana Holt then gave a talk on the
hybrids that she has been making since
2006 and what a wonderful lot they
were being mainly neoregelia minis.
Andrew Maloy then gave an interesting
talk on ‘cell burst’ in plants that cause
blemishes on the leaves and what one
can do to reduce this happening.

Sharon Keller won the special raffle.
The door prizes went to Donna
Cramond, Ed Foot and Hazel Foot.

COMPETITIONS


Open Flowering: First equal were
Peter Coyle with Aechmea fasciata
‘Clara’– an attractive cultivar with
pale green leaves and a white flower
and John Mitchell with Aechmea
fasciata ‘Kiwi’ an old NZ grown
seedling that has red stripe down the
leaves. Also in the competition were
Aechmea fasciata purpurea, ‘Madge’,
‘Azur Nigra’; Billbergia ‘Domingos
Martins’; Guzmania sanguinea
‘Tricolor’; Nidularium fulgens,
(innocentii x rutilans); Orthophytum
gurkenii and Vriesea ‘Golden Legend’.
Open Foliage: Peter Coyle was first
equal again with his Vriesea ‘Forest’
and John Mitchell with Aechmea
orlandiana ‘Pickaniny’. This latter

Cont’d P6

Cont’d from P5 – Bromeliad Society February Meeting News

plant is beautiful with its green
leaves having dark purple brushed
patches. In the competition were
Neoregelia ‘Empress’, ‘Exotica Pink
Panther’ and ‘Ruby Frost’; Quesnelia
‘Tim Plowman’ and Vriesea ‘Tartan
Princess’, Tasman hybrid, ‘Dark
Knight’ x ‘Candyman’ and ‘Yellow
Wave’.
Tillandsia: Lester Ching was first with
Tillandsia disticha - a plant with a long
thin spike and yellow flowers. Second
was David Anderson with Tillandsia
funckiana. There were also on the table
Tillandsia fasciculata, latifolia var
leucophylla, ‘Te Ngakau’, yunckeri,
capitata and multicaulis.
Neoregelia: Peter Coyle was first with
Neoregelia ‘24 Carat’ and David Goss
shared the first place with a Neoregelia
‘Jewellery Shop’. In the competition
were Neoregelia lilliputiana, smithii
x ‘Blushing Tiger’ x ‘Cheers’,
‘Cayenne’, ‘Little Faith’, ‘Ed Prince’,

‘Gold Medal’, ‘Jeffery Block’,
‘Medallion’, and ‘Garnish’.

Named Monthly Plant (Billbergia
and hybrids): First was David
Anderson with Billbergia ‘Domingos Martins’ followed by Judy Graham
with the same plant. In the competition
were Billbergia amoena var. viridis x horrida, three clumps of ‘Golden Joy’,
several clumps of ‘Hallelujah’, ‘Ralph Graham French’, ‘Domingos Martins’ x ‘C’est Bon’, ‘Domingos Martins’ x ‘Hallelujah’, ‘Domingos Martins’ x vittata, ‘Evita’, ‘Pink Champagne’ and ‘White Double’.

The Plant of the month went to Peter
Coyle with Neoregelia ‘24 Carat’.

Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING: Tuesday 26th
March.

AUTUMN SALE
Friday 12th and Saturday 13th April
9am – 4pm
89 ToTArA roAd, WhenuApAi.

Far North Bromeliad Group celebrates


10 years – Erin Titmus

February 10, and we gathered abuzz
for our celebration of the tenth
anniversary of the group’s founding
on 15 November 2002. The seating soon
filled on the lawn under the shade of the
large pin oak and we enjoyed catching
up with familiar friends, those we had
not seen a while and with our guests
from South Auckland and Whangarei.

Poppy and David had the entrance
gardens and plant house displays looking
a picture. Poppy’s whanau were busy ‘out
back’ preparing a sumptuous feast for us
all. The delicious luncheon was served
seemingly effortlessly as we filed by
generous helpings of pork, roast veges,
salad greens, bread and trimmings. We
lined up again to an amazing array of
dessert dishes supplied by members.

Bill Lee welcomed everyone and
explained that we had delayed our
celebration so that we could share the
day with a larger gathering of guests.

In remembering the first meeting, Bill
announced that the committee wanted
to acknowledge the contribution of our
founder members: David Brewer, John
and Colleen Frew, Vai Geddes (deceased),
Poppy Fuller, Len (deceased) and Pat
Hart, Leo and Pru Helleur, Claudia
Lomas, Norma and Vicki Midgley, Judy
Morecombe, Wini Pepene, Avon Ryan
(deceased), Viv Shortland, Grant and
Pauline Sutherland, Graham and Pat
West.

Bill presented each founder member
present with a new name tag, denoting
their status as Life Members, and with

a photograph of the group taken at
that inaugural gathering at Grant and
Pauline’s property, then on SH10.

A group of founder members:
(from left) – Poppy Fuller, Pauline Grant,
Norma Midgley, David Brewer, Vicki
Midgley, Viv Shortland


David then introduced Graham West who
was President of the Bromeliad Society
of New Zealand back in 2002. We had
adopted many of his ideas to help make
our Far North Group successful. Graham
thanked us for inviting him back and
shared memories of our early days.

Our second surprise was the presentation
of a beautifully iced celebratory cake
made by David’s daughter, Rhonda. The
cake was cut by a group of the founder
members and shared among all those
present.

About 85 plants were given out through
the raffle and the auction was so well
supported that stewards had to ensure the
cream of the 45 plants were prioritised to
allow our guests the opportunity to bid
before they had to depart on the bus to
Auckland.

Tropicana photos… Tropicana photos…

Tropicana… at Kerikeri

– Article and photos by Erin Titmus
When Jim and Wendy Matthews
moved to their property
with expansive views over
Kerikeri Inlet, just over seven years
ago, the garden was minimalist. The
main feature was box hedging and
there were a few palms planted along
the infinity line of the back lawn.

Today the property befits its name,
Tropicana, with extensive plantings
creating an oasis that immediately
relaxes a visitor into ‘holiday mode’,
even if the visit is only for a short time.
Wendy is the keen gardener and Jim
looks after the watering systems
and painting. She joined the Palm
Society in Auckland over 20 years
ago and began to exchange palms for
bromeliads from Maureen Green in
Whangarei. So it was natural to choose
this theme for the B&B Wendy and
Jim ran for four years.

‘You look outside and you could be in
Fiji,’ says Wendy. ‘I like greenery and
colour in the middle of winter. With
broms you still have colour when it is
raining and cold – and colour means
happy.’

The site is north facing with free
draining volcanic ground. To the south

.
Garden scene created on concrete pad.

.
A three year old corner gardendisplays broms with leafy greens.

.
Tillandsias thrive on heat from a
concrete column.

.
Vriesea ‘Dark Knight’ naturalises in
dappled shade.

there is a planting of tall trees that
provide overhang to protect from frost,
dappled light for the shade-loving
plants and a microclimate for the
remainder of the garden.

Wendy created windows of view by
planting smaller gardens at intervals
along the top lawn. She creates
interest in these plots by starting
with a focal tall plant (often a palm)
and then layering down in levels to
develop depth. This works even on a
concrete area by using plants in pots
of varying heights and then softening
off the base with driftwood, flotsam,
rocks, or tillandsia clumps to make the
whole scene look like a garden. Wendy
highlights the effectiveness of using
leafy greens with palms and broms
for texture: vireya branches, crucifix
orchids and even green kitchen herbs
poking through with splashes of colour
too.

Upright structures are merged into
the garden by adding a layer of brush
cladding for the plants to naturalise
over. A plastered column of the house
features Wendy’s tillandsia collection
and plants flourish from the heat stored
by day and released overnight. Rocks
provide the same benefits when used
around the garden.

Now the garden is mature Wendy
is enjoying creating shallow trough
gardens with miniature neos and
cryptanthus – a new outlet for her
artistic flair for composition and
placement.


BroMeLiAd SALe
our one dAY onLY
Sunday April 7th
open to public
9.00am to 3.00pm
Free enTrY
Mt eden War Memorial hall
489 dominion road, Balmoral, Auckland.
(Members please note: Because of the
‘Cool Broms’ conference there is
no ‘Fiesta’ this year and the
Annual Show is being held
as part of ‘Cool Broms’)
BroMeLiAd SALe
our one dAY onLY
Sunday April 7th
open to public
9.00am to 3.00pm
Free enTrY
Mt eden War Memorial hall
489 dominion road, Balmoral, Auckland.
(Members please note: Because of the
‘Cool Broms’ conference there is
no ‘Fiesta’ this year and the
Annual Show is being held
as part of ‘Cool Broms’)

OFFICERS


Patron: Patricia Sweeney Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
President: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272 Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Vice Presidents: Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451 Committee: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Don Brown 09-361 6175 Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671 David Cowie 09-630 8220
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616 Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt, Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366
Len Trotman, Patricia Sweeney,
Peter Waters

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Regular Writers

Andrew Devonshire
Graeme Barclay
John and Agatha Lambert

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

‘Buy & Swap’

Listings in ‘Buy & Swap’ are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


A visit to The Eden Project
in Cornwall, England

– Writing in the East London Bromeliad Society Newsletter, January 2013, Billy
Gerretsen shared his impressions of a visit to The Eden Project in Cornwall.
During our annual December
shutdown, my wife Sheila
and I went over to England
to spend time with our children
and grandchildren. We used this
opportunity to head down to Cornwall
to visit The Eden Project and it was
well worth the effort. This facility is
constructed mainly for research and
educational purposes – with the entry
fee from the visitors helping to keep
the project running on a day-to-day
basis as well as contributing to various
ecoprojects around the world.

It is on the site of a disused quarry that
used to supply China Clay. When the
site was nearing the end of its financial
viability some 10 years ago, it was
earmarked as a suitable site for the new
project. It is still being developed - but
then I think gardening and landscaping
is a project seldom ever completed.
(Time spent in our gardens is what
keeps us in a good frame of mind -
most of the time).

What an amazing feat it has turned out
to be, both on the botanical side and on
the engineering side. The main focus
of The Eden Project are two giant
domes or ‘biomes’. Each stands about
55 metres tall and measures some
100 x 200 meters in size. From an
aerial perspective I guess they would
probably look like giant golf balls.

They are constructed from tubular
framework panels, covered and sealed
with layers of plastic sheeting, which
helps with the insulation and internal
climate control of the domes.

One dome is the Tropical Zone and
the other the Mediterranean Zone –
and both are equally impressive as
far as the plant life is concerned.The
Mediterranean Zone felt a little bit like
home, as this is the dome that houses
an area dedicated to the plants typical
to South Africa (Aloes, Succulents,
Proteas, Cape Fynbos, etc.) and for us
perhaps the neatest of the two domes,
as these plants tend to have a specific
structure to them that lends itself well
to landscaping).

The Tropical Dome is dedicated to
the climates of the typical tropical
rain forests with areas depicting the
different plant life of the tropical
forests found throughout the world.
This is also the dome where bromeliads
can be found scattered in amongst the
forest vegetation. We mostly found
different varieties of neoregelias and
guzmanias (all very well tended and
cared for).

I also found a few ‘not so familiar’
bromeliads, one of which, Fascicularia
bicolor or ‘Chilean Fire Wheel’ has
been on my ‘wish list’ for quite some

time now and I managed to arrange
with the garden centre to have one sent
to me.

Visiting The Eden Project during the
English winter was a bit of a trade-
off between having to cope with the
freezing weather versus having to cope
the hordes of other visitors usually
experienced during their summer and
spring, when the exterior gardens
are obviously at their most colourful

best. However, we felt that the winter
gardens were very peaceful and had a
stark beauty all of their own.

A few cups of hot chocolate during the
course of the day more than made up
for having to jostle your way between
masses of visitors! For anyone going to
England, it’s a good day’s outing and
well worth the visit – even for nonplant-
nuts!


Photos from the Bromeliad Society
monthly meeting – February – photos by Peter Coyle


Billbergias were the Monthly Choice competition and we had a fine
selection on show in February.
Aechmea ‘Pickaniny’ Aechmea ‘Kiwi’

Vriesea ‘Dark Knight x ‘Snowman’

Billbergias becoming more popular


– Peter Coyle
For many years I didn’t really take
a lot of notice of this amazing
genus, but more recently I have
been fascinated by the wonderful form,
shape and colours. I have developed
a real liking for the tight vase type
billbergias like ‘Domingos Martins’ and
‘Hallelujah’.

I started to buy a few and then on one of
our trips to Australia visited a couple of
billbergia breeders and purchased one or
two from them. This really got me keen
to see what I could hybridise myself.
I had been hybridising neos, vrieseas,
and alcantareas in a small way from
2008 which had given me a little
knowledge of what to look for when
doing the billbergias, so it was time to
get started.

I have not used any of the imported
plants yet in my hybridising. One of
my main aims is to breed a good garden
plant and also a nice plant to show, so
I guess we will see over the next few
years what happens. In the meantime
I have gone back to hybridising
neoregelia minis – wouldn’t it be nice
if we didn’t have to rely on importing
plants as the risk and cost is so high.

Some of the plants I have used are
‘Domingos Martins’, ‘Hallelujah’,
vittata, fantasia x ‘Afterglow’,’ Bromel-
La’, ‘Simpatico’ and ‘Golden Joy’.
Billbergias like a warm environment
which will bring out the colours and
patterns. I look forward to bringing
some of my plants along to Bromeliad
Society meetings in the future to share

with you.
Group News
Far North Bromeliad Group

– Erin Titmus
Our February Meeting was a special
occasion as we celebrated our tenth
anniversary of the founding of the
group with guests from Whangarei and
South Auckland. Poppy and David were
generous hosts and we thank all those
who contributed to such a wonderful
event.

Hawi and Nancy (from South Auckland
Group) shared updates about the
imminent ’Cool Broms’ conference
in Auckland and encouraged more
members in the Far North to attend what
is sure to be an outstanding event.

Spot Prizes: Congratulations to the
following winners: Elaine/Ian Stewart,
Merle Bishop, Katherine Kozel, Norma
Midgley, Bruce Waldon, Pat West,
Wendy Matthews and Louise McGregor.

Raffle and Auction: Both of these
features were bonanza events today
with an amazing variety of quality
plants on offer. Top bid was for a mature
Alcantarea imperialis (rubra) closely
followed by a Billbergia ‘Domingos
Martins.’

South Auckland Bus Trip: Past
President Rex hosted our guests to
garden visits around Kerikeri. Some of
the committee met with them as they

Cont’d P16 15


Cont’d from P15 – Group News

arrived Saturday lunch time to enjoy
good food and surroundings at Palmco’s
garden of national significance. That
afternoon they visited the gardens of
Howard Plank, Trevor and Shirley Ross,
John and Judy Horrell, Dean and Anne
Kessell and Peter and Pam Scahill.
Before our meeting they stopped in to
see Jim and Wendy Matthews’ Tropicana
and Norma Midgley’s town garden.

Our Next Bus Trip: We plan to come to
Auckland overnight on 6th – 7thApril. The
itinerary includes Russell Fransham’s
nursery, Landsendt Nursery (Oratia) and
another garden nearby, the Auckland
Sale Day and Peter Waters’ garden at
Half Moon Bay, before we head home.

Northland Bromeliad Group

Our first meeting for 2013 was held
on February 24th, a very hot Sunday
at the Subtropical Nursery of Russell
Fransham. Russell’s gardens were
looking amazing considering that
Northland has been without rain for
two months. President Jan opened the
meeting and welcomed 30 members.

Jan reminded us that our next meeting
is our AGM and for members to please
think about making themselves available
for positions. It was decided to take a
minivan to the Bromeliad Sale on April
7th at the Mt Eden Memorial Hall. Two
neoregelias on the competition table

looked very similar – ‘Hot Gossip’ and
‘Milagro’. This lead to a discussion re
parentage with ‘Predator’ coming into
the equation. On checking the Bromeliad
Cultivar Register ‘Hot Gossip’ is listed
as parents unknown, with links to
‘Predator’ and ‘Predatress’. Listing for
‘Milagro’ states: parent (carolinae x
concentrica) x ‘Royal Burgundy’.

A few members had recently purchased
plants that rotted in the centre and it was
put down to over watering? Centre rot?
Wrong position? Anyone’s guess.

‘Show & Tell’: There were some lovely
plants on show and the first prize was
a landslide win to Mac Smith with a
stunning two metre high Guzmania

1st

variegata in flower. Mac Smith

2nd

– Guzmania variegata; Aileen
3rd

Hayward – Tillandsia ‘Creation’;
equal were three neoregelias, Lyn with
‘Lorena’, Pat with ‘Birdrock’ and Sylvia
with ‘Nuance’.

We learned that the Whangarei Quarry
Gardens have been assessed by the New
Zealand Gardens Trust as a ‘Garden of
Significance’. A recent subtropical plant
fair in the gardens was a great success.

To see a video of the gardens go to
https://vimeo.com/59541860

The meeting closed with afternoon tea
and a rush to look at the gardens, the
shade houses and Mac’s collection of
bromeliads. Many purchases were made.

Next Meeting: Our Annual General
Meeting – on Sunday 24th March at
1.30pm at Reyburn House Studio in
the Town Basin, located at the end of
Finlayson Street adjacent to the car
park. Please bring along a small plate
for afternoon tea, a chair, a plant for the
competition and contributions for the
raffle table.

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group
– Jo Elder
Our February Meeting was in the form of
an ‘Open Day’. We were very fortunate
to have excellent publicity in the Bay of
Plenty Times and a small article in the


Weekend Sun. It was a beautiful day, Key, Papamoa. 2. Mr and Mrs Gerald de
with the harbour glistening outside the Villiers, 2 Sovereign Drive Papamoa. 3.
sales and display room and a large cruise Mr and Mrs Shirley and George Cruden,
ship at the wharf across the harbour.
South Auckland Bromeliad Group
64 Sovereign Drive Papamoa.

We had approximately 95 members of
the public come along and 51 of our

members. There was a very attractive
display put together by Gill Keesing,
many members selling their beautiful
plants and Barry Jones gave a display of
‘Removing Pups from Bromeliads’ and
general knowledge on how to pot etc.
This is always a very popular part of our
Open Day.

This Open Day was held in a room to the
side and below the area we usually use,
because the Yacht Club inadvertently
double booked the space. But, we were
very happy with the area, the space was
good and airy, the lighting was excellent
for our plants and we did not get the usual
glare off the water. It was a wonderful
day, and a very big thank you must go
to all the members who contributed so
much to make the occasion the great
success it was.

On 20th February 17 members visited
the lovely gardens of Gill Keesing and
Graeme Alabaster in the Katikati area.
I have been told that the gardens were
presented beautifully and it was sad that
so few members were able to go on the
visit. (me included) The garden owners
go to a lot of work to have their gardens
looking just right.

Next Meeting: April 10th at the Tauranga
Yacht and Power Boat clubrooms,
Sulphur Point, at 12.30pm: The Plant
of the month is purple and dark leaved
neoregelias.

Garden Visits: April 17- At 10.00am.

1. Mr and Mrs Nicholls, 51 Sanctuary
– Marion Morton
In February we were invited to visit
our friends in Kerikeri for a weekend
of celebrations to mark the 10 year
anniversary of the formation of the Far
North Bromeliad Group. Graham West
was made a Life Member of the Far North
Group in recognition of his services and
the promotion of bromeliad interests.
We would like to thank the Far North
Bromeliad Group for giving us such a
lovely memorable weekend. This year
the Whakatane, Thames, Hawkes Bay
and Rotorua groups are also celebrating
ten years since their inauguration.

Our March meeting was held at the
garden of Kevin Kilsby at Mt Albert and
his garden is truly amazing. He bought
the property in 1994 and has done a
fabulous job of landscaping. The garden
is immaculate, beautifully laid out and
vibrant with colour. The garden has a
tropical feel about it and the lawn and
plantings were lush despite the lack of
rain water in the past few months. There
was so much to catch the eye, including
various mosaics plus the birds for which
Kevin is famous, and several members
purchased some of his creations.

We then went along to the garden of
Peter Brady in Mt Eden. Peter’s garden
is well established and covered with all
kinds of interesting plants. The parrot
which he has had for some 7 years was
a great attraction. The garden features
topiary, sculptures, a fish pond and some
very rare plants. Pots have been used

Cont’d P18 17


Cont’d from P17 – Group News

extensively to give height to the garden.
The raffles were won by John Muddiman,
Neil Douglas, and John Yolland.

Next Meeting: 1:30pm on 7th April, at
Win Shorrock’s, 40 McDivitt Street,
Manurewa followed by a visit to the
garden of Dawn and Eric Ashton at 25
Friedlanders Road, Manurewa.

at home! A lovely Aechmea fasciata
‘Kiwi’, originally from Barry Jones in Te
Puke, with its pink and blue flowers was
shown along with Tillandsia harrisii and
mallemontii. Both of these were sporting
gorgeous flowers.

The large selection of sales plants kept
everyone busy and a saunter through

Hawke’s Bay Bromeliad Group
Julie’s collection in the plastic house
followed by afternoon tea and a chat
completed a pleasant afternoon.

– Julie Greenhill
Our first ‘real meeting’ for this year was

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad
held on the last Sunday in February, a
little north of Napier at the home of Julie
Greenhill. The area is looking very dry as
is most of Hawke’s Bay at the moment.
Fortunately Julie has a large tank of rain
water that is kept in reserve especially
for the summer as the bromeliads can’t
take the hard bore water that the rest of
the household uses.

Our Christmas meeting was discussed in
detail as we all enjoyed it so much. Along
with our lovely lunch the success was
due to our guest speaker, Poppy Fuller,
who travelled all the way down from the
far north to see us and also to catch up
with some of her whanau. Poppy gave
us a seemingly effortless talk and plant
arrangement demonstration which was
both interesting and entertaining. We
also loved all the sales plants she brought
with her!

Our group would like to replicate this
format half way through the year and
arrange a mid-year Christmas meeting
with another out of town speaker.

We had a few plants for ‘Show and
Tell’ since there was no competition
this month and members had plants in
flower that were just too good to leave

and Orchid Group – Alison Iremonger

‘Sunshine Capital of NZ’ summed up
the glorious day we had for our February
meeting. Sue Laurent welcomed 30
members to Ross and Gail Fergusson’s
home. Their stunning and well
established large garden overlooking
the harbour always looks a picture. Ross gave us an informative and interesting
demonstration on ‘How to grow
bromeliads from seed’. His large potting
shed displays the success he is having
growing his own plants. As a challenge,
he gave members small plants, from the
same parent plant, to take away and grow
for a year. After that time we will see
the variations in plants, both in colour
and size. Raffles were drawn. Members
purchased plants from the sales table and
afternoon tea was served. Ross and Gail
were on hand to show members around

their garden and answer any questions
they had.

Competition for the best Neoregelia –

1st

Ross Fergusson; 2nd Sandy Lawrie;
3rd Margaret MacDonald.

Next Meeting: 21st April at Trevor and
Pam Signal’s home. Visitors are always
welcome to our meetings. Contacts:
Maureen Moffat 07-322 2276; Ross
Fergusson 07-312 5487; Sue Laurent
07-307 1323.

The Eastern Bay of Plenty Group met at Ross and Gail Fergusson’s place,
overlooking the harbour.


by Graeme Barclay by Graeme Barclay
We look at a classic billbergia that loves the summer sun and looks stunning at this


time of year.

Billbergia ‘Hallelujah’

This plant is widely acknowledged as
Don Beadle’s best billbergia hybrid. The
first serious billbergia hybridist, Don is
affectionately known as ‘Mr. Billbergia’
and he has registered over 100 billbergia
hybrids, stunning plants of all colours
and shapes that are widely spread around
the world. So for Billbergia ‘Hallelujah’
to come out top-of-the-heap, it must
have some exceptional qualities!

The parentage is Billbergia ‘Domingos
Martins’ x Billbergia ‘Ed McWilliams’.
It was made in 1988 and first came into
New Zealand in 1996. It was one of the

PHOTO: JOHN MITCHELL
first hybrids to have the very popular B.
‘Domingos Martins’ – (the unique and
highly marked small form of the speciesB.
vittata) - used as the seed parent. Don was
the first hybridizer to use B. ‘Domingos
Martins’, (named after its location
town of Domingos Martins, in Brazil.

This cross has allowed the white
mottling and blotches to be carried on
to the progeny, and with the size and
red colouring coming through from
the pollen parent B. ‘Ed McWilliams’

-(which is also a select cultivar of the
variable species B. amoena var. amoena)
– we have a sumptuous primary hybrid
as a result. B. ‘Hallelujah’ has since been
used by Don Beadle and others to create
well over 30 other registered hybrids.
Billbergia ‘Hallelujah’ grows to around
50-60cm tall and is attractive and hardy
and easy to grow in New Zealand. It
needs a warm, very sunny position and
no fertiliser once established, in order to
maintain the highly coloured burgundy-
red leaves and tight tubular form. It often
‘glows’ when bright sunlight shines
through it at certain times of the day –
particularly in morning sun – where the
burgundy and white mottled patterning
seems to make the light intensify the
colour through the leaves. It also clumps
very well and makes an outstanding
feature plant in the right garden position,
or large pot. It will often flower more
readily if left to clump up, rather than
being growing as an individual plant.

 

Guzmania squarrosa in Gill Keesing’s garden, Katikati.
June 2013
VOL 53 NO 6
InsIde… a new bromeliad species... neoregelia watersiana
Guzmania squarrosa in Gill Keesing’s garden, Katikati.
June 2013
VOL 53 NO 6
InsIde… a new bromeliad species... neoregelia watersiana

nidulariums:
An undervalued bromeliad genus?


– Notes from Alton Lee’s presentation to the Florida West Coast Society, May 2013.
Alton Lee’s presentation, was an
overview of the pros and cons
of nidulariums and how to care
for them. He showed us examples of
a number of bromeliads in this genus
from his collection and the collections
of Chip Hill and Dave Johnston.
Primary points from his presentation
are as follows: There are about 50
species of nidulariums and they are
primarily from Brazil and especially in
the area around Rio de Janeiro.

Their disadvantages (cons) are:


they are extremely slow-growing,

they are typically not generous
puppers, and

many are unpredictable about when
they bloom.
Their advantages (pros) are:


they are good in the landscape,

they are reasonably hardy,

they have soft leaves and are only
slightly spiny,

they have pretty and long-lasting
blooms,

they are shade-loving and can grow
in deep shade, and

they are slow growing and not
overly productive. (Note: these
were also listed as cons.)
Care of Nidulariums:


they grow well in low and early
morning light,

they like well-drained but moist
soil,

they do not like to dry out between
waterings,

they do well and look their best with
moderate feeding, and

they are not prone to scale and
mealy bugs but can be sprayed for
these if present.
Photo by Alan J. Thomson
Photo by Dave Anderson (taken in our
librarian Noelene Ritson’s Auckland
inner city garden)

Bromeliad society of new Zealand Inc
Bromeliad Journal – June 2013 issue
CONTENTS
Nidulariums: undervalued? – Alton Lee 2
President’s Page – Jocelyn Coyle 4
Bromeliad Society May meeting news – Dave Anderson 5
Bromeliads and evolution – David Benzing 7
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 8
Group News 9
Neoregelia watersiana…new bromeliad species 11
Don Beadle: Mr Billbergia’s deep legacy – Karen Andreas 16
Gill Keesing’s garden in Katikati – Jo Elder 20
My new hot house – Peter Coyle 22
Classic Brom corner – Graeme Barclay 24

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 10 for details of group meeting
times and venues

JUNE JULY
23rd 7th

Hawkes Bay Group meeting South Auckland Group meeting
25th Society monthly meeting at 10th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and 21st Eastern BOP Group meeting
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The 23rd Society monthly meeting at
Monthly Choice competition: Albo-Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden
marginated plants. Speaker: Shane and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
Weston, the president of the Gold Coast The Monthly Choice competition:
Bromeliad Society. Nidulariums. There will be a mid winter

supper and Peter Coyle will speak on

some of his new imported mini and midi

hybrids.

FRONT COVER: This month we go down to Katikati in the Bay of Plenty and
look at Gill Keesing’s attractive garden – article and photos courtesy of Jo Elder. The
cover photo shows a nicely balanced corner of Gill’s garden. The dominant plant in
the photo is Guzmania squarrosa.


PResIdenT’s PAGe

Hello everyone,
What a cold monthly meeting
we had in May. I was really
surprised to see so many of you turn
up – the tough and, as someone said,
the foolish! We weren’t to know that
the heaters had not been installed in the
hall. We have been assured that they
are now up and going so look forward
to warm meetings over the rest of the
winter period.

I guess you have all been busy getting
your plants ready for the winter months
ahead. I have been removing the dead
and damaged leaves from plants and
hosing out any debris and seeds that
may have dropped into them over the
summer. I can’t give you any good
advice on how to prevent hail damage
as it is one of those things that you
just feel so helpless about as you stand
there and watch it coming down and
hope that it won’t last too long.

Once again I enjoyed Hawi Winter’s
presentation about how the heat and
cold does affect our plants, so with his
advice in mind we are going to build
frames over some of our gardens and
put frost cloth over the top so it is not
touching the plants and will allow air
flow underneath. I will let you know
if it works and of course we will be
doing our frost spray – this will be
the fifth year that we have used it and
it is certainly good down to minus 2
degrees.

We thought we would have a bit of fun
at our next meeting in June and have

a Silent Auction. You will be able to
see the plants, and place your bid into
a box for that plant, (no one else will
be able to see your bid) the plant will
go to the highest bidder. If you have
a plant that you would like to put in
the auction please bring it along as the
more plants the more fun. Everyone
can bid and who knows – you may get
a plant for a few dollars! The Society
will take 20% commission.

Shane Weston, the president of the
Gold Coast Bromeliad Society is in
town so I have blackmailed him into
speaking at our June meeting, I said to
him, ‘Shane, no speaking no smoked
marlin pie’ (he sampled one when he
was here for conference). The marlin
courtesy of Larry Murphy. Thanks
Larry.

See you all on Tuesday night June 25th
when all the heat pumps will be going.

Jocelyn

Oct 13 – Spring Sale
NOv 3 – ‘Broms in the Park’
NOv 17 – Society bus trip

from Auckland to Tauranga

Feb 22 & 23, 2014

– ‘Fiesta’ Show and Sale

Bromeliad society May Meeting news


– Notes and photos by Dave Anderson
Jocelyn welcomed about 40
members including one new
member who had braved the very
cold wintry night. With hail during the
day she spoke about looking after your
plants through the months ahead. Two
simple things to do are clean the leaves
and debris out from the leaf axils of the
plants and then place them under trees
or other shelter. Jocelyn uses a spray
called ‘Thermo Max’ that is sprayed
over the bromeliads once a month or
so that strengthens plants against the
cold. A bus trip to Tauranga to visit
5 or 6 gardens in mid November is
being arranged with the final details
to be published in the July or August
Journals. Next month Shane Weston
from Australia will be our guest
speaker followed by a blind auction
of a dozen plants. Finally Jocelyn said
that we are always looking for articles
for the journal so on these winter
nights try and put pen to paper and tell
us about your plants.

Peter Waters took us through the
‘Show and Tell’ plants. The first
plant on show was the true Aechmea
gracilis in flower that had come from
the Marie Selby botanical gardens
in Florida. The blue flowers on the
pendulous spike had not quite opened.
This species belongs to the Ortgiesia
subgenera of Aechmea that is noted
for being easily hybridised hence the
many plants that are wrongly named
as species from crosses that people
have made. Next, for display were
two forms of the species Tillandsia
secunda; the smaller plant being about

70cm diameter that had numerous pups
growing on its 80cm high flower spike.
The other form of it was a much larger
plant with no sign of pups on its flower
spike even though the flower spike
had emerged earlier than the smaller
one. Interestingly, Baensch in his book
states that ‘the typical form can reach
3m in height when in flower’.

Betty Goss won this month’s special
raffle prize. The door prizes went to
Peter Waters, Diane Timmins and
Hazel Foot.

COMPETITIONS


Open Flowering:

First Peter Coyle with Vriesea ‘Astrid’

– a clump of plants with 4 bright red
flower spikes. David Goss was second
with Billbergia ‘Hallelujah – always a
wonderful looking plant. Also in the
competition were Edmundoa lindenii
(variegated); xNeophytum ‘Ralph
Davis’, ‘Gary Hendrix’; Neoregelia
‘Dr Oeser’ (variegated); Guzmania
wittmackii and Vriesea ‘2004’.
Open Foliage:

Peter Coyle was first with a Vriesea
‘Taranaki Mist’ – another one of the
beautiful hybrids from the stable
of Andrew Maloy. Second equal
were Peter Coyle with Neoregelia
‘Groves Red Tiger’ and David Goss
with Aechmea orlandiana. In the
competition were Neoregelia cruenta
x ‘Tickled Pink’, ‘Hot Gossip’ and
Vriesea ‘Red Chestnut’.

Cont’d P6


Alan Cliffe’s Neoregelia‘Tar Baby’ was our
standout overall ‘Plant of the Month’ in
May.


Cont’d from P5 – Bromeliad Society May Meeting News

Tillandsia:

Lester Ching was first with Tillandsia
stricta; a wonderfully mounted huge
clump with a great many flowers.
Second was Noelene Ritson with
Tillandsia ‘Creation’. Other plants
on the table were Tillandsia duratii
var. saxatilis, ixioides, ionantha
(Guatemala), and standleyi.

Neoregelia:

First Alan Cliffe with Neoregelia ‘Tar
Baby’– a beautiful very black plant that
won plant of the month. Second equal
were Peter Coyle with Neoregelia
‘Totara Fire Opal’ and Graeme Barclay
with Neoregelia ‘Gold Lotto’. Also
in the competition were Neoregelia
‘Lamberts Pride’, ‘Mojo’, ‘Royal
Hawaiian’, ‘ Starry Eyed ‘x ‘Big Ones’
and ‘Stargazer’ x ‘Samson’.

Named Monthly Plant (Best red):

First was Chris Paterson with
Alcantarea vinicolor; a species that
is reasonably hardy and always looks
very attractive. Peter Coyle was second
with Billbergia ‘Copacabana’ another
Don Beadle hybrid. In the competition
were Neoregeliaampullacea x ‘Kilauea
Fire’, ‘Tara Furnace’, ‘Dr Oeser’ x
concentrica, ‘Grace Goode’, ‘Velox’,
‘Avalon’ x ‘Fireball’, ‘Exotica’ (red
striated), ‘Sheer Delight’ x ‘Dr Carl’
and Vriesea ‘Twilight’.

The Plant of the Month went to Alan
Cliffe with Neoregelia ‘Tar Baby’.

Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING: Tues 25th June.

Peter Coyle’s Vriesea‘Taranaki Mist’ (an
Andrew Maloy hybrid) – first in the May
Open Foliage competition.


Peter Coyle’s Vriesea‘Astrid’ – first in the
May Open Flowering competition.

Bromeliads and the process
(and myths) of evolution

– Notes on a presentation by Dr David Benzing in Florida West Coast Bromeliad
Society newsletter, March 2013.

Dr. David Benzing’s presentation
was titled How Does Family
Bromeliaceae Demonstrate the
Reality of Darwinian Evolution? He
discussed four common myths about
the process of evolution and showed us
examples of how bromeliads illustrate
the process. He covers this topic in
greater detail in his new book Air Plants:
Epiphytes and Aerial Gardens.

Evolution is necessary for life because it
allows plants and animals to adapt to and
survive changes that occur over time in
their environment (habitat). How these
adaptations are made is more a matter
of error and trial, not trial and error.
Cellular mutations or genetic accidents
(errors) that occur can produce new
traits or characteristics in an organism.
Organisms that develop a new trait that
allows them to deal with subsequent
changes (trials) in growing conditions
within their habitat are better suited to
adapt and survive the changes. Such
adaptations allow organisms to survive
in a niche while others without those
traits cannot.

Bromeliads are almost unmatched among
plants for living in habitats that require
drought tolerance and dependence on
alternative and often scarce supplies of
key nutrients. And this is what makes
them useful for demonstrating plant
adaptations.

The focus of David’s talk was to refute
four common misconceptions about
evolution and he used examples of

bromeliads to make those points, as
follows:

1. It is not true that newer, more complex
species displace older ‘primitive’
species. For example, the photo with this
article shows Vriesea growing beside
a primitive plant form, a lycophyte
(clubmoss). The genus Vriesea is no
more than a few million years old and
the lycophyte in the picture is essentially
the same as its ancestors that lived more
than 300 million years ago.
2. It is not true that characteristics or
adaptations never evolve more than
once. The leafy tanks of bromeliads have
evolved repeatedly throughout their
evolution.
3. It is not true that evolution always
progresses from simple to more
complex forms or structures and
from less to more efficient functions.
Tillandsias have minimised form and
function by developing harder, fewer
leaves, minimising shoots, and being
essentially rootless. These traits give
them an advantage in stressful habitats.
Tillandsias are the most successful in
the family Bromeliaceae in adapting to a
wide range of habitats.
4. It is not true that major changes in form
and function require millions of years.
Evolution does not always proceed in
small steps and in some plants, such as
bromeliads, different aspects of its body
evolve at different rates.

OFFICeRs


Patron: Patricia Sweeney Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
President: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272 Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Vice Presidents: Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451 Committee: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Don Brown 09-361 6175 Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671 David Cowie 09-630 8220
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616 Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt, Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366
Len Trotman, Patricia Sweeney,
Peter Waters

MeMBeRsHIP sUBsCRIPTIOn

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMeLIAd JOURnAL

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Group news

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Jo Elder
We had a very good turnout of members
for our May meeting; Lynley welcomed
everyone and spoke about the Te Puna
Quarry Park and how wonderful it is at
the moment. There are lots of monarch
butterflies.

Jo Elder started a discussion about
‘Protection of plants over the winter’.
We have many climates around the Bay
of Plenty and it was interesting to hear
how the members cope in the colder
areas. Lynley Roy gave a very good talk
on ‘Places not to plant your bromeliads’

i.e. near or under tantalised timber,
copper piping or spouting.
Our plant of the month was bigeneric
plants. Jo explained to the members
what a bigeneric plant is and how
they are made. Plants in the bigeneric
display were; xNeophytum ‘Ralph
Davies’ ‘Firecracker’ ‘Galactic Warrior’
xNeomea ‘Strawberry’ ‘Magenta Star’
and xCanmea ‘Wild Tiger’.

Competition Winners:
Novice section: 1st Billbergia’Hallelujah’


– Diana Fiford, 2nd equal, Aechmea ‘Pink
Rocket’ and Tillandsia lindenii – Doris
Shea, 3rd Neoregelia ‘Noble Descent’ –
Jan Missen.
1st

Open Competition: Neoregelia

Aussie Dream ‘Big Pinkie’ – Isabel
Clotworthy, 2nd equal Aechmea ‘Ensign’

– Jo Elder and Wittrockia superba – Gill
Keesing, 3rd Neoregelia ‘Yin’ – Margaret
Mangos.
1st

Tillandsia: Tillandsia tectorum

(a beautiful clump of small plants)
– Audrey Hewson, 2nd T. ‘Wildfire’ –

Kevin Pritchard, 3rd T. ‘Uncle Pankaj’

– Jo Elder.
‘Show and Tell’: we had a wonderful
selection of plants in this section,
Tillandsia ponderosa, Aechmea correiaaraujoi
Aechmea ‘Red Romance’
Neoregelia ‘Beefsteak’ x ‘Painted
Desert’ ‘Staci’ chlorosticta x ‘Fairy
Paint’(now registered as ‘Night Sky’). A
beautiful pot full of a nidularium which
we think is N. procerum.

Next Meeting: 10th July at the TYPB
clubrooms, Sulphur Point, at 12.30 pm.
The plant of the month: Aechmea. Roger
Allan will speak about horticultural
matters.


Hawkes Bay Bromeliad Group

– Julie Greenhill
Our annual general meeting proved to be
a spirited affair with a long discussion
regarding how we can promote our
profile and attract new members.
The officers elected were:
President: Julie Greenhill; Vice President:
Colin Anderson; Treasurer: Elaine Fern;
Secretary: Sandra Orr; Committee: Wade
Smith and Margaret Bluck; Librarian:
Pieter Franklin; Competitions: Grace
Smith and Margaret Bluck.


The plant competition winners for the
year were announced and prizes given:
Overall most points: Julie Greenhill;
Flowering: Margaret Bluck and Julie
Greenhill;
Non-Flowering: Daniel Franklin;
Tillandsia: Pieter Franklin;
Miniatures: Margaret Bluck


We had a PowerPoint presentation on the


Cont’d P10


Cont’d from P9 - Group News

‘Cool Broms’ conference. Margaret also
had a photo board for all to see.
Wade Smith gave an interesting talk
which sparked discussion on the
intricacies of hybridising.

Next Meeting: Sunday, June 23rd, 2pm at
St John Hall, Taradale. Colin Anderson
will be speaking on companion planting
with bromeliads.


Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad
and Orchid Group

– Ross Fergusson
Sue Laurent welcomed 32 people to
our May meeting and our guest speaker
Nancy Murphy, an internationally
renowned floral artist and judge.

Our September 22nd trip to Tauranga to
visit gardens and nurseries will be in lieu
of a formal September meeting. Please
ring or email Maureen if you wish to
go. Members interested in going to
Auckland for the annual ‘Broms in the
Park’ on November 2nd and 3rd should
also confirm with Maureen please.

Competition

Spotted neoregelias:
1st Ross Fergusson Neoregelia pauciflora
(large form)
2nd Gail Fergusson Neoregelia ‘Predator’


3rd

Pam Signal Neoregelia (an Avon
Ryan hybrid)
Other spotted species:
1st Jackie Israelson Aechmea ‘Ensign’
2nd Pam Signal Billbergia ‘Halleiujah’
3rd Barbara Rodgers Billbergia ‘Othello’

Following our ‘Show and Tell’ we
were wowed by Nancy Murphy’s
demonstration of her floral work. Thanks
Nancy – and also to Margaret Flanagan

who came down to assist her.
The raffles were won by Diana Fox and
Neals Israelson.


Next two meetings: At Matata June 16th
and July 21st.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
We had another good turnout for our


Queen’s Birthday Weekend meeting at
the Auckland Botanic Gardens and it
was a lovely, warm winter’s day. Our
guest speaker was Neil Douglas on the
subject of the removal of vegetative
offsets from mother plants and potting
them up. He also talked about various
growing mediums and fertilisation.
Several members had an opportunity to
remove pups, and good feedback was
received. Some of the ‘skite plants’
brought in were an Aechmea spectabilis
by Margaret Flanagan, an Aechmea
‘Bert’ (variegated) by Roy Morton, and
a Neoregelia ‘Naomi Ceniza’ by Jenny
Gallagher. Marie Healey showed off
her Neoregelia ‘Champagne Romance’
and asked members to bring along their
‘skite plants’ for future meetings.

Members are reminded to please wear
their name tags to meetings. The raffles
were won by Pauline Ashton, May
Morrison, and Marie Healey.

Next Meeting: Special General Meeting
7th July at 1:30pm at the Auckland Botanic
Gardens, 102 Hill Road, Manurewa.
This will be followed by our regular
monthly meeting featuring a panel that
will attempt to answer members’ queries
about all aspects of bromeliad culture. If
you would like a plant identified, come
along and stump the experts.


neoregelia watersiana…
the first bromeliad species to be
named after a new Zealander


In September 2009 Peter and Jeanette
Waters went on an expedition with Elton
Leme to find bromeliad species in Brazil.
Among several new species, a beautiful
new neoregelia was discovered in Rio de
Janeiro state. The description has just
been published in the botanical journal,
‘Phytotaxa’, and is presented here. This has
the special significance of being the first
bromeliad species to be named after a New
Zealander.


Neoregelia watersiana Leme, sp. nov.

This new species is closely related Type: BRAZIL. Rio de Janeiro: Santa
to Neoregelia kautskyi, differing Maria Madalena, Parque Estadual
by the comparatively longer leaf do Desengano, Morumbeca, 1052 m
blades, with longer marginal spines, elevation, 21º 52.60’ S 41º 54.96’ W,
inflorescence with higher number of 15 October 2009, E. Leme 8045, P.
flowers, floral bracts reaching up to the Waters & R. Oliveira (holotype RB!,
middle of the sepals, and by the shorter isotype HB!).
petals, which are white except for the
pale green portion slightly above the Plants epiphytic, propagating by basal
anthers and the purple apical margins shoots. Leaves ca. 12 in number,
and apex. It is also related to N. coriaceous, arcuate to spreadinggavionensis,
but differs by the wider recurved at anthesis, forming at the base
leaf blades, with laxly to subdensely a crateriform rosette; sheaths broadly
spinose margins, and flowers with elliptic to suborbicular, subdensely
comparatively shorter pedicels. When whitish lepidote on both sides, green
compared to N. coriacea it differs toward the apex and whitish near the
by the narrower leaf blades, sepals base, subcoriaceous, elliptic, 10–11
shortly connate at the base, and by × 8–9 cm; blades sublinear, slightly
petals shortly connate at the base, narrowed near the base, 19–30 × 4–4.7
white except for the pale green portion cm, inconspicuously and sparsely
slightly above the anthers and the white lepidote abaxially, glabrous
purple apical margins and apex. adaxially, green to dark red toward the

Cont’d P13 11


Neoregelia watersiana (Leme et al. 8045). A. Epiphytic habit of N. watersiana (red leafed
plants) at the type locality, about 20 m above the ground, in the forest canopy. B. Habit of
type specimen growing under less intensive light exposure. C. Details of the inflorescence
and flowers. D. Habit of a juvenile specimen growing under intense sunlight.


Cont’d from P11 – Neoregelia watersiana

apex, subacute to obtuse and distinctly
apiculate, margins laxly to subdensely
spinose, spines 1.5–3 × 1 mm, narrowly
triangular, strongly antrorse-uncinate,
5–15 mm apart. Peduncle ca. 2 cm long,
ca. 1.1 cm in diameter, glabrous, white;
peduncle bracts broadly ovate, acute
and distinctly apiculate, spinulose at
the apex, sparsely and inconspicuously
white lepidote, nerved, whitish,
the upper ones involucral, 2.5–3.5
× 2–2.5 cm, acute and slenderly
apiculate, slightly exceeding the
ovary. Inflorescence globose-capitate,
simple, subcorymbose, sunk in the
center of the rosette, ca. 4.3 cm long
(excluding the petals), 5.5–6 cm in
diameter at the apex, densely flowered,
apex nearly flat; floral bracts the outer
ones resembling the involucral bracts
but narrower, the inner ones sublinearlanceolate
to linear, cymbiform,
ecarinate, apex acute, cucullate and
shortly apiculate, entire, sparsely and
inconspicuously white lepidote to
glabrous, thin in texture, nerved, green
except for the vinose apex, 27–33 ×
5–10 mm, up to equaling the middle of
the sepals. Flowers ca. 80 in number,
45–46 mm long (with extended petals),
slightly fragrant, pedicels 6–8 × 1.5 mm
(inner ones) to ca. 15 × 2 mm (outer
ones), subterete (inner ones) to slightly
complanate but not at all dilated
toward the base (outer ones), white,
sparsely and inconspicuously lepidote;
sepals narrowly lanceolate, acuminate
and slenderly caudate, asymmetric
with the inconspicuous wing distinctly
shorter than the midnerve, ca. 19 ×
6 mm, connate at the base for 1.5–2
mm, entire, ecarinate, green toward
the apex and reddish at the base, thin
in texture, glabrous; petals lanceolate,

acuminate, ca. 26 × 5 mm, connate
at the base for ca. 7 mm, spreading
at anthesis, white except for the pale
green portion slightly above the anthers
and the purple apical margins and
apex, bearing 2 longitudinal callosities
nearly equaling the anthers; filaments,
the antepetalous ones adnate to the
petals for ca. 9 mm, the antesepalous
ones adnate to the petal tube and
free above it; anthers ovate, ca. 2.5
mm long, fixed at 1/4 of their length
above the base, base obtusely bilobed,
apex acute; stigma conduplicatespiral,
subcylindrical, white, ca. 5 mm
long; ovary oblong-ellipsoid, ca. 10
× 5 mm, terete, white except for the
green apex, glabrous; epigynous tube
inconspicuous; ovules many, obtuse;
placentation apical. Fruits unknown.

Distribution and habitat: Neoregelia
watersiana is a dweller of the canopy
of the hygrophilous Atlantic Forest of
the county of Santa Maria Madalena,
northern Rio de Janeiro state. It forms
dense clumps on the taller trees, about
1056 m elevation, in a mountainous
region inside the limits of the State
Parque of Desengano, which is known
for the rich bromeliad flora with many
endemic species.

Etymology:The name of N. watersiana
honours one of its collectors, Peter
Waters from New Zealand, bromeliad
specialist, New Zealand director and
Honorary Trustee of the Bromeliad
Society International.

Observations: This new species is
closely related to N. kautskyi Pereira
(1971: 82) but can be distinguished
from it by the comparatively longer


The Desengano State Park in the northern Rio de Janeiro
state… home to the species Neoregelia watersiana.


Up in the clouds on the summitof Mt Morumbeca


Capturing the ‘prize’

4WD work!

14


leaf blades (19–30 cm vs. 8–18 cm
long), with longer marginal spines
(1.5–3 mm vs. ca. 0.5 mm long),
inflorescence with more numerous
flowers (ca. 80 vs. 30–45 in number),
floral bracts reaching up to the middle
of the sepals (vs. equaling to slightly
exceeding the ovaries), and by the
shorter petals (ca. 26 mm vs. ca. 35
mm long), which are white except for
the pale green portion slightly above
the anthers and the purple apical
margins and apex (vs. white except for
the violet apex).

When compared to N. gavionensis
Martinelli & Leme (1986: 71), this
new species differs by the wider leaf

blades (4–4.7 cm vs. ca. 3 cm wide),
with laxly to subdensely spinose
margins (vs. entire), and flowers with
comparatively shorter pedicels (6–15
mm vs. 10–20 mm long).

Neoregelia watersiana is also related
in some degree to N. coriacea
(Antoine 1884: 51) Smith (1955: 27),
differing by the narrower leaf blades
(4–4.7 cm vs. ca. 6 cm wide), sepals
shortly connate at the base (vs. high-
connate), and by petals shortly connate
at the base (vs. high-connate) and
white except for the pale green portion
slightly above the anthers and the
purple apical margins and apex (vs.
violet with white margins).


The desengano state Park in the county of santa
Maria Madalena, northern Rio de Janeiro state…
home to the species neoregelia watersiana

The park covers an area of 22,400 hectares (224 square miles) and is
characterised by sharp ridge tops, sugar loaves, hills, culverts and slopes
up to 75 degrees of tilt with staggered heights. Desengano Peak, at 1761
metres, Pico St. Matthew, 1576 metres, and the Stone Needle, 1080 metres.

They are valuable
and attractive for
their natural scenery
and numerous rivers
and waterfalls. Many
watercourses are
responsible for the
supply of water to
the main villages in
the municipalities of
St. Maria Madalena
and Sao Fidelis.
Temperatures range
between 6° and 35°C.


don Beadle:
Mr. Billbergia’s deep Legacy


– By Karen Andreas (Original source unclear – reprinted from
‘The Bromeliad Blade’ June 2013, published by San Diego Bromeliad Society)
In the beginning, Billbergia was
a modest little plant, often plain
green with three leaves, a few spots
and a quick-lived inflorescence. It was
relegated to the back of collections,
neglected and disrespected. Then
Billbergia met Don Beadle and neither
was ever the same again.

Born in Lafayette, Louisiana, Don
Beadle never quite fit in. “I couldn’t
play the banjo and I couldn’t talk
Cajun,” he says, so he booked out of
Louisiana at age 19, joining the Air
Force. College. Four years of military
service followed and Don Beadle was
now a petroleum engineer. He started
with Philips Petroleum and worked his
way into smaller and smaller companies
until he had his own, Macero Minerals,
in Corpus Christi, Texas. In Corpus
Christi John Anderson and Don
were neighbours, sharing coffee and
cigarettes every morning before work.
Thus began a lifelong friendship that,
in later years, made them a popular
duo of auctioneers, sought after as
much for their stories and banter as
their auctioneering skills.

It was during those early days that
Don discovered bromeliads. He went
to a bromeliad society meeting, and
the addiction was immediate. His first
bromeliad was Aechmea ‘Black Jack’.
‘You just can’t kill this plant’, Don
says with great fondness. John became

a renowned grower of aechmeas. ‘John
never did anything half-assed’, Don
remembers.

Don was fascinated by the variety and
wanted to collect every bromeliad in
the world. The impracticality of it soon
became apparent, and so he narrowed
his focus on to the lowly and lonely
Billbergia. ‘I collected all the species
I could find – there were about 20
available at the time’, he says.

He looked for cultivars although they
were few and far between. ‘Mulford
Foster had made ‘Fantasia’ and R.
Wilson had made ‘Catherine Wilson’
but, in general, billbergias had not
really caught on in popularity.’ Don
was fascinated by the idea of making
hybrids and found the process
exhilarating. Preserving pollen was
the first big challenge. After only two
or so days, it would turn green and
lose viability. Once he figured out that
freezing the pollen kept it viable for up
to two years, it became ‘compulsive,
an addiction’, he remembers.

Still, he was growing green billbergias.
It was a limiting process, until Bob
Whitman found ‘Domingos Martins’,
the gorgeously spoiled cultivar of
vittata. ‘I lusted after that bromeliad
with a passion’, Don says. Afer
much coercion and a year’s wait,
Don got a pup and went to work. He


crossed ‘Domingos Martins’ with
‘Ed McWilliams’, and Billbergia
‘Hallelujah’ was born. Prized for its
rich deep red leaves and its white
and pink spots, its foliage appeal
long outlasts its stunning magenta
scapes and purple flowers. ‘Domingos
Martins’ revolutionised hybridising
and today is found in many Billbergia
cultivars.

Don continued to create better, more
beautiful, sexier billbergias to the
extent that they soon moved to the
forefront of sales and shows. Everyone
wanted a ‘Don Beadle Billbergia.’

Billbergias were no longer the red
headed stepchild of the bromeliad
world. ‘Afterglow’ with its rich, deep
pink blush does literally glow as light
shines through its leaves. ‘La Noche’s’
dark, banded leaves are dramatic
and stunning. ‘El Capitan’ is another
dramatic billbergia whose sturdy
leaves have both banding and spots.
Don quickly ran out of plant growing
space and built his first greenhouse.
More hybridising soon followed, as did
a larger house and a larger greenhouse,
where he lived and grew bromeliads
for ten years. He came to Florida to
visit Harry Luther and Wally Berg,
who, as it turned out, were off in South
America on a collecting expedition.
Through happenstance, he ended up at
a realtor’s and told the agent he wanted
a ‘house on the beach with room for
some greenhouses.’ The agent later
called him with news of a place with a
fresh water pond and three greenhouses
full of dead plants; Don made the deal
over the phone. So in 1986, Don sold
his Corpus Christi house and moved to

First Dirt Road in Venice, home to Los
Milagros nursery. He fell in love with
the place, rebuilding the greenhouses
and growing like mad. To date, he has
created more than 140 named cultivars
and many more yet to be named.

While he continued to hybridise,
Don was breaking ground in yet
another area: photography. He set up a
dedicated space for taking pictures and
decided it would be more dramatic and
compelling to photograph bromeliads
in clumps rather than singly, then
the norm. Every day he checked for
blooms so he could catch the flowers
at their (quick) peak. He experimented
with lighting, finally settling on blue
photo bulbs for the most honest light.
Using a Nikon camera with a full array
of lenses, he honed his photographic
skills and incorporated double
exposures into his photographic
repertoire. When Don decided to create
a photographic record of species, Harry
Luther suggested that Don dissect
the flower and capture its qualities in
intimate detail. In those pictures, Don
started using ‘that little white ruler that
I love. I got unadulterated pleasure
from the photography. It gave me a lot
of satisfaction.’

Don’s presentations at World
Conferences became standing room-
only events, as those who attended
the recent one in Orlando can attest.
Audiences sat in rapt silence as Don’s
slides were shown, with minimal but
very often pithy commentary from
Don and to the accompaniment of quiet
music. His photographs set the standard
for both scientific presentation and
artistry. His technique and the quality

Cont’d P18 17


Cont’d from P17– Don Beadle: Mr. Billbergia’s Deep Legacy

of his legacy are evident today. The
next time you see a beautiful picture of
a bromeliad, you will catch the echoes
of Don’s influence.

The legacy does not end there, however.
In 1998, Don Beadle compiled the last
published Bromeliad Cultivar Registry
for the BSI. This monumental work was
the bromeliad bible of nomenclature
and bloodlines of every known cultivar
at the time. Don compiled this tome on
a computer – it is hard to imagine now
how revolutionary this technology was
at the time – yet he understood that it
was obsolete in many ways as soon as
it was published. Beyond having taken
on this labour- and time-intensive task
for the bromeliad world, he recognised
that changes, new information and
new cultivars would overtake the
publication within a very short time.
He also believed that the internet
would be a way to offer accessible
information.

To that end, Don first suggested to the
BSI those digital files be made available
on compact disk but he was ahead of
his time with technology. That was an
impractical suggestion as most people
at that time did not have access to the
kinds of programs that would handle
such a document. So Don offered the
files to Florida Council of Bromeliad
Societies webmaster Michael Andreas.
Michael was able to create the format
for the internet and make the living,
flexible Cultivar Registry available
for world access. Don’s work at
organising, educating and providing
information about bromeliad cultivars
lives on.

In 2000, Don’s life took another turn,
and he sold Los Milagros, the nursery
and the property, to Michael Kiehl
who moved his nursery, Michael’s
Bromeliads, to First Dirt Road. Don now
had time to indulge in other passions

— tennis, his boat and Joann Buell, his
lovely companion of so many years.
‘She makes all things so worthwhile’,
Don says of Joann with that twinkle
in his eye. Today, Don can often be
found at Micheal’s Bromeliads. Don
has reorganised the Beadle billbergia
collection that lives and thrives there,
sharing information and memories
with Michael Kiehl. Don’s amazing
collection of photographs now lives
on the website of the Florida Council
of Bromeliad Societies (fcbs.org) in
yet another collaboration with Michael
Andreas.
Don’s passion for bromeliads led to
groundbreaking billbergia cultivars
that made this genus one of the most
popular; his groundbreaking bromeliad
photography set the standard for
bromeliad pictures; his passion for
knowledge led to the Bromeliad
Cultivar Registry; his vision for
an accurate registry accessible and
available to one and all took him
beyond his peers and now serves the
entire world. Don Beadle’s legacy has
had a deep impact on our bromeliad
world.

The Don Beadle Collection

More than 1000 photographs,
drawings, art and notes, are now
posted online at fcbs.org, the website
of the Florida Council of Bromeliad
Societies.


A few don Beadle billbergia hybrids…

– Plants and photos supplied by Peter Waters
Billbergia ‘Caramba’


Billbergia ‘Connie Timm’


Billbergia ‘Despacio’ Billbergia ‘Risque’


Gill Keesing’s garden in Katikati…

20


Gill Keesing’s garden in Katikati


– Article and photos by Jo Elder
Gill’s love of bromeliads began
over twenty years ago after she
went to a Bromeliad Society
show at Eden Gardens. She joined
the society and attended the Auckland
meetings. Gill began growing and
selling plants and entering in all the
shows, (with success) and of course
adding to her collection.

Gill and husband Don retired to
Katikati eight years ago and Gill joined
the Tauranga based Bay of Plenty
Bromeliad Group where she is now a
valued member of the committee.

Their garden is small, only a 550sq
metre section, but she manages to fit
a great variety of plants into it. The
garden does get frosts, quite heavy
ones at times, so she moves many
broms under the shelter of trees. Those
plants too large to move such as two
alcantareas that are just starting to
come into bloom are covered with
frost cloth clipped onto garden stakes
with clothes pegs. Don has built a
small plastic house where Gill grows
bromeliad pups.

Besides all the old favourites Gill has
lots of new plants, especially vrieseas
that she loves. Nidulariums are also
favoured because they look good for a
long time.

A large palm tree was cut down last
year to about a 1.5 metre stump where
various neoregelias and vrieseas have
been attached and they are all growing

well. On top is a large pot of Neoregelia
zonata which looks stunning with
the sun shining through the leaves. A
lot of the vrieseas have flowered this
year, probably because of the long hot
summer we have had, also a Guzmania
squarrosa has flowered, a beautiful
plant when in bloom.

Gill loves visiting other people’s
gardens and cannot resist buying new
plants!! She thoroughly enjoyed the
‘Cool Broms’ conference held earlier
this year in Auckland and feels that it
was a credit to all those who worked
so hard to make it such a success. She
hopes to enjoy her bromeliads for
many years to come.

My new hot house

– Article and photos by Peter Coyle
I had been thinking about a new hot
house for my billbergias for about
a year as they had suffered a lot of
cold damage the previous year when
temperatures were down to –1ºC in
our big glasshouse. I had a good look
around at kitsets that were available
and came to the conclusion they were
not quite what I was looking for.

I gave a good friend of mine a call and
discussed whether he would design a
6m x 4m house for me, then I hit him
with, ‘After the design, how long do
you think it would take you to build
it mate?’ Silence, then, ‘Are you for
real Coyle?’ Of course the answer was
‘Yes’ and then we struck a deal.

Boy, was I happy that Geoff would
build this for me as he is an absolute


Oct 13

Spring Sale

NOv 3

‘Broms in the Park’

NOv 17

Society bus trip
from Auckland to Tauranga


Feb 22 & 23, 2014

‘Fiesta’ Show and Sale

perfectionist and I just knew it would
be great. Now that the hot house is
up and running we will monitor its
performance over the winter and then
summer months. Gone (I hope) are the
days when my plants suffer from cold
damage.

Some of the specs are:


6mtr x 4mtr x 3mtr to the top of the
curved roof

Frame rectangle shaped galvanized
steel

Cladding polycarbonate twin wall
8mm with 20% UV

Sits on existing concrete floor.

Watering system has 6 separate
functions with filter, can be auto or
manual, each bench can be watered
separately.

9 steel rods will take up to 400
hanging baskets

Very small heater to keep
temperature up during winter months
which has proved to be invaluable.
Hold temperature at about 7ºC
above the outside temperature during
the night. ( 30% – 40% humidity at
all times)

In the summer we will be looking at
fans to help with air circulation.
So now my billbergias are happy and
I have also got a few other genera like
Cryptanthus and Aechmea out of the
cold.

And the house is full already!


Peter Coyle’s hot house…


By Graeme Barclay By Graeme Barclay
This month we look at three popular variegated neoregelias that have an
interesting background, but are often misnamed as other similar looking plants.

Neo. ‘Predator’, Neo. ‘Predatress’ and Neo. ‘Hot Gossip’

The story starts back in the mid-
late 1980s when Chester Skotak
in Costa Rica made a number
of complex hybrid crosses involving
the species carolinae (variegated)
combined with a number of other
species and hybrids. These grexes
produced many seedlings, with some
noteworthy albomarginated specimens
being imported into Australia by Peter
Tristram in the early 1990s. Some of
these were pups off a plant with the
very complex formula of [((carolinae
x ‘Painted Lady’) x ‘Takemura
Princeps’)) x carolinae)] x ‘Dark
Spot’. These imports were unique and
they were quickly snapped up by eager
collectors in Australia.

Peter eventually named and registered
his plant as ‘Predator’ in 1998, but
unbeknown to him, around the same
time it was also being registered as ‘Hot
Gossip’ by another grower. This has
unfortunately led to the same plant been
circulated under two different names.
When the original ‘Predator’ had pups,

GRAEME BARCLAY
it produced a centrally variegated ‘sport’

– which remained a true variegate and
was subsequently named and registered
as ‘Predatress’.
There is often confusion identifying
‘Predator/Hot Gossip’against the similar
looking Skotak plants – ‘Milagro’ and
‘Garnish’. There is some discussion
that they are all from the same grex and
too similar to tell apart, but this is not
true. Neo. ‘Predator/Predatress’ is faster
growing, smaller at only around 40cm
max diameter, has narrower leaves,
and the leaves are also slightly thinner
and less ‘leathery’ to the touch than
‘Milagro’ and ‘Garnish’. They also have
a more upright growth habit and don’t
flatten out quite as much at flowering.

So, how do you tell ‘Milagro’ and
‘Garnish’ apart? That will have to
be another story for another ‘Classic
Broms Corner’!

These plants are all quite hardy and best

grown in high light, or morning sun
locations to intensify
the red-on-white
colourings. Feed in
spring when young
to achieve a healthy
size and plant them
in groups if possible,
where they make a
great contrast with
larger green foliage
plants.

Neo. ‘Predator’ Neo. ‘Predatress’

24

 

Aechmea ‘Blue Rain’ on the Heroic gardens trail 2013.
Photo: Alan J. Thomson
April 2013VOL 53 NO 4
• 2013 Heroic gardens
• ‘Cool Broms’ conference colour and show results
Aechmea ‘Blue Rain’ on the Heroic gardens trail 2013.
Photo: Alan J. Thomson
April 2013VOL 53 NO 4
• 2013 Heroic gardens
• ‘Cool Broms’ conference colour and show results

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc
Bromeliad Journal – April 2013 issue
CONTENTS
President’s Page – Jocelyn Coyle 3
Bromeliad Society March meeting news – Dave Anderson 4
‘Cool Broms’ conference reflections – Peter Waters 6
2013 Annual Show trophy and class winners 9
‘Cool Broms’ photos… people, plants, displays 12
Focus on Aechmea fasciata – Lyn Wegner 14
Buy & Swap 16
Heroic gardens trail, 2013 – Alan J. Thomson 17
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 20
Group News 21
Classic Brom corner – Graeme Barclay 24

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 21 for details of group meeting
times and venues.

APRIL MAY

5th

23rd Society monthly meeting at South Auckland Group meeting.
8th

Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and Bay of Plenty Group meeting.
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The 15th Bay of Plenty Group garden visits.
Monthly Choice competition: Best white 28th Society monthly meeting at
plants. Alan Cliffe will talk on bugs and Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and
sprays. Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The
28th Northland Group meeting. Monthly Choice competition: Best red
28th Hawkes Bay Group meeting and plants.
AGM.


JUNE

16th Eastern Bay of Plenty Group

meeting.

FRONT COVER: Aechmea ‘Blue Rain’ in Kelvin Kilsby’s garden was part of the
recent Auckland Heroic gardens trail. Alan Thomson took some great photos and
gave us his impressions. See page 17.


PRESIDENT’S PAGE

Hello everyone. Wow… if you
attended the ‘Cool Broms’
conference, what did you think?

We have had simply amazing feedback
from the Aussies, South Africans and
Americans and of course the locals,
telling us what a great time they had…
really interesting lectures… great
speakers… wonderful gardens and
enjoyable kiwi hospitality. I know a
lot of our visitors extended their time
here travelling around our magnificent
country.

A big ‘thank you’ to everyone who
helped put ‘Cool Broms’ together and
also to all those who just by being there
made it a happy place . The show plants
were outstanding with a large number
of plants being entered. Once again the
‘Champion of the Show’ trophy went
out of Auckland, this time to Brian
and Natalie Simmonds of Tauranga.
Congratulations!

All those who attended can now look
forward to receiving their DVD of the
conference lectures. You will be able to
experience them all over again.

A special request from one of our
members who was speaking to someone
at conference who said they had a photo
of Harry Luther and Margaret Draddy. If
possible, she would like a copy so that
she can send it on to Margaret Please let
me know if you know who this person is.

I hope you have all had some rain over
the last few weeks. The garden is slowly
starting to look a better place and it may
have just come in time for some of the
plants as they were really starting to
suffer. Now it’s a matter of waiting to see
what winter throws at us.

‘Broms in the Park’ will be held again
on Sunday 3rd November and everyone
is welcome.

Our April monthly meeting will double
as our AGM. Please don’t go, ‘Oh no’.
It never takes up too much time and
then we will have Alan Cliffe talk to us
on Bugs and Sprays. And this time the
computers will compute.

See you on the 23rd.

Jocelyn

A special thank you…
We would like to thank all the members of the Society who have shown us their support
and sympathy, after thieves hit our property three times in quick succession, stealing the
bulk of our bromeliad collection.

While we still feel extremely sad and angry that there are people around who would do
such a thing, the blow has definitely been softened by the amazing amount of support we
have received from both local members and international visitors, who seemed to find
out about our predicament during the ‘Cool Broms’ conference.

We would also like to thank the extreme generosity of Peter and Jocelyn Coyle, Andrew
and Rhonda Maloy, and Michelle Tohi for the great kick start they have provided to our
‘new’ bromeliad collection.

Dennis and Laura Weber

Bromeliad Society
March Meeting News – Dave Anderson

After welcoming everyone,
president Jocelyn spoke about
the wonderful ‘Cool Broms’
conference in March. The feedback
from the overseas attendees had been
excellent not to mention the accolades
from the kiwis who were there. Other
members in the audience who attended
also thanked the committee for making
the conference so successful along with
the speakers and auctioneers who made
them feel very proud. Jocelyn also
gave a special thanks to Nancy Murphy
and husband Larry for putting up the
magnificent displays.

Jocelyn then spoke about the annual
competition trophy winners that had
been presented at the banquet on the
Sunday of the conference.

The monthly meeting started with the
‘Show and Tell’. The only plant on the
table was a Neoregelia ‘Africa’ F2. This
one had not been brought in last month
when members had them on display. It
was a very deep red colour with heavy
thorns.

Jocelyn asked if there was any problem
involved using water from a roof that had
copper spouting for watering bromeliads.
There was a variance of opinion that
revolved around the ph or acidity of the
rainwater with no definitive answer.

The draw for the special raffle prizes
were first Jenny Green and second Alan
Cliffe. The door prizes went to Robert
Flanagan, Isobel Dryburgh and John
Dryburgh.

Unfortunately we had computer

problems and were not able to proceed
with the PowerPoint presentation on
insecticides.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First was John
Muddiman with a Guzmania hybrid

– a clump that had 6 flowers in full
bloom. Second was Chris Paterson with
Wittrockia cyathiformis - a very attractive
species in flower. In the competition
were Acanthostachys pitcairnioides;
Aechmea chantinii; Guzmania
sanguinea; Tillandsia multicaulis,
confertiflora; Vriesea philippo-coburgii,
‘Dark Knight’ x ‘Snowman’, ‘Tiger Tim’
and Nidularium innocentii.
Open Foliage: First was John Mitchell
with Vriesea ‘Kiwi Delight’ F2 x
‘Midnight Splendor’ – a plant with
beautiful red colouration in the leaves.
Second was Peter Coyle with Aechmea
‘Bert’ (variegated). In the competition
were Aechmea ‘Brillig’; Billbergia
‘Domingos Martins’ x vittata; Quesnelia
‘Tim Plowman’, Nidularium atalaiaense;
Vriesea ‘Golden Legend’ and ‘Raspberry
Crush’ x ‘Vista’.
Tillandsia: Peter Coyle’s Tillandsia
stricta was first and second was Lester
Ching with Tillandsia harrisii. On
the table were Tillandsia ‘Creation’,
fasciculata, gymnobotrya, mallemontii,
punctulata, secunda and streptophylla.
Neoregelia: First was Peter Coyle with
Neoregelia ‘Cooloola Romance’ – a
most attractively plant made by Margaret
Paterson. Michelle Tohi was second with
Neoregelia (smithii x ‘Royal Flush’) x
‘Blushing Tiger’. In the competition were
Neoregelia kautskyi, ‘Groucho’, ‘Best of
Both’, ‘Painted Delight’, ‘Rio Grande’,
Ryan hybrid, ‘Tara Mite’ ‘Hot Gossip’,

‘Tickled Pink’ x ‘Star Gazer’, ‘Tigrina’ x
‘Gold Fever’ and ‘Shelldance’.

Monthly Choice – (Aechmea fasciata
and hybrids): First was John Mitchell
with Aechmea ‘Primera’ - cv of fasciata

– always an attractive species with its
spineless leaves, John Muddiman was
second with Aechmea fasciata. Also
in the competition were two clumps of
Aechmea fasciata.
The Plant of the Month went to John
Mitchell with Vriesea ‘Kiwi Delight’ F2
x ‘Midnight Splendor’.
Congratulations to all the winners.


Plant spotting

Peter Coyle gave a plant commentary on
some of the above plants:
Aechmea flavorosea – a species with pale
green banded leaves and a lovely red/
orange flower. Some people said they
had trouble getting more than one pup
off this plant. Peter said that if you took
the first pup off when it had reached a
reasonable size, then repotted the mother
with a dose of good fertiliser in the mix,
the mother would then produce several
more pups.
Vriesea ‘Tiger Tim’ – a sport from the
species Vriesea ospinae var gruberi
that develops very white banding in the
leaves. Peter said that it was best to feed
this plant heavily to promote the white
banding.
Tillandsia multicaulis – a four plant
clump with each of the plants having
several flower spikes. A very easy to
grow garden plant in Auckland with its
green leaves and stunning flower spikes.
Acanthostachys pitcairnioides – an
unusual species with the small blue
flowers deep inside the rosette.
Aechmea chantinii – a plant always
much admired with its silver and green
cross banding. However in Auckland it
requires warmth and protection through

our cool winter months.
Vriesea ‘Golden Legend’ – one of the
many varieties of the species Vriesea
fosteriana that came to NZ as a pup from
Allan Ladd’s nursery in Australia in the
mid 1980’s. As the name suggests it has
lovely golden banding through the leaves
when grown in high light.

Tillandsia secunda – a plant noted for
being viviparous in that its pups appear
up its flower spike.
Neoregelia ‘Shelldance’ – a cv. of ‘Fairy
Paint’ that is a small/medium sized plant
with lovely wavy red marginated leaves.
At the conference in Cairns some years
ago the owner of one of these plants
rolled each leaf up and held them in
place with clothes pegs for many days.
The result was quite stunning however
you would have to have a lot of patience
to reproduce this effect.

NEXT MEETING: AGM and General
Meeting Tuesday 23rd April.


‘Cool Broms’ Conference, March 2013

Reflections from our Conference Convenor – Peter Waters

After nearly four years of
preparation, it was great to see
the displays being assembled on
the Thursday and they were well worth
waiting for. They were all stunning and
the attention to detail, particularly in
the two large ones designed by Nancy
Murphy, was a testament to her floral
art skills. The plants in the New Zealand
hybrids display were outstanding and
gained much attention over the weekend
and several other smaller displays by the
Bay of Plenty and Thames groups, as
well as an individual bromeliad on puriri
logs exhibit by Jeanette Waters were
much commented on.

In conjunction with the Conference, the
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand held
its annual competitive show and this
once again produced a great selection
of quality exhibits, which were judged
by a panel of four Australian and two
American judges. The prizes were
awarded at the banquet later in the
weekend.

The serious part…

Saturday morning was off to a good
start with the Conference Breakfast and
then began the serious business with the
bromeliad seminars, featuring a slate
of international and domestic speakers.
One of the great features of the Waipuna
Hotel is the auditorium, providing the
best venue for the seminars of any
of the bromeliad conferences, and
the speakers didn’t disappoint. José

Manzanares was a huge hit, his first
lecture about the upcoming changes in
the tillandsias because of DNA analysis
was interesting, informative and as easy
to understand as was possible with this
subject. Dennis Cathcart was a great
replacement for Harry Luther and was
able to give much the same talk about the
Singapore Gardens. Michael Kiehl gave
interesting talks about his bromeliad
nursery and his connection with Don
Beadle and his billbergias. From closer
to home we heard Nigel Thomson
on colour in bromeliads, with a very
entertaining discourse, Andrew Maloy
on his expert subject, vrieseas, and
Hawi Winter with a very interesting talk
on aspects of bromeliad culture. A big
disappointment was the late withdrawal
of keynote speaker, Elton Leme, due
to urgent commitments in his justice
profession and much to his regret. This
was tempered however by the excellent
videos he had prepared professionally
to deliver three seminars. A surprise for
the attendees was the performance by a
Kapahaka group from Otahuhu College
who thrilled for a quarter-hour opening
session with several action songs and
haka.

Lots of plants and lots of dollars…

The raffle with the prize of ten winners
getting into the Plant Sales area fifteen
minutes before everyone else was a huge
success with many hundreds of tickets
sold. The rest need not have worried
because there were plenty of plants left,
particularly vrieseas, where the Maloy’s
had brought in huge numbers with a
preponderance of white-centred and
pink specimens. Even though the sales
area was only open for a total of three
and a half hours there was over $32,000
of plants sold. This total was increased
by sales of vrieseas on the garden tour to
the Maloy’s on Saturday afternoon.

In a break from tradition there were
two garden tours, Saturday afternoon to
Totara Waters and the Maloy’s nursery
and the next afternoon to the Waters’,
Ching’s and Flanagan’s gardens.
Unfortunately the rain was somewhat of
a nuisance for the second day, but badly
needed.

The Auction was one of the successes of
the Conference, all 45 lots being keenly
contested with the largest bid going
to a magnificent Maloy hybrid, which
fetched $1,600. The strategy of having
two auctioneers, Peter Coyle with his
low-key approach and Doug Cross with
a quick-fire method produced $14,465 to
help with the expenses.

A traditional New Zealand
welcome…


A great social atmosphere…

Two optional dinners were laid on, one at
Waipuna Hotel and the other downtown
in the Sky Tower. They were both well
patronised and helped to create the social
atmosphere that makes for a memorable
Conference. A feature of the Waipuna
Hotel is the excellent catering and
morning teas and lunch each day were
of a high standard, as was the banquet
on Sunday night. During courses the
trophies were presented to the prize
winners in the competitive show and a
presentation made to the judges.

At the closing session on Monday
afternoon, a presentation was made to
the speakers, and also the Conference
committee followed by a few words
about the next Australian Conference in
Sydney, two years hence.

From the many comments received since
the Conference it seems that everyone
thoroughly enjoyed the ‘Cool Broms’
experience and had a great time.

‘Cool Broms’ conference photos by
Andrew Devonshire and Murray Mathieson


Great Waipuna lunches!

Visit our website to view ‘Cool Broms’ photos…

Shortly we will have a selection of photos from the March 2013 ‘Cool Broms’ conference in Auckland loaded on
to our Bromeliad Society of New Zealand website for you to view and download. You will be able to see show
plants, plant displays and some people shots. Please visit www.bsnz.org and click on the ‘Cool Broms 2013’ tab.

Show trophy winners…


BeST VRieSeA: Vriesea ‘Tasman Rose’ –
Peter Coyle


Best NZ Hybrid: Vriesea ‘Summer
Fever’ – Andrew Maloy


Tillandsia tectorum. This
plant from Brian and Natalie Simmonds of Tauranga was
judged ‘Best Tillandsia’, ‘Best
Bromeliad Species’ and overall
‘Champion of the Show’.
Best Aechmea:
Aechmea ‘Pickaniny’ – John Mitchell


Visit our website to view ‘Cool Broms’ photos…
Shortly we will have a selection of photos from the
March 2013 ‘Cool Broms’ conference in Auckland
loaded on to our Bromeliad Society of New Zealand
website for you to view and download. You will be able
to see show plants, plant displays and some people
shots. Please visit www.bsnz.org and click on the
‘Cool Broms 2013’ tab.

2013 ANNUAL SHOW
TROPHY WINNERS

Best Aechmea John Mitchell – Aechmea ‘Pickaniny’
Best Billbergia Judy Graham – Billbergia vittata ‘Domingos Martins’
Best Guzmania Bev Ching – Guzmania wittmackii
Best Neoregelia Peter Coyle – Neoregelia ‘Garnish’
Best Tillandsia Natalie Simmonds – Tillandsia tectorum
Best Vriesea Peter Coyle – Vriesea ‘Tasman Rose’
Best New Zealand Hybrid Andrew Maloy – Vriesea ‘Summer Fever’
Best Bromeliad Species Natalie Simmonds – Tillandsia tectorum
Best Miniature Neoregelia Judy Graham – Neoregelia lilliputiana
Best Bromeliad Arrangement David Goss
Best Artistic Arrangement Lynette Nash
Most Points of the Show Peter Coyle
Champion of the Show Natalie Simmonds – Tillandsia tectorum

2013 ANNUAL SHOW CLASS WINNERS

Class 1 – Aechmea BloomingClass 6 – Bromeliad Species

1st
1st

John Mitchell Aechmea ‘Pickaniny’ Peter Coyle Quesnelia marmorata
2nd Noelene Ritson Aechmea nudicaulis ‘Tim Plowman’
var aequalis 2nd Nancy Murphy Aechmea nudicaulis
3rd Peter Waters Aechmea nudicaulis var capitata
var capitata 3rd Nancy Murphy Quesnelia arvensis
(red form)

Class 3 – Billbergia

1st

Judy Graham Billbergia vittata Class 7 – Neoregelia

1st

‘Domingos Martins’ Peter Coyle Neoregelia ‘Apricot

2nd Peter Waters
Billbergia vittata Nectar’ x ‘Jewellery Shop’
‘Domingos Martins’ 2nd Peter Coyle Neoregelia ‘Totara Gold’
x ‘Sangre’ 3rd Peter Waters Neoregelia ‘Storm

3rd Peter Waters
Billbergia ‘Hallelujah’ Warning’
F2 #3

Class 8 – Neoregelia midi size

1st

Class 4 – Cryptanthus
Peter Coyle Neoregelia ‘24 Carat’

1st

Peter Waters Cryptanthus 2nd Peter Coyle Neoregelia ‘From the
argyrophyllus
Heart’
3rd Alan Cliffe Neoregelia ‘Blueberry
Class 5 – Guzmania Tiger’ F2

1st

Bev Ching Guzmania wittmackii
2nd David Cowie Guzmania sanguinea
(tricolor)

Cont’d P10

Cont’d from P9– 2013 Annual Show Class Winners

Class 9 – Nidularium

1st

Peter Coyle Nidularium innocentii

(albomarginated)
2nd Peter Waters Nidularium procerum
3rd Bev Ching Nidularium

atalaiaense

Class 10 – Tillandsia Small Blooming

1st

Peter Coyle Tillandsia stricta
2nd Lynette Nash Tillandsia latifolia
‘Enano Red Form’
3rd Bev Ching Tillandsia crocata

Class 11 – Tillandsia Small Foliage

1st

Jo Elder Tillandsia tectorum
2nd Lynette Nash Tillandsia argentina
3rd Peter Coyle Tillandsia recurvifolia

var subsecundifolia

Class 14 – Tillandsia Large Blooming

1st

Lynette Nash Tillandsia crocata
2nd Peter Coyle Tillandsia cardenasii
3rd Alan Cliffe Tillandsia confertiflora

Class 15 – Tillandsia Large Foliage

=1st Natalie Simmonds
Tillandsia tectorum

=1st Judy Graham Tillandsia aeranthos
3rd

Peter Coyle Tillandsia treptophylla

Class 16 – Vriesea Blooming

1st

John Mitchell Vriesea ‘Dark Knight’

x ‘Snowman’
2nd Peter Waters Vriesea racinae
3rd John Lambert Vriesea ospinae

var gruberi

Class 17 – Vriesea Foliage

1st

Peter Coyle Vriesea ‘Tasman
Rose’
2nd Andrew Maloy Vriesea ‘Kiwi
Burgundy Delight’
3rd Peter Coyle Vriesea ‘Nova Queen’

Class 18 – Bigeneric or other unlisted genus

1st

Andrew Maloy Quesnelia marmorata
‘Tim Plowman’
2nd Bev Ching Acanthostachys
pitcairnioides
3rd Andrew Devonshire xCanmea ‘Wild
Leopard’ F2

Class 19 – Miniature bromeliad

1st

Judy Graham Neoregelia lilliputiana
2nd Diana Holt Neoregelia ‘Tara Mite’
3rd Andrew Devonshire Dyckia fosteriana x

fosteriana (2 clones)

Class 20 – Variegated bromeliad

1st

Andrew Maloy Vriesea ‘Kiwi Green
and Gold’
2nd Peter Coyle Neoregelia
‘Garnish’
3rd Lester Ching Neoregelia ‘Dr Oeser’
(variegated)

Class 21 – Pitcairnioideae

1st

Audrey Hewson Deuterocohnia
brevifolia
2nd Andrew Devonshire Dyckia marnierlapostollei
x ‘Charlot’

Class 23 – Dish or tray garden
or novelty planting

1st

Nancy Murphy
2nd Judy Graham
3rd David Goss

Class 24 – Bromeliad arrangement

1st

David Goss
2nd Lynette Nash
3rd David Goss

Class 25 – Artistic or floral arrangement

1st

Lynette Nash
2nd Lynette Nash
3rd Betty Goss

Class 26 – Decorative container

1st

David Goss Neoregelia ‘Best
of Both’
2nd Chris Paterson Neoregelia ‘Hannibal
Lector’
3rd Lynette Nash Tillandsia cardenasii

Class 27 – Hanging container

1st

Peter Waters Neoregelia ‘Ornato’
2nd Andrew Devonshire Neoregelia ‘Ritzy
Tiger’
3rd Judy Graham Neoregelia pauciflora

Class 28 – New Zealand Hybrid

1st

Andrew Maloy
Vriesea ‘Kiwi Summer
Fever’ (A Maloy)

1st

Rhonda Maloy
Vriesea ‘Kiwi Berries &
Cream’ (A Maloy)

3rd Peter Coyle
Neoregelia ‘Apricot
Nectar’ x ‘Jewellery
Shop’ (P Coyle)

Class 29 – Original Bromeliad Artwork

1st

Andrew Devonshire
2nd Andrew Devonshire
3rd Jo Elder


BeST GuZMANiA:
Guzmania wittmacki – Bev Ching
Dyckia fosteriana x fosteriana
(2 clones) – Andrew Devonshire
BeST NeOReGeLiA: Neoregelia ‘Garnish’ –
Peter Coyle


Vriesea ‘Kiwi Green and Gold’ – Andrew Maloy

BeST BiLLBeRGiA: Billbergia vittata‘Domingos Martins’ – Judy Graham
Neoregelia ‘Ornato’ – Peter Waters
BeST BROMeLiAD ARRANGeMeNT:
David Goss

NZ hybrids display –
Andrew Maloy’s plants.
Graham and Carol Allen
(Melbourne).
Jeanette Waters’ display.
From left Peter Tristram (Repton) with Chris
Larson (Melbourne) and Geoff Lawn (Perth).
Rhonda Stokoe and Peter Pomroy(Gympie, Queensland).
Welcome to the Cole theatre.
in the impressive theatre at the
Waipuna Conference Centre
‘Have i got
$500 to
start us off’.
Auctioneer,
Peter Coyle.
NZ hybrids display –
Andrew Maloy’s plants.
Graham and Carol Allen
(Melbourne).
Jeanette Waters’ display.
From left Peter Tristram (Repton) with Chris
Larson (Melbourne) and Geoff Lawn (Perth).
Rhonda Stokoe and Peter Pomroy(Gympie, Queensland).
Welcome to the Cole theatre.
in the impressive theatre at the
Waipuna Conference Centre
‘Have i got
$500 to
start us off’.
Auctioneer,
Peter Coyle.

Visit our website to view ‘Cool Broms’ photos…
Diane and Ross Smith (Tea Gardens).
Nancy Murphy and her team did agrand job with the Society displays.
Sheryl and Len Waite
(Sunshine Coast).
At Andrew Maloy’s nursery.
Sales action.
Show plants.
Shortly we will have a selection of photos from the March 2013 ‘Cool Broms’ conference in Auckland loaded on
to our Bromeliad Society of New Zealand website for you to view and download. You will be able to see show
plants, plant displays and some people shots. Please visit www.bsnz.org and click on the ‘Cool Broms 2013’ tab.


Aechmea fasciata.

Aechmea fasciata and some varieties…


Aechmea ‘Sangria’ mutation.

Aechmea fasciata ivory’.
14


Focus on Aechmea fasciata
and some varieties

– Lyn Wegner, writing in the East London Bromeliad Society (South Africa),
Newsletter, January 2013.

These beautiful silver-grey foliaged
plants originate from the rain
forests in the Rio de Janeiro area.
The foliage is banded and scurfy, which
is the white furry coating on the leaf.
They are sometimes referred to as the
‘urn plant’ or ‘silver vase plant’. It is
the most well-known and widely grown
Aechmea. They require bright light with
some morning sun. Some of our members
are growing them in sunny spots
successfully. They bloom when the plant
is about 3 years old. The inflorescence
is long lasting and attractive, in pastel
shades of pink and blue. The plants pup
freely and splitting is easy.

Plants that just don’t want to bloom are
probably planted in too much shade.
Moving them to a brighter spot should
solve this problem but if it persists,
try placing a ripe apple or a few cores
around the plant, enclose it in a clear
plastic packet and leave it in a shady
area for a week or two. The apples give
off ethylene gas which is said to induce
flowering. If you are struggling with
your Aechmea fasciata try this trick!

Another problem can be browning of the
leaf tips. This is an indication that your
plant is too dry. The leaves also suffer if
your climate is too cold. The grey form
is the most common in our gardens but
there are other very nice variations such
as the albo-marginated form, variegated,
spineless and the purple form, Aechmea
fasciata var. purpurea. Aechmea
‘Sangria’ is a cultivar of fasciata v.
purpurea. My Aechmea ‘Sangria’
variegated form has poor variegation.

I wonder if that is usually the case or
maybe I have a poor plant or maybe it
should be fertilized. I’m not good about
that! Maybe I will try giving it a little
Epsom Salts. Watch this space!

These forms all have the same beautiful
pink and blue inflorescence. When a plant
has striking foliage I don’t really need a
flower too. They grow well epiphytically
(mounted) so have fun mounting them
in your trees. I was recently given some
wood poles so I’m looking forward
to mounting some Aechmea fasciata
varieties. I just have to find a space!

The bromeliads pictured are Aechmea
fasciata mutations which formed during
a tissue culture process. The large red
stripey brom is an A. ‘Sangria’ mutation
which has been in SA for many years
and I wonder if it has a name. I prefer
it mounted as it gets a bit straggly and
untidy when potted. The smaller of
the other two, which are both Chester
Skotak releases, is Aechmea ‘Pagoda’.
This is a 2010 release and you can read
all about it in the very interesting article
in the March-April 2012 BSI Journal.
Aechmea ‘Stalker’ was released last year
at the World Conference.

Here is a question I have been asked on
numerous occasions and I don’t know
the answer! Almost all of my fasciatas
have rather large inflorescences.
The question is, do you get different
size inflorescences for this particular
bromeliad? I recently posed the question
to Jay Thurrott (President of the BSI)
and this was his response:

Cont’d P16 15


Cont’d from P15 – Focus on Aechmea fasciata and some varieties

“That’s an interesting question
regarding the size of inflorescences on
bromeliads. When I first got started on
this hobby, I frequently heard how, with
a few exceptions, it made little difference
whether you fertilized your plants or not.
Now, after accumulating a few (ok, make
that a lot!) years of experience, there’s
no doubt in my mind that providing
optimum cultural conditions (and that
includes an appropriate fertilisation
program) can make all the difference in
the world in the ultimate appearance of
your bromeliads.

Aechmeas seem to be one of those groups
that respond to fertilizing by becoming
more robust. Leaf colours and markings
are more pronounced and blooms are
often larger and with brighter colours.
So, I would say that you have hit on just
the right growing conditions for your
fasciatas… or you have a particularly
nice clone – another possibility.
Probably at this point you will say ‘but I
don’t fertilize my plants’– well, Aechmea
fasciata is one of those bromeliads that
also responds dramatically to other
cultural conditions such as the amount
of light provided, temperature, and
humidity. If your blooms are consistently
larger and brighter than what you see
elsewhere, it’s likely due to you providing
optimum growing conditions.

I’ve often seen where hobbyists wonder
why they seem to be able to grow a
specific bromeliad to perfection that
their friends have difficulty even keeping
alive, and it usually turns out to be some
combination of light, temperature and
humidity (watering practices) that they
may be intentionally or inadvertently
providing - they’ve just hit on the perfect
combination of growing conditions for
that particular plant.

Many years ago I received the advice to
be selective in what bromeliads I decide
to add to my collection. Some plants will
grow very well under the conditions that
I can provide, with little extra care, while
others do poorly despite sometimes
Herculean efforts to keep them alive.
I note those that do well and expand
on my collection by acquiring more
bromeliads from that same group or that
are native to that same area and respond
well to those same growing conditions.
This may be a lazy way of doing things,
but I find it much more satisfying to have
a group of nice looking plants rather
than a bunch of dead or dying plants
that I fret over. So, anyway, in answer to
your question: Yes. You most certainly
can get different size inflorescences…
depending on the growing conditions
that are provided to the plant. This is
one of the difficult issues that bromeliad
show judges face –the same named plant,
grown in different areas of the country
or world, can look radically different.
Which appearance then is the ‘right’
one and the one that should be rewarded
with highest level of ribbon or medal?
The answer is that optimum shape,
colour, and overall condition of the plant
will still carry the day, even though the
colour and size may vary, depending on
the growing conditions provided.”

Many thanks Jay for your very
informative and interesting response!


Alcantarea vinicolor

seed wanted.
Contact Bruce 09 4227 057
0274 776646
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Heroic Gardens

– Photos by Alan J. Thomson
Craig and Bronwyn Thorburn’s
garden in Titirangi.


Kevin Kilsby/Brent Scott’s
garden in Mt Albert.
Peter Brady’s garden in Mt Albert.
17


Don O’Connor/Craig Jensen’s
garden in Herne Bay.

 
Robert Langholm/Simon Misdale’s
garden in Mt Albert.
18

Heroic Gardens, February 2013

– Words and photos by Alan J. Thomson
This year’s Heroic Gardens trail
offered 24 gardens to visit over a
weekend in February. In previous
years I have been concerned about the
weather and then relieved if it turned
out OK but with this year’s relentless
summer I just assumed it would be
fine… and it was!

I worked out a schedule of gardens to
visit and with a packed lunch I set off.
Quite a number of new gardens were
included including a batch of three I
went to in Titirangi. The Thorburn’s
garden there was a big affair and set out
like a house and garden from the deep
south of the U.S. or perhaps a colonial
feel out of a private estate in Singapore.
It is divided into themed rooms with a
Balinese area you entered through a huge
concrete arch ablaze with neoregelias.
Behind their house is a shaded woody
area with its own stream and partitioned
with a fence of Spanish moss (Tillandsia
usneoides).

Tillandsias really stood out for me on this
trail but maybe this is because I’m more
tuned into them these days. The bonsai
garden of Robert Langholm/Simon
Misdale is always a delight and they
have huge clumps of Tillandsia bergeri
hanging from pergolas above their
bonsai collection. What was particularly
interesting is the self seeding of their
tillandsias with the seeds falling and new
plants popping up in available crevices
on the miniature trees below!

Grahame Dawson/Alex Ross have an
amazing garden behind Mt. Eden village

and there are lots of clumps of Spanish
moss hanging in drifts. Some people
have the secret to make this thrive and
grow and when it’s looking full and
healthy it adds a lot to your garden.

There was a strong use of bright red
neoregelias this year, helped along no
doubt by the long summer. It surprised
me how the red miniatures in clumps
seemed to stand out more than their
bigger cousins.

Larger vrieseas are increasingly
becoming focal points. These were
mostly in evidence at the gardens of
Don O’Connor in Herne Bay and Kevin
Kilsby in Mt. Albert. Their constancy
over the year is a great factor whereas
other species shine and fade and so this
has increased their popularity.

I loved seeing a mass planting of
Aechmea ‘Blue Rain’ all out in flower
and I was told that these are not being
continued at garden centres because the
fad has faded. I was disappointed to hear
this because I think they are a welcome
addition to any garden and sufficiently
distinctive and appealing to warrant
regular supply!

I see a strong and continued use of
bromeliads at many of the gardens
on show, a trend that will continue
particularly as we ‘move up’ to make
more use of walls and trees.

I’m already looking forward to next
year’s trail. Hope to see you there!

OFFICERS


Patron: Patricia Sweeney Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
President: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272 Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Vice Presidents: Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451 Committee: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Don Brown 09-361 6175 Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671 David Cowie 09-630 8220
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616 Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt, Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366
Len Trotman, Patricia Sweeney,
Peter Waters

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Regular Writers

Andrew Devonshire
Graeme Barclay
John and Agatha Lambert

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
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Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

‘Buy & Swap’

Listings in ‘Buy & Swap’ are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Group News

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Sandra Wheeler
Our March Meeting held at Reyburn
House Studio was also our AGM and
was attended by 27 members. Departing
President Jan Mahoney was replaced by
Tracy Ellison with the Vice President,
Secretary and Treasurer all standing for
another term. Jan was presented with a
bouquet of flowers and thanked for her
five years as President.

Maureen Green and Freda Nash were
made Life Members of the Group for
all their work and commitment over
the years. Maureen is a foundation
member who has shared her knowledge
generously. Freda spent over 10 years
volunteering on behalf of the Group at
the Whangarei Quarry Gardens where
her work among the bromeliads is much
admired by visitors today. Unfortunately
neither Maureen nor Freda were able to
be present at the meeting and their Life
Member badges and flowers have been
delivered to them.

Competition:

1st

Aileen Hayward – Neoregelia
‘Perfection’, 2nd Gail Atkins – Aechmea
fasciata, 3rd Lyn White – Neoregelia
‘Aussie Dream’ x ‘Big Pinkie’

Guest Speaker David Muir, Project
Manager of the Whangarei Quarry
Gardens came and spoke of the plans
for the Gardens. The new Visitor Centre
project is at the stage of applying for
funds with a view to begin building
early in 2014. This will give groups like
ours a permanent place to hold meeting
during the winter months. David
expressed disappointment that there was
not a specialised bromeliad grower at

the recent Subtropical Plant Fair in the
Gardens and would like to correct that at
next year’s event.

Next Meeting: Sunday 28th April at
1.30pm to be held at Bev and Brian
Hutchings, 16 Three Mile Bush Road,
Kamo.


Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Jo Elder
We had a reasonable turnout of 46
members for our March 2013 meeting
and AGM, which went very smoothly,
with Lynley Breeze remaining as
President. Kevin Pritchard is now
Vice-President, Wilma Fitzgibbons is
Membership Database Secretary, and
Maxine August remains as Treasurer and
Jo Elder as Secretary. The committee
remains the same.

After the AGM we held a ‘Fun Auction’
which was a great success. Many thanks
to all who brought along goodies to be
auctioned and all those who assisted with
the smooth running of the auction.

Garden visits were made this month to
Trinny Edge who is not a member of our
group but who is a great supporter of our
sales days. Trinny grows her vrieseas
and alcantareas in large pots filled with
orchid mix and adds several tablespoons
of fertiliser in the spring. Consequently
she grows the largest plants I have ever
seen! We then went to the lovely garden
of Tonny and Marcel Authier. Sadly, this
will be our last visit to this garden as they
have now moved to a retirement village
where Marcel is educating the residents
about bromeliads.

Cont’d from P21 – Group News

On behalf of the members of the Bay of
Plenty Bromeliad Group and especially
those members who attended the ‘Cool
Broms’ conference at Waipuna Hotel
I wish to congratulate the Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand conference
committee for all their hard work in
preparing for a wonderful occasion.
It was absolutely splendid – ‘WELL
DONE’.

Next Meeting: May 8th at the TYPB
clubrooms, Sulphur Point, at 12.30pm.
The plant of the month is Bi-generics

i.e. a cross of two genera. The speaker
will be Kevin Pritchard who will discuss
some good bromeliad websites and
also will give advice on winter plant
protection. Garden Visits: May 15th
beginning at 10 am. The first garden will
be Gwen McCallum, 4A Esme Place,
Matua. The second garden: Jan Missen,
53 Levers Road, Matua.
South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
Our April meeting at the home of Win
Shorrock at Manurewa. Win’s garden
is a veritable treasure trove, packed
with bromeliads and there is not one
spare space anywhere. You would never
know that her neighbour’s rabbits had
got into her garden and devoured some
of her precious plants. Her Tillandsia
usneoides were amazing and definitely
flourishing and of course, being the
Queen of tillandsias, there were very
many other varieties. In particular her
beautiful Tillandsia tectorum plants
grabbed attention.

Next the home of Jeanette Lenz at
Wattle Downs. This garden has really
matured since our last visit with lots to

see, including Jeanette’s pottery pieces
which she made herself.

Graham West read out a card from
Jocelyn Hunter following her husband,
Barry’s recent passing; and we all
offer our condolences to Jocelyn and
her family. He also mentioned that we
had received a card from the Far North
Group thanking us for joining them for
their 10th anniversary celebrations.

Graham advised that we were planning
on changing the rules of the group and
members were provided with copies of
the proposed amendments for approval
at the AGM in May.

The raffles were won Pat Labrum, Ian
Stewart, and Norma Cook.

Next Meeting and AGM: 1:30pm on
5th May at the Auckland Botanic Gardens,

102 Hill Road, Manurewa. Members
are asked to bring along their favourite


plant and talk about the conditions under
which it is being grown – we all learn
lots from other members’ experiences.

Hawke’s Bay Bromeliad Group
– Julie Greenhill
For our March meeting our group
collected at Denie Dreaver’s lovely
home on the hills of Havelock North.
Looking out at their beautiful panoramic
view we were reminded how desperately
dry the whole area is. Here’s hoping we
get some decent rain soon for everyone
who needs it. There were no competition
plants this month as is usual on garden
visits although quite a good lot of sales
plants were available.

Everyone was keen to hear from
those who went to the ‘Cool Broms’
conference, so we had a quick overview
from the few who went and will be
looking forward to seeing the DVD
when it arrives.

There was a good discussion on different
ways of attracting new members and
which methods were most preferred and
we also discussed and made changes to
the categories we have for presenting
trophies at the end of each competition
year.

Our next meeting will be the AGM and
we will have a projector available so that
we can have a look at a lot of the show
plants and gardens from the conference.

Next Meeting: AGM 28th April St Johns
Hall 2.00pm.


Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad
and Orchid Group – Alison Iremonger

A garden ramble is always popular
with our members, so for our March
meeting we visited five very different
gardens. The day was hot and sunny.
The first garden, belonging to Sandy
Lawrie, is large and well established.
Members enjoy visiting his garden with
its wonderful selection of plants and
Sandy’s vast knowledge of what he has
in the garden. The large trees provide
shelter.

The second garden belonged to Franz
and Ria De Ruiter. This was a blank
canvas 3 years ago, and Ria now calls
it her ‘Tropical Paradise’. A selection of
bromeliads, clivias, palms and vireyas
make up the garden.

Our next garden belonged to Ann

Kebbell. Ann is well known in
Whakatane for her paintings but also
enjoys her garden. It was lovely to look
at the selection of plants she had.

Barbara and Alan Rogers’country garden
was our next stop. We have visited this
garden many times and it always looks
a picture. Barbara puts a lot of thought
into what goes with what, and had plants
for sale.

Our last garden belonged to Carol and
Bob Gee. Bob enjoys making garden art
and once again members were able to
purchase pieces of his work. No matter
how many times we visit this garden it
always looks stunning. Plenty of colour,
immaculately presented and a fine view
across the road to the harbour.

Afternoon tea was served and then the
meeting took place. Sue welcomed 26
members and thanked those members
who had opened their gardens for the
afternoon. A report was given on the
‘Cool Broms’conference. Our judge then
looked at the plants in the competition,
giving some tips on plant presentation.

1st place – Ross Fergusson with Aechmea
2nd

fasciata ‘Kiwi’, place – Rose
Magee with Neoregelia ‘Rosy Morn’ x
‘Takemura’, 3rd place – Gail Fergusson
with Neoregelia ‘Stargazer’.

Next month’s competition is for vrieseas.
Ross Fergusson talked about a fertiliser
he has procured and is available for
members to purchase.

Next Meeting: Matata Community Hall
16th June. Visitors are always welcome
to our meetings. Contacts: Maureen
Moffat 07-3222276, Ross Fergusson 073125487
or Sue Laurent 07-3071323.

Article and photo
by Graeme Barclay
Article and photo
by Graeme Barclay
This month’s hybrids have become a favourite in collections around the world and
have been widely used to create many more plants.

Neoregelia
‘Hannibal Lector’, ‘Clarise’ and ‘The Governor’s Plea’

In the mid to late 1990s, after
importing the first Neoregelia
carcharodon ‘Tiger’ plants from
Brazil, Chester Skotak of Costa Rica
made one of the most famous neoregelia
crosses. At the time the mother plant
was known as Neoregelia punctatissima,
but we now know it as Neoregelia
‘Rafa’, which is possibly a large form of
ampullacea, (yet to be confirmed). The
resulting cross, using Skotak’s ‘Tiger’ as
the pollen parent, produced Neoregelia
‘Hannibal Lector’ – a highly zonated
plant, much larger than ampullacea, with
very regular, dark zonated bandings.

Two other plants were supposedly
selected from the same grex, though
they could have come from very similar
grexes or re-makes of the original. They
became Neoregelia ‘The Governor’s
Plea’ and Neoregelia ‘Clarise’. While
similar, ‘Clarise’tends to have a ‘cleaner’

Neoregelia ‘Clarise’ grown hard in
high light.


zonation pattern than ‘The Governor’s
Plea’. Both are larger with slightly
wider leaves than ‘Hannibal Lector’.

They readily self-set seed and many
grexes have been grown out as ‘Hannibal
Lector F2’ or ‘Clarise F2’ seedlings,

– the accepted name for a second
generation from the original plant. These
‘F2’ seedlings can vary from very dark
purple, to lime-green and burnt-orange
leaved clones, with varied patterns of
zonation and overall size. The variety
of seedlings suggests the original ‘Rafa’
(or possible other unknown mother of
‘Clarise’ and ‘The Governor’s Plea’) is a
hybrid of Brazilian origin.
Neoregelia ‘Clarise’ and ‘The
Governor’s Plea’ are more common in
NZ than the straight ‘Hannibal Lector’.
They are medium size, reaching around
30cm wide and up to 40cm high when
fully mature. They will take full sun all
year round, though some mid summer
protection is advised to ensure the best
form. When grown hard in high light and
a warm environment, they attain a nice
orange/red hue to the underside of the
golden-green leaves. They clump well
and make great specimens for mounting
on tree limbs, stumps and rocks, where
the light enhances the leaf colour and
zonations. For the best form and colour,
ensure fertiliser is only applied when
young and they’re protected from cold
winter temperatures, which tends to
cause the lower leaves to curl up and die
off prematurely.

 

1
Part of the stunning welcoming display thatgreeted attendees at ‘Cool Broms’, March 2013
May 2013VOL 53 NO 5
• DNA analysis means new plant classifications and names
• Getting ready for winter again
Part of the stunning welcoming display thatgreeted attendees at ‘Cool Broms’, March 2013
May 2013VOL 53 NO 5
• DNA analysis means new plant classifications and names
• Getting ready for winter again

Images that set a
theme for ‘Cool Broms’


– By Murray Mathieson. Photography by Andrew Devonshire.
We wanted some bold visual statements to greet attendees at the Waipuna
Conference Centre – visuals that would really sum up what the conference
was all about. We had four large wall banners (each 1.7metres deep) right
outside the entrance to the theatre… with headings ‘LISTEN’, ‘SHARE’, ‘ADMIRE’
and ‘ENJOY’. Andrew Devonshire produced some superb ‘macro’ images that were
a talked about feature at the conference.

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc
Bromeliad Journal – May 2013 issue
CONTENTS
‘Cool Broms’ images – Murray Mathieson 2
President’s Page – Jocelyn Coyle 4
Bromeliad Society April meeting news – Dave Anderson 5
Cairns Botanic Gardens – Alan J. Thomson 7
DNA analysis means new genera – Peter Waters 9
Bromeliads and winter – Dave Anderson 10
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 11
Brazil’s amazing bromeliads and Roberto Burle Marx 12
Hiroyuki Takizawa… Tillandsia explorer – Herb Plever 14
Group News 16
‘Librarians Corner’ – Noelene Ritson 18
Classic Brom corner – Graeme Barclay 20

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 16 for details of group meeting
times and venues.

MAY JUNE

2nd

26th Northland Group meeting South Auckland Group meeting
28th Society monthly meeting at 12th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and 16th Eastern Bay of Plenty Group
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The meeting
Monthly Choice competition: Best red 25th Society monthly meeting at
plants. We will show a ‘Cool Broms’ Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and
conference video. Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The

Monthly Choice competition: Albomarginated
plants. Our speaker will be
Shane Weston, the President of the Gold
Coast Bromeliad Society.

FRONT COVER: A section of the display that greeted ‘Cool Broms’ attendees as
they walked into the conference centre. Thanks to Nancy Murphy and her team and
all the members who loaned us plants to make up some fabulous displays.


PRESIDENT’S PAGE

It is with pleasure that I present
my annual report as president of
the Bromeliad Society of New
Zealand.

Looking back over the last 12 months
has made me realise what we have
achieved over that time. Our one day
plant sales are always very popular and
well attended by both buyers and sellers
looking for some plants to add to their
collection or for the garden. This has
certainly been the case after our very
dry summer. Thanks to Noelene, Laura
and Denis for the wonderful display
they put together in the foyer. It is
always admired and appreciated by
all. Thanks also to the helpers, sellers
and buyers. It is always a day that runs
smoothly with everyone doing what
they can to help.

In July we celebrated the 50th
anniversary of the Society and it was
interesting to be able to look back over
magazines, newsletters and articles
to gather some insight into how we
have grown to what we are today. Our
celebration supper was enjoyed by all.

A big thank you to all the members that
participate in bringing plants along for
the monthly competition tables. I know
there is always a bit of work involved
in getting them ready but to be able to
see them on the tables is appreciated
by everyone and is an enjoyable part
of the evening.

The garden visits have been superb and

well attended by members enjoying
not only the magnificent gardens and
hospitality but also on seeing how
other people grow their bromeliads.
I would like to thank all those people
who opened their gardens for us to
visit.

‘Cool Broms’ 2013 – well, what can I
say. The many emails and comments
that we have had from so many people
say it all. It was a conference that
was enjoyed and will be remembered
by all. I think the opening kapa haka
performed by the Otahuhu College
pupils set the scene for the rest of the
conference. A huge thank you to Peter
Waters and his committee for putting
it all together and all those wonderful
people who helped make this a
conference to remember.

Last but not least, I would like to thank
the committee for their dedication
and involvement in helping towards a
smooth running Society, and of course
to all our members because without
you there would not be a Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand.

I look forward to being involved and
working with you for another term.

Jocelyn Coyle

P.S. Congratulations to the incoming
bromeliad group committees around
the country. If possible, could you
please forward a list of your committee
members to me or to David Anderson.

Bromeliad Society
April Meeting News – Dave Anderson

The AGM was well attended.
Jocelyn read her annual report
before taking nominations for
the executive and committee – see the
elected members in this journal. The
general monthly meeting followed the
AGM starting at 7.55pm.

The ‘Cool Broms’ conference held in
Auckland at the Waipuna Hotel was
a great success with many accolades
from attendees both here in NZ and
overseas. Jocelyn asked if anyone
had photos from the conference of the
visits to the gardens of Totara Waters
on Saturday and Lester and Bev
Ching’s on Sunday, if so would you
please get in touch with a member of
the committee.

We are intending to have a bus trip
to visit some gardens in Tauranga in
November and will keep members
informed when arrangements have
been made. The competition plant this
month is ‘Best White’ and next month
(May) it will be ‘Best Red’.

Peter Coyle brought in some seedlings
he had grown from Judy Graham’s
Aechmea recurvata hybrid that has
lovely red and black coloured flowers.
These were free to be grown on by
members. Laura Weber had brought
in a cake to be had with the supper
break to thank all those members who
had donated them plants to replace the
ones they had stolen.

The monthly meeting started with
the ‘Show and Tell’. First up was a

billbergia that had white fungi like
spores growing in the potting mix. The
owner asked what the white spores
were and if it was a problem what
could be done about it. The response
was that it probably was a type of
fungi that commonly grows in potting
mix and it did not affect the growth of
bromeliads. Next and wanting a name
was the hybrid Aechmea flavorosea x
fasciata that had been bred by the late
Gerry Stansfield with a reddish/pink
coloured flower spike. Lastly was a
possible Tillandsia paleacea with the
owner querying whether indeed it was
this plant? It probably was the named
species as it grows over a vast area of
South America from sea level to 3,000
metres. The small Peruvian variety is
only 6 cm wide and 8 cm long whereas
some of the cliff growing specimens
can be 20cm wide and 35 cm long.

Alan Cliffe then gave a very interesting
talk on the control of insects and fungi
on bromeliads.

The special raffle prize was won by
Bob Doran.

The door prizes went to Dennis Dufty,
Isobel Dryburgh and Hawi Winter.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First was Peter
Coyle with xNeophytum ‘Blaze’ – a
plant that was about 60 cm across with
narrow red leaves. Second was Lester
Ching with Hohenbergia correiaaraujoi
– a very colourful species.

Cont’d P6


Cont’d from P5 – Bromeliad Society April Meeting News

In the competition were Aechmea
caudata cv ‘Melanocrater’; Billbergia
‘Domingos Martins’ x (‘Fantasia’
x ‘Afterglow’); Edmundoa lindenii
(variegated); Guzmania ‘Grand Prix’
and Neoregelia ‘Avon Ryan’.
Open Foliage: First was Peter Coyle
with Vriesea fenestralis – a clump of
3 plants that always looks great when
grown well. Second was John Mitchell
with Vriesea ‘Tasman hybrid’ x ‘Vista’.
In the competition were Neoregelia
johannis cv, ‘Lena Regina’, ‘Hot
Gossip’, ‘Tiger Cat’ x ‘Puerto Rico’;
Quesnelia ‘Tim Plowman’; Vriesea
‘Carlsbad’, ‘Jewel Hybrid’, ‘Pacific
Blush’ and ‘Sunset’ x fosteriana.
Tillandsia: Alan Cliffe’s Tillandsia
straminea x cacticola was first
and second was Lester Ching with
Tillandsia crocata – a clump with
many fragrant flowers in bloom. On the
table were Tillandsia caput-medusae,
comarapaensis, crocata, disticha,
neglecta, multicaulis and stricta (hard
leaf).
Neoregelia: First was Peter Coyle with
Neoregelia ‘Absolutely Fabulous’ – a
most attractive plant that also won
Plant of the Month. Nancy Murphy
was second with Neoregelia (carolinae
x cruenta) x (‘Bobbie Hull’ x ‘Tiger’).
In the competition were Neoregelia
tristis x ampullacea, ‘Best of Both’
x ‘Skotak’s Tiger’, ‘Black Devil’
x lilliputiana, ‘Bobby Dazzler’,
‘Chiquita Linda’, ‘Hannibal Lector’ x
‘Foster’s Pink Tips’, ‘Midas Touch’ x
‘Sheer Delight’, ‘Painted Delight’ and
‘Tigrina’ x ‘Flaming Lovely’.

Monthly Choice – ‘Best White’:

First was Peter Coyle with Vriesea
‘Creme de la Creme’ that looked
superb inheriting the white colouration

in the leaves from its parents Vriesea
‘Snowman’ and Vriesea ‘Candyman’,
John Mitchell was second with
Vriesea ‘Snowman’. The other plants
in the competition were Billbergia
‘Fantasia’, ‘Hallelujah’; Neoregelia
chlorosticta ‘Marble Throat’; Vriesea
‘Vista’, ‘Tutea Spray’, ‘Happy Day’,
‘Beach Dawn’, ‘Vista’F2 and ‘Tasman
Hybrid’.

The Plant of the Month went to Peter
Coyle with Neoregelia ‘Absolutely
Fabulous’.

Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING:

General Meeting Tuesday 28th May.

COMING UP
Society ‘Plant of the month’competitions:
MAY
Best red
JUNE
Albo-marginated
JULY
Nidularium
AUGUST
Vriesea – Rose colour
SEPTEMBER
Aechmea recurvata
OCTOBER
Canistrum
NOVEMBER
Xmas decorations with broms

Cairns Botanic Gardens…
variety and tropical colour

– Article and photos by Alan J. Thomson
Cairns Botanic Gardens are a
tropical paradise where you can
explore the beauty of tropical
plants, relax in stunning surroundings
and learn about tropical flora and
horticulture. The location is northwest
of Cairns and approximately
five kilometres from the town centre.

Over the decades the gardens have
developed with the main areas being
the Flecker Garden, Centenary Lakes
(saltwater and freshwater), Rainforest
boardwalk, Gondwanan Heritage
Garden and the Munro Martin Fern
House. These distinct areas host a
huge variety of plants with perhaps
the main groups being bromeliads,
orchids, heliconias, gingers, palms,
cycads, epiphytes, ferns and a

wide range of carnivorous plants.
I have a fascination with tropical
plants and I’m not sure why. Sure,
they can often be bigger, brighter
and more unusual than ‘stuff’ we can
grow in New Zealand, but there’s
something about being able to grow
such plants in climates like ours where
they struggle. Frangipanis come to
mind as the most borderline plant that
some of us grow here and the Cairns
gardens were full of lots of others
that, shall we say, got me thinking!

The bromeliads on show were
similar to what we have but they
had a lot of bigger ones like mass
plantings of Ursulaea macvaughii
and Alcantarea imperialis (rubra).
Generally they are grown in beds

Billbergia Neo tower Tillandsia usneoides
Cont’d P8


Cont’d from P7 – Cairns Botanical Gardens… variety and tropical colour

Cairns Botanical Gardens…


Ursulaea macvaughii
Alcantarea imperialis (rubra)
Aechmea blanchetiana
under mature palm trees to give them
some protection from the tropical sun.

On the way to the gardens I couldn’t
resist calling in at the local Bunnings.
Walking down the aisles was a very
similar experience to what we have
here – but step into the garden centre
section and whoa, there’s something
very different going on. Lots of big
leafed tropical plants like crotons
and bright colours in red, yellow and
green. A small selection of bromeliads
were all available under cover and a
sign that said ‘Plants for Shade’. Not
a single species was out in the sun.
However, the ones in the botanical
gardens did get quite a bit of sun
so some can certainly deal with the
north Queensland environment.

I was particularly taken with the
Ursulaea macvaughii as it had a
distinctive white flower that opened
up and turned pink, quite unlike any
other bromeliads I’d seen before. A
lot of the plants were epiphytic and
climbing up trees with bromeliads
eagerly taking advantage of crevices
and gaps where they could get a
footing. One tree had a column of
large billbergias and there were a
number of neoregelia ‘towers’ together
with lots of Spanish moss (Tillandsia
usneoides) and other tillandsias.

There is so much to explore in the
gardens that it takes a couple of trips
to do it justice. I had an afternoon
there and was impressed with their
educational garden centre and plans
for the future and I’ll certainly return
on my next trip that way.


DNA analysis means many species
are moving to new genera – Peter Waters


At the recent ‘Cool Broms’
conference one of the speakers,
José Manzanares, gave a most
interesting talk on the work being done
by Michael Barfuss and Walter Till on
the classification of Tillandsioideae
by DNA analysis. The outcome of this
large scale project has produced some
interesting, but in many cases not
surprising, results.

Background…

The classification of bromeliad species
into genera by taxonomists has often
caused some frustration among
collectors as some times it is hard to
accept that a certain plant belongs to
a genus when it looks very similar to
species of a different genus. Such was
the case with Wittrockia amazonica
which closely resembled a nidularium,
but because the petals had appendages
and that was a defining characteristic
that separated Wittrockia from
Nidularium, which had no appendages,
then it seemed to be in the wrong genus.
When Elton Leme produced his total
revision of the nidularioid genera about
15 years ago, and redefined what makes
each genus, then at last Wittrockia
amazonica found its rightful place as
Nidularium amazonicum. No longer
were the appendages on the petals an
important feature.

A few years previously, Jason Grant
had shifted more than 20 vrieseas into
Tillandsia. These were the grey-leaved
species that had always seemed out of
place in Vriesea. But of course they were
there because they bore appendages on
the petals and that separated them from

tillandsias which had naked petals.
In this case, this renaming was not
accepted by many botanists, including
Harry Luther for the simple reason that
Jason had not rewritten the descriptions
of Vriesea and Tillandsia.

DNA analysis…

The arbitrary system devised by
botanists over 100 years ago of
categorising species on characters such
as petal appendages was totally ignored
as the new system of comparing the
DNA was introduced. For the collector
it is going to mean some new labels
will be required as many species have
been moved to new genera. In most
cases, they make sense, for example it
has been suspected that Vriesea ospinae
and Vriesea chrysostachys were distinct
from other vrieseas. They are now in
the new genus Ericgoudaea. Likewise
Vriesea splendens and Vriesea glutinosa
are the two species in Harrylutheria.
Some tillandsias have been renamed
as the genera, Lemeltonia, Josemania
and Barfussia. Other new genera are
Waltillia, Zizkaea and Cipuropsis.

This may seem an awful lot of changes
but at least it has ironed out many of the
problems that have been known to exist.
Most of these new genera only contain
two or three species so Tillandsia and
Vriesea still cover most of the species
we are familiar with.

José Manzanares presented these results
in a most interesting and informative
way and with much subtle humour, that
even the most unscientific person came
away having learnt something.


Bromeliads and cold – preparing
for winter – Adapted from an article by Dave Anderson, first published
in our ‘Bromeliad’ Journal, September 2001.

The northern parts of New Zealand
have a climate that allows the
growing of a large number of
bromeliads outside, all year round. Of
course, additional protection needs to
be given to those species that cannot
withstand the occasional freezing nighttime
temperatures through the five to
six weeks of mid-winter. Winter in
Auckland is typically cold and wet, with
cooler nightly temperatures starting in
late April and a cold wet July and August.
Historically through July-August the
climate in Auckland averages 20-30C
min. and 180 max. with a total 235mm
rainfall. The northern New Zealand
climate with winters usually cool and
wet and summers warm and dryish are
the opposite of the bromeliad’s habitat,
which is mainly cool and dry winters and
hot, wet summers. Bromeliads, when
subjected to frosts (dry cold) where the
leaves have actually frozen, will suffer
badly with the leaves spotting and
turning brown over the following days.
More tender species will just rot out in
the centre. Smaller pups attached to the
parent plant are quite often protected
by the parent plant’s foliage and will
keep growing, particularly when the
weather turns warmer. Plants that have
been subjected to cold rain and wind
will initially appear to be growing
satisfactorily. However, after a couple of
months of the cold, wet weather, plants
become debilitated and rot out in the
centre. Perhaps the plant’s roots have
died, leaving it vulnerable to infection.

Several ways of minimising the
damage from the cold and wet:

1. Remove all old and dead leaves that
form ideal breeding grounds for fungi
also harbouring slugs and snails.
2. Wash out all the broken down sludge
material that accumulates at the base of
leaves and in the centre cup.
3. Spray any plants showing signs of
fungi infection with a fungicide such as
Bravo. NB Do not use copper based
fungicides that are poisonous to
bromeliads.
4. If possible, grow on north to northeast,
sloping land that is frost draining.
5. Shift the plants into a glasshouse
(preferably heated) in the late autumn.
6. Use solar sinks such as large rocks,
brick and concrete walls that warm up
from the sun’s energy during the day and
release the energy at night.
7. Cover the plants with frost cloth
(keeping it clear of the foliage) in the
early evening if a frost is expected.
There are various grades of frost cloth
– the heavier the better. Where heavy
frosts are likely, cover the plants with
corrugated cardboard before placing the
frost cloth.
8. Use the foliage / canopy of taller
plants to ward off frost. One of our
founder members grows many plants
very successfully under citrus trees
(hardy to -6°C) through the winter
months.
9. Grow plants as epiphytes,
suspended high off the ground where the
temperatures do not drop below freezing.
10. Be very careful fertilising. Do not
use nitrogen fertilisers from midsummer
onwards; otherwise plants tend to
produce lush growth that is damaged in
cold weather.

OFFICERS


Patron: Patricia Sweeney Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
President: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272 Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Vice Presidents: Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451 Committee: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Don Brown 09-361 6175 Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671 David Cowie 09-630 8220
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616 Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt, Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366
Len Trotman, Patricia Sweeney,
Peter Waters

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Regular Writers

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John and Agatha Lambert
Alan J. Thomson

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
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Brazil’s amazing bromeliads…

These stirring words were written by famous landscape architect, painter, ecologist
and bromeliad lover, the late Roberto Burle Marx, as the preface to Elton Leme’s
book, ‘Bromeliads in the Brazilian wilderness’, published in 1993. It’s reprinted from

a‘Bromelcairns’ 2013 newsletter.

It is common knowledge that the
number of beings in nature is
virtually endless. The more we seek
new species, the more we realize that we
are still far from discovering everything
we would like, despite the extraordinary
techniques that reveal unknown realms.
Out of an estimated total of 3.5 million
species inhabiting our planet, only some
1.5 million are classified. These figures
reflect the dimensions of our ignorance
and are cause for alarm. In fact, this
indicates that what we think we know
about biodiversity is still very limited.

Here in Brazil, however, a few people
are struggling to reduce the vast gap
revealed by these figures, seeking to
unveil the mysterious lives and hidden
worlds of these species. Elton Leme is
one of these. With his painstaking studies
of bromeliads, in this book he seeks to
portray neglected aspects of Brazilian
Nature, through the magnificent
photography of Luiz Claudio Marigo.

I would like to comment on this family

– the Bromeliaceae – which to me are a
real miracle, an extraordinary revelation.
Curiosity prompted me to work as a
landscape designer. Bromeliads are
always an outstanding feature of special
projects such as the Fazenda Vargem
Grande of Clemente Gomes.
Bromeliads! Smooth or hairy, silvery
or vividly coloured against the light…
they recall human figures, inter-
kingdom hybrids with pineapple-
shaped heads,trimmed with disheveled

Tillandsia usneoides. Some bromeliads
give us the impression that they were
once sea anemones and jellyfish, or
falling stars caught in the treetops,
revealing in loving moments their secrets
in multi-toned leaves, ensuring happier
marriages.

Every time we travel through South
America, and particularly Brazil, we find
huge bromeliads. Sandy coastal plains
feature Aechmea, particularly Aechmea
floribunda. And as for Alcantarea
imperialis? It has gone to the hills in
search of steep escarpments. During the
day they bask in the warmth of the rocks,
bathed at night in the drowsy mists that
rise from the sweat of the afternoon.

The late Roberto Burle Marx.


I never see bromeliads growing alone.
They are always linked to animal life
and even other plants. They are inverse
islands, as they encircle water. Nurseries
for larvae that swim in these grails,
where frogs go to feed and snakes find
the vital balance. Other bromeliads,
as is well known – is it not? – hold the
water needed to slake the thirst of the
Philodendron leal-costae when water
runs short at certain times of year.
I have rarely seen a demonstration of
such sincere friendship!

Fantastically well adapted to its
surroundings, this plant family manages
to populate places that are at times
extremely inhospitable. Its shapes
are amazing. We find bromeliads in
mangrove swamps almost touching the
brackish water. As epiphytes they grow
on remote branches, or they may cover
the forest floor. Shaded by tall trees, they
glow with the same incandescent light as
the sunset and,like Cryptanthus zonatus,

spread over the ground like shed snake
skins.

Many bromeliads are covered with
so many thorns that they are always
defensive: they must have suffered
greatly to act in this manner. Some,
like Neoregelia pauciflora, are joined
together and seem to float in the air like
a Calder mobile. The Indians had also
discovered them. Their bromeliform
headdresses crowned noble heads.
Enchanted, painters Frans Post and
Margaret Mee sought to portray them.
I must not forget the pineapple, king of
fruits with both crown and throne, sweet
with indigenous sap.

All that remains is for genetic engineering
to create new shapes and blend colours:
cobalt blue would be much appreciated.
But here, removed from Nature, the merit
would be Man’s. In fact credit always
goes to those who work to increase
human knowledge. This is why Elton
Leme makes me respect more deeply
this quest for the Unknown. He reveals
the world to us where nature has been
mercilessly scourged. This world needs
to be protected and safeguarded. Those
who seek it out will thus be able to enjoy
the beauty of bromeliads. They will have
access to the keys that open the doors to
infinity.

The Amazon rainforest produces
more than 20% of the world’s oxygen
supply. The Amazon River pushes so
much water into the Atlantic Ocean
that, more than one hundred miles
at sea off the mouth of the river, one
can dip fresh water out of the ocean.
The volume of water in the Amazon
River is greater than the next eight
largest rivers in the world combined
and three times the flow of all rivers
in the United States.


Hiroyuki Takizawa –
Tillandsia explorer, collector
and experimental hybridizer

– Herb Plever. Reprinted and edited from ‘Bromeliana’, published in
January 2013 by New York Bromeliad Society. Photos by H.Takizawa
Hiroyuki Takizawa, ‘Hiro’ to
his friends, is and has been an
explorer/collector of tillandsias
for many years. He was co-author of
the ‘New Tillandsia Handbook’ which
contains excellent photos of tillandsias
and habitat material for each plant.
Professionally, Hiro is a noted kidney
and vascular surgeon in Tokyo where
he lives.

For the past 10 years he has been
hybridizing tillandsias, primarily with
his favorite, Tillandsia dyeriana, as
the seed parent. He has been using the
technique he calls ‘sterilized culturing’.
He grows the hybrid seedlings selected
from the cross in sterile containers
in an agar (liquid nutrient) that was

specially devised by him for Tillandsia
seedlings. Note that this is very
different from the procedure called
‘tissue culturing’ in which a meristem
(growing cellpoint) is removed from
the centre of the plant or from a leaf
axil under sterile conditions and grown
in a nutritious agar liquid. A single
meristem can produce many hundreds
of identical, cloned plantlets. Hiro says
that a seedling grown in his agar will
produce many pups.

He has found that Tillandsia seedlings
can be vulnerable to rot and disease
when removed from their sterile envir
onment, and they have difficulty
acclimatising to the greenhouse in
which he grows his collected plants.

T. dyeriana x cacticola with
albomarginated and Centre stripevariegation, growing in greenhouse.
Variegated. T. dyeriana
x cacticola growing ingreenhouse on cork.


T. dyeriana x R. dielsii(bottom) T. dyeriana
(top).
14


Hiro says, “I love to discover new
species in the wild, but not only that

– I really love to create nice plants. No
– only very, very, nice plants! I love
Tillandsia dyeriana so I have made
many dyeriana hybrids. My first one
was Tillandsia dyeriana x Racinaea
crispa, registered as xRacindsia
‘La Mano Magica’. This was the
first bigeneric hybrid made between
Tillandsia and Racinaea.”
Another new hybrid is a cross of

Tillandsia dyeriana x Racinaea dielsii

(?). In the photo the plant in front
with six long inflorescence spikes
was imported by Hiro from Ecuador
as Racinaea undulifolia but Hiro
believes it is R. dielsii (Harms) Luther.
It is cool-loving and requires high
humidity; very rare and difficult to
cultivate. It is a difficult feat just to be
able to cultivate and grow those high
altitude Racinaeas. It is a supreme
challenge to produce viable bigeneric
seedlings in which Racinaea is a
parent. (extraordinary and perhaps one
could say, ‘hiroic’).

Hiro has made many crosses with

T. dyeriana, including a recent one
with T. kautskyi that he has just taken
out of the sterile bottle and hopes to
acclimatize in his greenhouse. He says,
“I crossed Tillandsia dyeriana with
T. cacticola. I got hundreds of seeds
and sowed them all in many separate
culture boxes. I have been expecting
variegation… always!
One day, I found one unusual seedling.
It was a seedling with one or two
variegated leaves. In a sterilised
culture Tillandsias pup very well

even when small, like one inch tall.
I expected the seedling to pup from the
variegated side. Then, my dream came
true. Every pup had perfect variegation
in every leaf. Now I’m really
propagating them. Perfect variegation
produces both marginated and centre
variegated plants.” (See photo). But it
is really very hard to grow these plants
outside the box. It is a shame, but I lost
many, many variegated ones trying to
acclimatise them in my greenhouse.

The dry-growing character of the
Tillandsia cacticola parent seems to be
dominant in these plants – I thnk they
need a dry environment which makes
it difficult for them to accommodate to
my humid greenhouse. I managed to
get a few to grow (see photo of plant
on cork bark) and only once did one
of them bloom. It had such beautiful
bracts with a colour I had never seen
before. Imagine a combination of
delicate purple of the cacticola and
orange of the dyeriana! The bracts
were 80-90 % cacticola purple
and 10-20% slightly orange from
dyeriana. At that time my twin sons
were just babies, and my wife and I
were constantly exhausted taking care
of their many needs. Caring for twin
babies is more than just hard. It is like
a full-time job. Honestly, I could not
even make time to take a photograph
of that inflorescence.

Sadly, for four years or so since then
none of the plants have flowered. That
is the reason that I did not register
this variegated cross. But I’m sure
there will be much more to this story,
because the blooms will come.”


Group News

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Sandra Wheeler
We held our April meeting in the
immaculate gardens of Bev and Brian
Hutchings, Three Mile Bush Road,
Kamo and as always, this garden did
not disappoint with a beautiful show of
stunning bromeliads. Members took the
opportunity to purchase some for their
own collections.

When we could finally get everyone to
leave the gardens, our new President Stacy
Ellison opened the meeting by thanking
Bev and Brian for their hospitality and
welcomed 29 members and 4 visitors.
There was an apology from Jill Hayward
who has had a fall and broken her hip.
We decided to send flowers to cheer
her up. Jill had some records from our
very early days which have since been
collected and stored for future reference.
Included is a newspaper clipping of
Avon Ryan in his garden dated February
1997. With the first meeting to establish
the Group being held in March 1996, we
are not too far from a 20th Anniversary.
Jan reported on the trip to the Bromeliad
Sale at Mt Eden. Stacy asked members
to put their gardens forward as venues
for future meetings, if suitable, so a
list could be prepared well in advance.
A venue for our proposed Mid Winter
Xmas lunch was discussed and will be
finalised next month.

As new life member Freda Nash was
present we thanked her for all her
work on the Group’s behalf and Freda
responded by saying how it was a
wonderful surprise to be honoured in
that way. She said when it was decided
to plant bromeliads at the Whangarei

Quarry Gardens two trailer loads were
delivered and she had to plant them all
on the steep hillside, with no paths and
only loose gravel to plant in. Well done
Freda, this area is a credit to you.

All our members who attended the
‘Cool Broms’ conference enjoyed the
experience and Katherine gave us an
insight into what she had learnt.

It was decided to split the plants for
‘Show and Tell’ into two categories
to give the smaller less showy plants
a chance. From next month, members
will vote for two plants, one large and
one small. There were 13 plants in the
competition with a stunning Billbergia
‘Hallelujah’ belonging to Katherine
Kozel in first place taking 90% of the

2nd

votes. equal – Lou Panther with
a Guzmania hybrid and Lois Going,

3rd

Neoregelia ‘Buckingham’. equal

– Gail Atkins, Neoregelia ‘Golden
Delicious’ and Lyn White, Neoregelia
‘Morado’.
Next Meeting: Sunday 26th May, 1.30pm
at the Maungatapere property of Minnie
Whitehead, 727 Otaika Valley Road.
South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
We had an excellent turnout for our
Annual General Meeting at the Auckland
Botanic Gardens on 5th May, especially
given the inclement weather.
Roy Morton advised that Graham West
was standing down as President but that
he was delighted to advise that Marie
Healey was happy to step up to the role
and she was unanimously accepted.
Roy Morton was re-elected as Vice


President, Margaret Kitcher as Treasurer
and Marion Morton as Secretary. Four
new committee members were elected;
Pauline Ashton, Margaret Flanagan,
Jenny Gallagher and Brenda Green. We
are delighted to welcome them to the
committee, and our new President.

Roy Morton and Marie Healey thanked
Graham for his hard work over the
past 10 years, in setting up the South
Auckland Bromeliad Group, as well as
helping to establish bromeliad groups in
other parts of the country. He has been
a great ambassador for bromeliad plants
and introducing them to many people.
Graham will remain on the committee as
Immediate Past President. Graham and
Pat West were made Life Members.

To mark our 10 year anniversary
certificates were given to all members
who were present at our inaugural
meeting in February 2003. Norma Cook
has become our Patron after her 35 year
involvement with bromeliads.

Following the AGM, members were
given the opportunity of showing us
their favourite plants and providing
information about them, and there were
some very stunning plants on display.
Don Brown brought in a Vriesea ospinae
gruberi, Judy Graham a Billbergia
‘Domingos Martins’, Robert Flanagan a
Tillandsia streptophylla to name a few.

Members were reminded to wear their
name tags to all our meetings.The raffles
were won May Morrison, Brian Kitcher,
and Jill Marshall.

Next Meeting: 1:30pm on 2 June at the
Auckland Botanic Gardens, 102 Hill
Road, Manurewa. Neil Douglas will
cover removing pups and repotting.

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Jo Elder
Lynley welcomed 48 members to our
April meeting and thanked all who
had helped with the Fun Auction that
was held in March. She mentioned that
books had been purchased at the ‘Cool
Broms’ conference by members and
they would be catalogued and be in the
library soon. She reminded members
that subscriptions are now due, $15.00
per member or $20.00 per household.

Competition winners for the past year
were announced and presented with their
prizes. Open competition; 1st equal were
Gill Keesing and Graeme Alabaster, 2nd
was Jo Elder. The Tillandsia competition;

1st

was Audrey Hewson, 2nd equal were
Cushla Chudleigh and Jo Elder. In the
Novice section, 1st Doris Shea, 2nd Maisie
Kokshoorn and 3rd Pauline Hetherington.

The speakers for this meeting were
members who had attended the ‘Cool
Broms’ conference in March. It was
evident that they had all enjoyed
themselves immensely and they had high
praise for the organisation, the venue,
the speakers and everything about the
conference. The ‘Champion of the
Show’ was won by our own Natalie and
Brian Simmonds with their wonderful
Tillandsia tectorum. Audrey Hewson
gained a first in the Pitcairnioideae
section with Deuterocohnia brevifolia,
Jo Elder gained a first in Tillandsia
Small Foliage section with Tillandsia
tectorum. Jo Elder showed a PowerPoint
slide presentation from the photos she
had taken at the conference.

The ‘Plant of the day’ was ‘Purple and
Dark leaved neoregelias’. Barry Jones
brought along a selection of purple

Cont’d P18 17


Cont’d from P17 – Group News

leaved plants that he had hybridised, also
tabled were Neoregelia ‘Royal Flush’
‘Baileys Choice’ and ‘Silverado’.
‘Show and Tell’: Neoregelia ‘Rosy
Morn’ x ‘Lamberts Pride’ and a
neoregelia wanting a name. It was
thought to be Neoregelia ‘Apricot
Beauty’.
Open Competition: 1st Aechmea ‘Ida’,
Jo Elder, 2nd Vriesea seideliana, Graeme
Alabaster.
Tillandsia: 1st Tillandsia ‘Creation’ – Jo
Elder, 2nd Tillandsia crocata – Audrey
Hewson, 3rd Tillandsia crocata – Bertha
Schollum.

1st

Novice Section: Neoregelia

‘Silverado’– Diana Durrant.

Next Meeting: 12th June, at the TYPB
clubrooms Sulphur Point, 12.30pm.
Plant of the month :Vriesea. Andrew
Maloy will be the speaker and he will
have plants for sale. No garden visits
until October.

name tags along with many other tasks.
Her contribution to the group is really
appreciated by all. Broms in the Park
was discussed and it is hoped that a
group will attend this event. A day outing
to Tauranga was also discussed. We had
an interesting Show and Tell followed by
the drawing of raffles.

1st

Competition results were: Ross
Fergusson; 2nd Sue Laurent; 3rd Ross
Fergusson. Afternoon tea was served and
then the members had the opportunity
to buy more plants. A most enjoyable
afternoon.

Next Meeting: 16 June at Matata
Community Hall. Visitors are always
welcome to our meetings. Contacts:
Maureen Moffat 07-322 2276; Ross
Fergusson 07-312 5487; Sue Laurent 07307
1323.


Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
Orchid Group – Alison Iremonger

The meeting for April was held at the
home of Trevor and Pam Signal. Thirty
members attended. Trevor and Pam
are on the move, and had lots of plants
for sale. After the members had made
their purchases, we held our monthly
meeting. Sue welcomed all those present
and thanked Trevor and Pam for giving
everybody the chance to buy great plants
at a reasonable price. It was a special
day for Grace celebrating her birthday
and to Roger and Judith celebrating their
wedding anniversary.

Thanks were given to Maureen Moffat,
who organises all the trips away, guest
speakers to attend meetings, printing of

with Noelene Ritson

If you attended the ‘Cool Broms’
conference in Auckland in March
I’m sure you will agree that it was
a most enjoyable and informative few
days. I was really looking forward to
hearing the great line up of conference
speakers we had on the programme and I
was not disappointed!

Before I went to seminar number three
on the Saturday morning to hear José
Manzanares from Ecuador, I looked at
the title of his talk ‘New classification of
Tillandsioideae based on DNA studies’
and thought, ‘this is going to be too
difficult for me – but, we as we have two
of his books in the Reference Section of


our library, I need to concentrate hard
and learn more about this man.’

José began his talk by apologising for
his poor English but I can definitely
state that his delivery was not a problem

– in fact the opposite was the case. His
passion and enthusiasm for his subject
was obvious from the start and I found
myself sitting there in the theatre at the
Waipuna Conference Centre, soaking up
every word.
José also delivered another seminar later
in the conference about a plant collecting
trip he had made to Ecuador’s Condor
Mountains and that was also fascinating
and entertaining.

At the end of the conference I felt
privileged to be able to spend a short
time talking to José and his lovely wife
Karine. (I love plants but, probably
because I’ve been a teacher all my life,
I love people more, and I always want
to know why people do what they do).
I knew that José was born in Spain and
completed his agronomy studies at the
University of Barcelona before he went
to further his studies in Belgium. Karine
is from Belgium and so I wondered if
perhaps they had met in a plant laboratory
or perhaps on a plant expedition. Not so,
José explained with a twinkle, ‘we met
in a pub and I offered her a glass of beer
and she accepted and that’s how it all
began.’

I asked José how often he went on
exploration trips and he said, ‘only about
once a year.’ In his normal everyday job
in Quito, Ecuador he is giving advice
to people on how to grow roses and
carnations!

José Manzanares from Ecuador –
one of our keynote presenters at the‘Cool Broms’ 2013 conference.


We have two of his books in the
Reference Section of our library: ‘Jewels
of the Jungle – Bromeliaceae of Ecuador’

– Book One: Bromelioideae and Book
Two: Pitcairnioideae. José is still
working on Book Three: Tillandsioideae
and it’s due for publication soon.
Originally he thought four years would
be enough time to find the plants, carry
out morphological studies, photograph
the plants in habitat and gather other
supporting information. Instead he has
spent nearly twenty years on the task and
he has still not completed it! Every day it
seems there is a new species that requires
a visit to a new habitat, often over bad
roads, or by foot, canoe, light plane or
whatever means of transport is available

– to photograph, study and record.
Remember – once you have been a
member of the Bromeliad Society of
New Zealand for one year you are able
to borrow books from the Reference
Section. You can borrow the books of
José Manzanares and quickly become
‘lost’ in jewels of the jungle.


Article by Graeme Barclay


This month we look at another famous a Tillandsia that has a stunning and


long-lasting flower spike.

Tillandsia ‘Creation’

Tillandsia ‘Creation’ was ‘created’
almost 30 years ago in 1985
by Corn Bak, the well known
bromeliad nursery in The Netherlands.
Its parentage formula is two well known
species – Tillandsia platyrhachis x
Tillandsia cyanea, which are both native
to northern South American countries.
As one would expect with a primary

Tillandsia ‘Creation’

– photo Craig Nicholas, S.A.
Tillandsia ‘Creation’

– photo Lisa Vinzant, Hawaii.
hybrid (two true species making the
cross), the offspring from the grex has
displayed obvious traits of both parent’s
main features. In this case, both parents
have flat, paddle-shaped inflorescences
which are both bright pink in colour -
and both have large, violet flowers.

The resulting hybrid has augmented
these features to produce a delightful
combination of the two – a large
branching inflorescence from the
platyrhachis side, but with larger sized,
paddled flower bracts and flowers from
the cyanea side.

This plant normally grows to around
40-50cm diameter in our NZ conditions,
but with frequent feeding and a warm
environment it can reach up to 60cm
with over 80 thin, triangular leaves.
The leaves often change from green and
striated with maroon, to a bronze colour
when flowering ensues.

Tillandsia ‘Creation’ is quite easy to
grow in New Zealand and is best suited
to dappled shade areas, or morning sun
only. Protect from winter frosts and it
is also suitable for epiphytic mounting.
As with most green leaved Tillandsia
and Vriesea, it will normally produce
multiple pups around the base after
flowering if fertilised well. While it may
take some years to mature in our cooler
climate from a pup size, as the photos
below show – the wait is certainly worth
it when it finally explodes into flower
that lasts for several months.

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